"You are eating the apple."

Translation:Ihr esst den Apfel.

December 24, 2012

181 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/eleonoraonline

To recap, are the potential correct answers to this as follows: Du isst den Apfel. Ihr esst den Apfel. Sie essen den Apfel.

January 8, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Caileen7

I believe so! Du isst den Apfel. (You = singular, informal) Ihr esst den Apfel. (You = plural, informal) Sie essen den Apfel. (You = singular/plural, formal)

February 16, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/JordanMuzquiz

I understand the rules from german to english. But how can you discern whether they want singular, informal or plural informal etc. simply from the word "you"?

March 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/RahulBindra

Actually the key is to look at the form of the verb "essen" in this case. This form is typically used with plurals and that is how I eliminated Du from the choice (Du = singular)

March 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/d3t3rm1n3d

Why doesn't Sie = she?

May 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/GraceRosier

Sie can mean formal you.

May 18, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/JMZinicola

As GraceRosier noted, "Sie" can be a formal form of "you". However, an important difference to note for that use case is that it will always be capitalized. Conversely, "sie" (referring to "she" or "they") would normally only be capitalized at the start of a sentence.

April 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/PamMcCarty

The forms of "Sie" are pretty easy to understand. I don't get the verb conjugations at all.

March 21, 2019, 5:50 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/sevenqueen

thank u so much:)

May 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Siebenundzwanzig

I don't believe you can, unfortunately. :( They clearly need to sort this.

March 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Tymon06

I never even knew why there was a difference between Sie and Ihr - they need to make it possible to see discussions from the app. Glad I stopped in! I'm about to have viele hearts left.

November 17, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/tiki_92090

In my classes in my American high school in germany and in college I've always been taught that Ihr =Ya'll/You all. Never have I ever been taught or heard that Ihr means You.

May 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/sebastiant17

"You" in english is the plural of itself (you all/y'all is very specific to the southern united states), you can refer to one person or several by saying you. In this case ihr refers to several people.

September 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/sweilan1

The only time I've ever heard "y'all" was when visiting Texas or in a movie. Never heard it used within Germany. All Germans I've ever conversed with used you for ihr.

May 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/sunnysjamil

Sweilan1. You take it too literally when someone uses the word y'all to separate the second person singular from the second person plural. You did so in another thread also.

It is simply easier to visualize one word for a pronoun instead of the clunky "you (sing.)" and "you (pl.)". No one here insists that y'all be used as a real word. The user Tiki_92090 simply says that he/she has always seen the German word "Ihr" translate to "you all", or "y'all", and never just "you". This is understandable.

May 22, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/tiki_92090

Well I guess we had different experiences in our time there. Also, "Ya'll" is not limited to Texas.

May 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/sweilan1

I've been involved in German studies for almost 40 years and have never encountered the use of "y'all" within said courses until I've come to Duolingo.

In all German classes I've ever attended, ihr is simply translated as "you" - with the notation (informal plural) never required.

It just seemed strange all of a sudden seeing y'all.

May 22, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/PamMcCarty

sweilan1, yes, the "you" is meant to address more than one person. It's AS IF we were saying "y'all" in English.

March 21, 2019, 5:14 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/MattBenet
  • 14
  • 11
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6

How many Americans use yall? It's just that we don't have a word for you: plural. Spanish does, German does, English doesn't

July 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/CarolSJohn

You all, you guys, "youse". (Even "you'uns".) Different regions (of the US at least) have different ways of dealing with plural you informally.

March 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/AidanConno4

Hiberno English (English spoken by Irish people) uses "ye" as third person plural, essentially the equivalent of "y'all"

October 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/PamMcCarty

MattBenet....context! (And I use y'all all the time. I grew up in Florida.)

March 21, 2019, 5:16 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/cchow02

Niether have i

September 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/zirsigari_1

Tnxs for this cm :D

December 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Luis-Sosa13

are you sure :sie essen den Apfel:'s right??

April 22, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/filfranca

Ihr should be translated as something like y'all (like we say in the south), so plural for you.

March 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/rodio63

If we write "you" ' in german it means "du" or "ihr" and not "sie"

May 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/sweilan1

Close. du = you (informal singular); ihr = you (informal plural); and Sie = you (formal). These are all nominative case.

May 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/PamMcCarty

Why "den"????

March 21, 2019, 5:48 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/spacepope

That word 'sie' drives me insane, it means she, you, they, and every time I guess it's wrong. Schieße!

