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https://www.duolingo.com/Mr.Smilie

Goosebumps! (or whatever else that YOU want to read! just try it!)

Mr.Smilie
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Hello everyone!

I'm currently on the last lesson before the end of the 3rd checkpoint (past tense) and have recently been looking into immersion for a little more contextual vocab, but Wiki articles seem a bit to text bookie for my taste and I have a habit of trying to get those translations perfect before submitting, meaning it can take quite some time to figure out just how to phrase a sentence that I understand the gist of, which gets annoying at times because it feels so slow! (and can make a guy feel stupid or slow for not being able to just 'get it' when the context is there)

So today I got one of my favorite goosebumps (Escalofrios, "Chills") from when I was growing up from the library and started into the first chapter tonight, it took me over an hour with both the English and Spanish copies in my hand, and much cross-referencing and google translating to get the gist of the Spanish contest but by the end of the first chapter I can see how if I stick with this idea I will gather a fair share of new vocab as well as understanding more contextual usage.

as I said, the chapter took me over an hour for 7 small pages of text (actually it may have been closer to 2 hours, I didn't actually look at the clock when I started but I know it was over an hour) and I had both books in my hand cross referencing pretty much every other sentence, and google translating words at random (ok, not random but a select choice of the ones I didn't know) but I was reading words I did know (I seen words that I learned in the past tense lesson I did earlier tonight) and by the end of the chapter I had started to recognize some of those words I'd been looking up and cross referencing! now I'm sure it will take me time to really 'learn' those words, but I feel that if I can stick to this that by time I get through the second or third of them I will be able to understand most of it without all the cross referencing.. at least that's what I hope, and I enjoy these books enough to read them like this.. so even if I'm not getting everything memorized I'm getting contextual usage of the words and my subconscious can start to chew on them while my conscious works on cataloging and understanding what it can and hopefully that will help it click one day..

anyway! I wasn't sure how much I needed to know before starting on a task like this and I know others have to wonder the same thing, I feel that at the point I am I have learned much of the basics (I know there are more rules and a little more conjugation but I do intend to continue press forward in my lessons) so I feel that I can start into seeking out some usable vocab and what better way to do that then by reading a book that I used to increase my English vocab years ago?

I wanted to make this post to encourage anyone that may want to try reading something in the language they are trying to learn to just try it! it may be a big hurdle, but if it's something you truly enjoy reading you will be far more likely to press forward (even if you don't get the full story out of it) if you can get the gist of it and learn some new vocab it's worth the effort right?

Have fun learning your new language!

Meshach

3 years ago

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/vcel10
vcel10
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<h1>TIPS & NOTES</h1>
  • Try reading the chapter first entirely in Spanish. THEN re-read and go through the tedious process of translating and checking the English version.
  • Pick up and read a Spanish book (preferably one written by a native Spanish speaking author) without EVER referencing a English version. Surprisingly many native Spanish speaking authors write books in English for the American (E.E.U.U.) market, but they don't translate their own work.
  • You don't need to know anything. Just start reading and enjoy, especially if you have the original English version.
  • Read en español daily.
  • And eventually, I would strongly suggest using adding a monolingual dictionary (like wordreference.com) to your toolset. It's a tool that will help you think in Spanish.
  • Check out http://en.childrenslibrary.org/ They have a number of Spanish and English books that you can translate and compare.
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mr.Smilie
Mr.Smilie
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Those are great tips! 1: that would be nice, I hope to get there at some point but currently if I do that I'll just read a bunch of nonsense with some words I know thrown in and be totally lost, but one of my shorter term goals is to be able to go a chapter and just re-read the English to check myself on comprehension and find those tricky words.. 2: that may be a while for me but long term, sure! 3: that's exactly my point with this thread! people don't realize or accept that you are probably never going to have full comprehension and vocab of a random story book (sure, there ARE some) but if it's something you enjoy the story of and you are willing to go through the work to translate what you don't understand, you will more then likely come out with more understanding then you went in with, and that's the goal anyway right? 4: yes, practice makes perfect 5: huh, I've been there, but I'd forgotten about it or something, bookmarking and taking note of it.. 6: I'll have to look into those, thanks! Another source to add would be http://www.grimmstories.com/ you can read short Grimm fairy tales in your choice of 10 different languages

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CharmingTiger
CharmingTiger
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This is pure genius!!! I was an avid reader growing up, and reading books like the Goosebumps series was integral to expanding my vocabulary and reinforcing my knowledge of the English language.

That aspect of learning has so far been noticeably absent from my study of Spanish. I have wanted to begin reading books in Spanish for some time, but I don't know what to read, nor how to go about reading it. Pretty much anything is going to be a challenge, so I need an efficient system for looking things up. This cross-referencing idea sounds like it would greatly cut down on the time it takes to look up unfamiliar words and sentence structures.

Wonderful post, sir Smilie! :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vcel10
vcel10
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nor how to go about reading it.

