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"No sé qué pensar."

Translation:I do not know what to think.

5 years ago

75 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Mark2020
Mark2020
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Why is it qué and not lo que. I still can't figure out the difference.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mark2020
Mark2020
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I did find a page that explained the use of qué, dónde, etc in the middle of a sentence but cannot find it now. I think it said that 'qué' can be used (which is normally used in a question) when it is an implied question. No sé qué pensar. I do not know what to think. (What should I think?) No puedo decir qué comieron. I cannot say what they ate. (What did they eat?)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregIhnen

But that's not a question. It's not saying "what should I think?". It's a statement. It's saying "I don't know what to think".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArnasBradu

Actually "I don't know what to think" is a statement which contains an embedded question.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eamesy

I disagree. It is a standalone statement. If 'I don't know what to think' contains an embedded question, then any statement of uncertainty does (which clearly isn't true). You can be uncertain without wanting to hear other people's opinions on the matter (see: agnosticism).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Furbolg

That's how I like to think of it

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GarethViejoLento

It is a reordering of 'what to think?' 'I don't know' ... ?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Furbolg

I think it's because you're using "que" in the terms of "what", instead of "that" or its other possible applications.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HolomorphicShawn
HolomorphicShawn
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I believe it's because "lo que" always stands for a noun (as it's a relative pronoun), but the "what" in "I don't know what to think" doesn't necessarily take the place of a noun. If you can replace "lo que" with "that thing", it is probably correct:

Tú sabes lo que quiero decir (You know what I'm trying to say / You know that thing I'm trying to say)

No sé lo que pensar (I don't know that thing to think - doesn't quite work)

-Hence qué works, with the accent as que without an accent means "that" or "than", neither of which work in this sentence.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

I see what you're trying to say, but lo" was not in the spoken sentence, nor in the translation. If you diagram the sentence, "I" is the subject, "do (not) know" is the verb with a negative qualifier, & the remainder is the object phrase, "what to think" (which kind of IS "that thing" which you do not know, or "the answer" to a query, like "I don't know the answer" = "I don't know what to say," (meaning the same thing but using different words, if asked what do I think is a solution to a problem). So the response to a question really is not a question, & I still don't feel we have a very good explanation as to why que has an accent. Maybe after the verb "to know" the qué takes that form, the opposite of the way we treat tengo que*? An expert opinion would be nice ...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

When "que" means "that," it doesn't have an accent. When "qué" means "what," it has an accent. Incidentally, whether the sentence is EX1, "No sé qué pensar" (I don't know what to think), or EX2, "No yo sabía que lo supieras." (I didn't know that you knew), the "qué/que" translates to what is known in English as a relative pronoun. In English, relative pronouns, such as "what" and "that," can act as subjects (What is that?/¿Qué es eso?), or as objects (I see that/Veo eso).

When relative pronouns introduce subordinate clauses, they are called relative conjunctions. Relative conjunctions may or may not act as the subject of said subordinate clauses. In the following example, a relative clause is used as the complete SUBJECT, and a relative clause is used as the complete OBJECT. EX3: THAT you can behave is WHAT I am trying to determine/Que tú puede comportarse es lo que estoy intentando determinar. The subject relative clause is "THAT you can behave," and the object relative clause is "WHAT I am trying to determine." The sentence's predicate verb is "is."

Relative adverbs are adverbs that perform the same way as relative conjunctions. In other words, the adverb is the head of the phrases used as the subject and the object of the the following example. EX4: WHEN I am tired is WHEN I am bad tempered/CUANDO estoy cansado es CUANDO tengo un mal genio.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mathchoo

tldr

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mathchoo

I sure hope DavidMoore622957 is using irony...

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

You have made an error.

"tldr" is composed of two clauses that need to be separated by a comma (tl,dr). In practice, a semicolon appears to be the more common usage (tl;dr), effectively treating the two clauses as complete sentences.

In the first clause, the subject and verb are omitted, but the construction makes it evident that the phrase "tl" is the adjective complement to a simple Subject-Verb (SV) phrase such as "It is" or "That is." It is an independent clause that expresses a completed idea and is not the subject of the second clause.

The second clause is more nearly a complete standalone sentence, though it too is missing the subject. The lack of a subject necessitates the use of a comma or semicolon as noted above. Although the phrase "dr" is meant to acknowledge the speaker's lack of familiarity with some material identified in context, it typically applies to exceedingly dense and lengthy technical or legal documents (e.g., the US tax code, the Apple EULA, etc.).

