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  5. "The leaves begin to fall."

"The leaves begin to fall."

Translation:As folhas começam a cair.

September 21, 2013

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/razzakinho

Why is the article "a" used here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

The verb "começar" usually requires the preposition A when something "start/begin TO". Começo a trabalhar às oito = I start work at eight.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/razzakinho

That clears things up, thanks a lot!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kunstkritik

What about para?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

When it means "in order to" it applies: "vamos começar para não atrasarmos?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hubert384667

Beside "comecar" are there any other verbs that require the "a"??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Quarfindo

In situations like these where the infinitive verb is preceeded by a prep due to the preps association with the previous verb, why do we use the infinitive at all? Couldn't we just use "cai" here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

Some verbs require preposition in Portuguese.


[deactivated user]

    Can the verb "INICIAR" be used instead?

    • As folhas INICIAM a cair.

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

    I'd say when you have a verb after "começar", it should be "começar a", and not "iniciar". I don't exactly know whether this is wrong, but a native spaker wouldn't use it.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulAbraha11

    I get the error 'You need the article "a" here'. I concede the error ;-) , but surely it's not an article but a preposition?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HarryHalle2

    I was thinking the same thing. This construction is subject + verb + prepositional phrase. It seems very strange to native English-speakers because we simply never use it, probably because "to" is part of the infinitive form and "to to" is, obviously, very awkward.

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