Just Nike it. It won't hurt. You can easily read Norman Bridwell's "Clifford, el gran Perro Colorado" without referencing the orignal English version. ¡Vamosnos! Vete a la biblioteca! Fun tip that I discovered a while back. Many people post videos on YouTube, reading children's books in English, Spanish, French, German, etc. So you can find the Spanish version on YouTube and possibly find some one reading it on YouTube. So you don't have to worry about HOW the words are pronounced, you can hear an expert. Oh btw, many Spanish kids books are available as audio books. ¡Vete!

but I don't know what to read ?

Ehh . . . GOT cómicos son disponibles en español (acaso en tu biblioteca local)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mr.Smilie
Mr.Smilie
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The main reason I didn't want to start with something like Clifford is I just don't have much draw to it, I know it's closer to the skill lever of what I have, but if you don't have to look up words then you aren't being very well challenged and unless you are enjoying it you won't have much drive for it, part of my quarrel with wiki articles is that I just don't have a big interest in many of them, I have read the Goosebumps since I started into chapter books and enjoy them to this day so I think that I'm more likely to push myself to become better at understanding them then most other books..

The Spanish audiobooks off of YouTube is an awesome idea! (I'm actually one of those coughlower qualitycough contributors in English!) I will have to look around to see what kind of stuff I can find as I have been wanting something verbal to listen to that doesn't feel as overwhelming as the few shows or movies I have stumbled upon so far.. (also been listening to a few of the "coffee break Spanish" podcasts and they are not bad either..)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vcel10
vcel10
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I agree with you. If you're not interested or challenged. Skip it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tolunayo
tolunayo
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I have started reading Juego de Trones (Game of Thrones) a while back in October on Kindle and after reading a few chapters I kind of gave a break as I was consulting the dictionary too often. That series is definitely for more advanced readers. Not having seen the TV series or having read the English version did not help either.

Since then my vocabulary has improved so I may continue reading the book again in June (currently dealing with 3 different MOOC courses, in addition to Duolingo so it is a bit too much on my plate)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vcel10
vcel10
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I would imagine the translated version of THAT book would be difficult. The comics would probably be far easier. Martin has very long descriptive paragraphs.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tolunayo
tolunayo
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You are right. The sentences are pretty long.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vcel10
vcel10
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Martin will spend paragraphs describing a freaking dress.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/slogger
sloggerPlus
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I need an efficient system for looking things up . . .

Try uploading a book to a site like readlang. It provides a fairly good way to look up words as you read (e.g., nieto), and it saves the words you look up for later practice You can upload your own texts. For public domain texts, try something like "El maravilloso mago de Oz" or "Sin familia," by Malot (a favorite of mine in French), which are relatively easy.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mr.Smilie
Mr.Smilie
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that looks pretty awesome! I think I'll bookmark that for later.

the only problem I have is that if it's too easy to translate I sometimes find it hard to restrain myself from translating extra words I that I know (but that I am slow on) before my mind creates all those vital links needed for rapid recall.. but with properly exercised self control it looks like a great tool!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/slogger
sloggerPlus
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Yes, keep your fingers away from that mouse! One thing that helps is to try to read a sentence or paragraph w/ unknown words several times before looking up any of the words. Very often you'll be able to correctly guess meanings from context, after a few tries. Then you can see what the dictionary says.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mr.Smilie
Mr.Smilie
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I don't think I'd go that far, but thank you, it's always nice to hear of others that grew up on the same stories, I mean, it's Goosebumps!

that is one of the key reasons I wanted to start in on something like Goosebumps, I know it's easier to remember words while making silly sentences but I wanted something juicer to read. I know it's a big hurdle to tackle but I have always enjoyed them, they were my first chapter books growing up and to this date when I get bored of what I'm reading I like to go back and read a quick Goosebumps for the enjoyable "chills" of it (=

Thank you EnigmaticTiger, may your stripes be forever yours! (=

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ilmarien
Ilmarien
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As for what to read, you can go to Amazon's bestsellers list and search by genre:

http://www.amazon.com/Best-Sellers-Kindle-Store-Spanish-eBooks/zgbs/digital-text/7735161011

Quite a few of them are actually free.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aietra
Aietra
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Oh yes, this is /far/ more fun than wiki articles! I've been uploading a Doctor Who fanfiction in French to Immersion - a chapter a day - and translating it, and I've met a few other Whovians doing French who've joined me in it. And the continuity of it and the fact I stick with it and check every translation or correction has attracted some other regulars who aren't even into DW.