In this case, I believe, the usage indicates the speaker's desire for willful ignorance. This can be inferred from the fact that the "tldr" comment was an unsolicited reply without making any useful contribution to the discussion at hand. Also, the object passage is obviously not tl for anyone literate in the English language and, therefore, not a sincere justification for the conditional clause "dr."

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jayda_Love

Because lo means it

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John__Doe
John__Doe
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IMHO, perhaps it's because lo que has other meaning which will lead to ambiguity. http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/relproelque.htm

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mathchoo

Thanks for the link to a relevant reference.
This supports the reasoning put forth by HolomorphicShawn

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

mark- there's no direct objec t in the sentence, so lo doesn't fit here

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/happysteve

I had "I don't know what to expect". Is that wrong?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vicki.kura

According to the translators "I don't know what to expect" is "no sé que esperar".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

happy- 2 different meanings

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dugggg
Dugggg
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Always think of "lo que" as meaning "that which". So in this case, "qué" (meaning "what") makes much more sense.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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I thought sé was past tense and said "I didn't know what to think".

Just as I think I'm doing well, along comes a little irregular to kick me in the whotsits!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IanQuek
IanQuek
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Since qué can be either "what" or "how", what is wrong with "I don't know how to think"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HolomorphicShawn
HolomorphicShawn
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Qué means "how" only in interjections:

¡Qué bonita esta casa! = How beautiful this house is!

But qué never means "how" or "cómo" as a means to an action or an explanation to an intention. "I don't know how to think" = No sé pensar. (Saber hacer algo = To know how to do something"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mars7017
mars7017
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This is a perfectly literal translation. No sé : I do not know, qué : what, pensar : to think.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bapaydin
bapaydin
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can i also say "No sé lo que pensar."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THeNeeno

No. You would have to conjugate pensar if you used lo que.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RatInAMaze

This sounds right -

I don't know what to think vs. I don't know the thing that I am thinking/you are thinking/etc.

In the second case, I guess that "que" would lose its accent mark as well (as bapaydin says), because it changes from an indirect-question marker to part of a relative pronoun.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IanSchlom

After so much discussion, this makes the most sense. "No sé qué pensar" vs "no sé lo que él piense."

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kilyns
KilynsPlus
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Its not question. I dont know what i think about you this tv or your cooking.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BraydonDav

Yeah so I answered exactly the answer and it said it was incorrect. Wtf

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Claudia422887

My answer is the same as the translation.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EowynBaggi

Thought this said 'No seca pensar', whatever that would mean. Oh well.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tim44333

I gave coirect answer and Duolingo said I was incorrect

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amir.pro
Amir.pro
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Why can't we translate it to I don't know what to think about?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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I would back translate "I don't know what to think about" as "No sé sobre qué pensar" .

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stsmith50

I wrote " I don't know what to think" and it was marked wrong?????

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

Probably a temporary glitch. Whenever it happens, simply flag your translation as correct. There's not much else you can do apart from trying other translations.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rashaezzat

whats the meaning of it , i can't understand this, why it is not "no se como pensar"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

It means there is a lot of information and you are not sure of your conclusions/opinions. something like that. It is not "I don't know how to think." (and we wouldn't use como in that case anyway, because the how is "included" in the verb saber)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/evaaaah

Por qué what en vez de that?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hairyphil

Because it is a question.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LowlandPhilomath

Am I correct in thinking that this is not saber + que + infinitive, but rather the qué is purely a what? And for that matter, if you forgot how to think at all, no sé pensar would be grammatically correct? :P

The qué rather than que hints to this, but with many verbs in this infinitive section having a intermittent que, or de or a - it does get a bit confusing sometimes :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

lowland- In some sentences affirmative/negative in Spanish, you can put QUÉ with accent, because you wonder about something. creo QUE mi padre está enfermo/I believe/think that my father is sick. no sé QUÉ libros voy a elegir/I don't know which books I'm going to choose. It implies a question in my head, I wonder about my choice.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/conor.raff
conor.raff
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ah, the concept of "uncertainty"...

yo sé que pensar (certainty)

yo NO sé quÉ pensar (uncertainty - and therefore que -> qué, as if it were a question, which it sort of is, because of the uncertainty)

(Uncertainty is also a very important topic for the subjunctive)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RomeoVertieri

why not "[...] what thinking"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

romeo- grammatically incorrect

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galleon484
galleon484
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What about "No sé qué a pensar"?

