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  5. "Ele nunca tinha perguntado m…

"Ele nunca tinha perguntado meu nome."

Translation:He had never asked my name.

September 21, 2013

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/timcupples

"o meu nome"reported again...... 3 de marco de 2015, a year after first reported!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Krystyon

"He never had asked my name" is not being accepted....

This is a bit like a translation lottery sometimes. Type in anything and hope for the best.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Macjory

One year later -- Mar. 7, 2015 -- "he never had asked my name" is still not being accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joveschild

Probably because it's incorrect English. I'm not a native speaker but it just doesn't sound right.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/clottedcream

it's grammatically correct but a bit unnatural. It should be accepted by Duo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jelenica7

Are you sure? I thought it was either "He had never asked..." or "NEVER had he asked...".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emeyr

"Adverbs of frequency" go between the auxiliary verb and the principal verb in standard English grammar. When adverbs of frequency are placed out of that order, they tend to make the sentence emphatic.

English Grammar in Use - Murphy (Cambridge U Press)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joaod1983

It is perfectly correct in English to say, "He never had asked my name". I am a native British English speaker and it is a natural way of saying this sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roele

why using the article 'o meu nome' here is not correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

That is also correct!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RodrigoFreitas0

Native brazilian here. She said "Ele nunca tinha perguntado O meu nome". But DL didn´t accept.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

It's also right.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ian765520

Oh well. DL adverb lottery. Again. It’s just the way a romance speaker thinks English is spiked. Ahem.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mikenorling

The sentence sounds odd in English. I do not know if it does so in Portuguese as well. It would be normal speech to ask "about" or "for" my name, but the construction without a preposition leaves you wondering what the actual meaning of the phrase is.

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