And my sister, who learns Chinese, has been working her way through Harry Potter, making a new vocab list for each page. The lists have been getting shorter and shorter as she gets further in and learns more vocab.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Erven.R

I would suggest using SpanishDict rather than Google Translate. :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mr.Smilie
Mr.Smilie
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that's probably a good idea.. I've seen a lot of people talking about using it because it gives conjugation and everything and is oftentimes more accurate, and I have used it a bit myself during lessons, although the reason I was using the Google translate was because I could hold the books in one hand and if I came across a word I wanted to check I could type it in with one hand and easily change or add a word and it would update the translation on the fly without having to load a new page, it may not be much of a reason, and it may not be the most accurate or best translator out there, but it has it's perks (= I'll give SpanishDict a try though ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
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I agree!! Reading is a great way to improve your language skills. I personally enjoy reading foreign language books on my Kindle. Duolingo's very own Greg Hullender wrote a great article about that, with all kinds of tips and suggestions about how to get the most out of it while avoiding frustrations. http://gregreflects.blogspot.com/2014/09/how-to-read-foreign-novel-on-kindle.html

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tolunayo
tolunayo
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Well, thanks for pointing me to another compound word. I'll add escalofria to the list of compound works (palabras compuestas) that I recently posted here.

escalofria = chills, shivers estar escalofriado/a = to fell chilly escalofriarse = to fell chilly, to be frightened

However, I think goosebumps in Spanish is actually piel de gallina but it could be regional.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vcel10
vcel10
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piel de gallina would not work for the Goosebumps books.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tolunayo
tolunayo
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OK I got it for this case. However when speaking in general terms piel de gallina is more commonly used translation for goosebumps (or goose pimples).

http://www.linguee.com/spanish-english/translation/piel+de+gallina.html http://www.linguee.com/spanish-english/translation/escalofr%C3%ADo.html

(BTW, I like linguee for listing a bunch of real world usage around the web for the term you are looking for)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vcel10
vcel10
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Linguee + Google news search = ; -)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mr.Smilie
Mr.Smilie
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It was unintentional but you are welcome. when I started looking for the books in Spanish I actually looked up the translation of "Goosebumps" and got "piel de gallina" myself, I tried searching the web for them with no avail, then I searched out "Goosebumps in Spanish" and found them under the title of "escalofios" another interesting thing I found out later was that they were also published under the title of "Pesadillas" which translates as "Nightmares"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lisajanea

Books that I recommend to start out with, start easier and you will understand more rather then going for harder stuff. If you have a kindle you can download a sample for free and decide if you want to buy, or if you are an audible member you can download the free pdf transcripts and buy the audio to improve even more. So many things to choose from!!

Easy Spanish Reader – starts simple has a quiz at the end of each chapter and then all chapters together and another quiz Spanish Novels by Paco Ardit – nice cheap easy to read stories that aren’t too complicated Funny tales in easy spanish – have just read the free sections of lots of these Kindle easy spanish stories – lots you can download the first few chapters to your kindle then they end up being free if you don’t want to continue ¡Buen Camino! – My favourite beginners read, interesting story not aimed at kids with easy Spanish, free audio with the kindle book but need to be connected to internet. Lola Lago series - different verb tenses, can be downloaded free with audible and then you just pay if you want the audio

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ourania533618

Hey!!! I literally googled "read goosebumps in another language to learn the language" because I also ordered a print of escalofrios (actually the "Spain"-Spanish one called Pesadillas haha)

I loved goosebumps as a child and I have almost every single one that came out in Greece and some English ones too. I am a beginner in Spanish (13% in duo lingo) but very excited and learning fast.

Thanks for sharing this. I was very excited that someone else had the same idea with me. I will start reading goosebumps without much expectations, just want to check out some vocabulary and I will start to understand more later . I am already having so much fun translating the titles! haha

peace and love

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mr.Smilie
Mr.Smilie
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it's nice to see other people coming up with the same idea! I actually have some of both the escalofrios books as well as some of the pesadillas now, and I have started listening to them in audio form now as well. I think I said this in my old post but I would advise picking an old favorite that you know well to start off with, that way way you know the plot-line and can find yourself more easily if you get lost. I find you are better off not translating every word that you don't understand right off but rather wait to see if you can understand the general idea form the contest you can translate, it's less distracting more encouraging than stopping to translate every word you don't know right off, and if you already know the basic story it's amazing how fast your brain can tie the pieces together (=

are you listening to anything yet? if you watched Disney movies growing up and like any of them I'd advise starting with some of those songs just to get a feel for how the language flows and you can pick up some words there as well (= the second most important thing is to not get discouraged if you don't understand every word or if you make mistakes, learning a language is a long journey but the reward is well worth the effort!

<h1>1 most important thing is to have fun! when you enjoy yourself you learn faster and you are more motivated to keep learning!</h1>

Buena suerte con tu viaje! Salud, paz y el amor!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ourania533618

I thought I had answered to you one week ago, but my message never appeared, aahh.

Anyway! I watch a lot of Spanish and latin american films. I have learnt so many words from the titles only...I have listened to a lot of spanish songs and translate them when I have time. I also watched a mexican telenovela i spanish which I had watched before in greek haha The disney song idea was great and I am listening right now. Even if I am not focused all the time I catch a lot of vocabulary. I am super excited it is so easy to learn a language nowadays. I hope that I visit a spanish language country in the following two years. Thanks a lot for your ideas and good luck to you too !

Gracias por la respuesta mi amigo! Saludos!

1 year ago