I don't understand when the infinitive should/shouldn't have the preceding 'a'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

galleon- often infinitive verbs need a preposition, but depending of the context, it can be other preposition than A. You can't have 2 prepositions for the same verb here

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eva.prat
eva.prat
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When you are going to do the action you need 'a', for example: vamos a comer.., vas a correr....ella va a ganar...When is only an infinitive doesn't need it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bettyeb2002

I still after reading the discussion do not understand what word in the sentence indicates it is in the first person.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/conor.raff
conor.raff
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sé is the first person singular of the verb saber (in the present tense)

the form "sé" is unique to the first person singular, so when you see "sé" anywhere you know its can only refer to the first person singular

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marchgo

Thank you!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Yo sé - I know - see HERE.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eva.prat
eva.prat
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only put (yo) and you will see this way that the sentence has sense

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tylerdfy

Why is this wrong; i dont know what to expect

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/addictedto11

Is se' (forgive me I don't have accents on my keyboard) to know a person or to know a fact?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dugggg
Dugggg
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Sé -> saber -> to know (a fact). Think of conocer as "to meet" (a person).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sstelli

why there is sé?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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"" is the verb "I know". Check out the conjugation table for saber.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eva.prat
eva.prat
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hello, -yo sé- -tú sabes- -él sabe- -ella sabe- -nosotros sabemos- -vosotros sabéis- -ellos saben-

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duggers8

audio is terribel!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stephanie730165

This is easy

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alinatch

Hello. I found a page that analyses the reason why a word has an accent. Here is the link: http://llevatilde.es/palabra/qu%C3%A9. As you pointed out, "que" is written with or without an accent according to the context around the word and the word's meaning. The following are some examples:

1 que (Relative pronoun)

(Pronombre relativo) Llegó a la hora que habíamos acordado. No le dijo que había suspendido el examen.

2 qué (Question word)

(Pronombre interrogativo) ¿Qué hora es? ¿Por qué se ríe de eso modo? No sé qué estará pensando. (Indirecto) - This is an example of an indirect, implied question. The indirect questions are introduced by the following verbs: preguntar, querer saber, etc.

There's more information here:http://www.practicaespanol.com/interrogaciones-indirectas/. Basically, the indirect questions have the structure of a statement and are introduced by one of the following phrases or a synonym: Me gustaría saber qué llevas en esa mochila. Te importaría decirme cuántos años tienes. Me ha pedido mamá que te pregunte que qué quieres para comer. Dice que no sabe qué hacer.

3 qué (Noun)

(Sustantivo) Su duda no era el qué lo había provocado, sino el cómo. (An example when its role in a sentence is that of a Noun, with lo / el / etc.)

4 qué (Exclamatory pronoun)

(Pronombre exclamativo) ¡Qué tarde es! No te imaginas qué sorpresa se van a llevar. (Indirecto)

In conclusion, when "que" is a question word in an indirect question or it plays the role of a "Noun" in the sentence it should be written with an accent. "Que" seems to be trickier than all other question words: quien, cual, etc. (http://llevatilde.es/palabra/cu%C3%A1l / http://llevatilde.es/palabra/qui%C3%A9n). They do not have as many forms or functions in a sentence.

I hope this helps.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alinatch

PS There is an exclamatory form with an accent, too. It is again introduced by a group of expressions that require "qué", with an accent.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobChristiansen

yo no saber a que pensar

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Randlie

Where is the first person implied in the sentence - "No sé qué pensar?"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dansmisterdans

Why not subjunctive "No sé lo que piense" - I don't know what I might or should think

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eva.prat
eva.prat
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i'm spanish i don't know explain but is so wrong. el subjunctive for me is so complicated in your language too. no sé que pensar is a phrase that is usually said that way. No other way

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maddie54051

I always have trouble listing to them mostly they talk too fast even in the slow mode button.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Angry_Mongoose

Oh, that dreaded sentence. It strikes fear into the hearts of children when a parent says those words.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SheilaArtt

How do I type the accent over some letters using my samsung tablet

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaudGivord

I wrote I don't know what to think.... Correct as well!!!

6 months ago