"I am eating."

Translation:Ich esse.

December 24, 2012

19 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linuxist

Can I write it like this "Ich bin isst" instead


[deactivated user]

    No. German doesn't have a continuous aspect. Both "I eat" and "I am eating" translate as "Ich esse".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/camieman10

    So bin(am) is only used in its literal context of "to be"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bukkowsky

    What about "Ich esse gerade"? If I want to stress that I'm referring to present continuous wouldn't it be better than just "Ich esse"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aloe.cc

    Absolutely right.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/basilkar

    I believe you can also say "ich bin am Essen" or even "ich bin beim Essen" (the infinitive used as a noun) to convey a present continuous meaning, but this might not be "hochdeutsch" use -- I'm not sure (people do say it all the time though).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Koco1223

    I thought it was Isst? Or does Isst mean eat?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Boxeye

    I eat = Ich esse. She/he eats = Sie/er isst.

    The word for "eat" changes in both English and German. :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/prmichaelsen

    The german verb is "essen", conjugated "esse" for the pronoun "ich"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FreidaVale

    Why is it that if it's "i" there is an 'e' added to both esse and trinke and not if it's speaking of someone else?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ebrobinson

    Why in English is the verb "To be"
    I am
    You are
    The answer is, it just is.
    German verbs just seem to do this almost all the time, as far as I understand.
    On the upside the patterns are much more predictable than English, eg:
    It's pretty common to have "e" at then end of verbs with "I".
    eg: Ich
    Spreche
    Esse
    Trinke
    Mache
    Lese

    Then you can consistently add "n" to get the form for "We", eg:
    Wir
    Sprechen
    Essen
    Trinken
    Machen
    Lesen


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RockinAbs

    Can you not just say 'esse' meaning "I drink"? The "Ich" is necessary?


    [deactivated user]

      You can't drop it.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luisfcaraujo

      Is there a rule for these differences? Like: Ich esse du/er/sie/es isst ihr esst Sie/sie essen

      Is there a logic structure on these differences? Like, if I know that in this case it is like this, I can't use the same rule to another verb?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Awheezi

      Does German follow the same grammar structure as English in a Subject-Verb agreement form? Meaning, if one has a singular subject(noun) then you need a plural verb, right? That why, it is Icch esse, and not Ich isst. Just mentioning the way I view it.


      [deactivated user]

        It's not that simple. When it comes to subject-verb agreement and pronouns, German is more complex than English.

        http://goo.gl/4F4lM


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NickDanger3

        " if one has a singular subject(noun) then you need a plural verb" No, for a singular subject the verb needs to be in the singular as well, in English and in German.

        Learn German in just 5 minutes a day. For free.