January 11, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/yaliyev
  • 20
  • 19
  • 13
  • 11
  • 9
  • 8

I am not professional but here is what I learned few days ago. If "sie" is in the middle of sentence and not capitalized it is either "she" or "they". To distinct them look to the verb. If "sie" is capitalized in the middle of the sentence it is 100% "you" (formal, plural). If it is at the beginning of the sentence then it is possible to recognize "she" by looking at the verb. But it is not simple to find out whether it is "they" or "you" if it is at the beginning of the sentence. You must use context to understand. I am waiting for comments of professionals. Thank you in advance.

January 11, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/spacepope

Danke.

January 12, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Germandy
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 11
  • 8
  • 6
  • 5

If "sie" is capitalized in the middle of the sentence, I don't see why it couldn't also be "you" (formal, singular) as well. It doesn't have to be plural only because it's in the middle of a sentence. I can understand how this must drive you insane... the best way when translating the German sentence into English is to look at the conjugation of the verb and the context, really.

March 1, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Wolfine152

unfortunately though, knowing what capital goes where isn't going to help you when youre talking to someone in german

January 14, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/AbrilRestr

Exactly!

March 30, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Fazel440395

Genau!

June 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/sebastiant17

Look at the way the verb is conjugated (changed based on who is doing what), for example sie laufen (you walk), this is formal you because it is the whole form of the verb (laufen). On the other hand sie lauft (she walks). Other examples are sie fahren and sie fahrt, hopefully that makes it easier.

September 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/PamMcCarty

It's the conjugation of the verbs that is confusing me! I get "sie" and "Sie" and all that....but the conjugations have me completely stymied. There has been no explanation of them in this learning vehicle (Duo) at all.

March 21, 2019, 5:34 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Germandy
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 11
  • 8
  • 6
  • 5

spacepope - it's "Scheiße!" ;-)
[schießen = to shoot]

March 1, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/spacepope

Thanks, but either way it works out, I meant it as a mild expletive, so, shoot!, fits just as well. (I do tend to transpose the ei/ie in the German words.)

March 2, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/AustinGreathouse

ei sounds like "i" whereas ie sounds like "e" usually :P but you probably know that by now haha

November 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/filfranca

My German teacher used to say, "Never say die"

March 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Flegel

I totally understand what you mean

December 21, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Fazel440395

Realy Schieße es!!!! Ich habe das same problem!!!

June 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Arelisha

I agree with you, sometimes I think I am guessing...

March 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/karimbma
  • 11
  • 11
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2

What is "den"????when is it used??

January 13, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Stanly_Starly

Den is the accusative article of der.

December 25, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/PamMcCarty

Stanly....what in the world does that mean???

March 21, 2019, 5:43 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Eintrachtfan

It's the article used when you use accusative.

January 14, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/sweilan1

Den is also dative plural.

August 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/NatriciaTu

sweilan1, your comments were extremely helpful! I just learned more here than I actually learned in my English and French classes. I finally understanding. And all it took was for me to be thrown in the middle of Germany trying to learn the language. :)

March 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/sweilan1

Thank you very much! I really do appreciate your kind remarks. I have always wondered if anyone ever read my comments.

March 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/CelineC

What is the accusative in German?

January 6, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/sweilan1

direct object

January 10, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/FelipePJ

Thanks

December 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/fb56653

It is the case to be used when determining the article for the object in a sentence where the action of the verb applies I think For good Information on cases go to internet and type in German Grammar Rules then at website look for FREE WIKEPEDIA there you will find 15 pages of great info

December 6, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/kamal9033

Great!!!

March 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/yaliyev
  • 20
  • 19
  • 13
  • 11
  • 9
  • 8

What is the difference between isst and esst? Thank you in advance!

January 10, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/sweilan1

du isst (you singular informal) -- ihr esst (you plural informal).

January 10, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/anielsen31

I don't understand the use of "den", why do I use it instead of "das" or "der" or "die"? Thanks.

July 23, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/yaliyev
  • 20
  • 19
  • 13
  • 11
  • 9
  • 8

If the masculine noun is in accusative use den instead of der.

July 23, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/anielsen31

But I don't understand what accusative is.

July 23, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/fraurickerl

Accusative case is when we say "I love him", the 'him' is accusative (he is being loved - he's getting 'verbed'). We can't say "I love he" because we only use 'he' in English in the nominative case (the person or things that performs the verb). This gets so confusing in German because there are three words for 'the' and only one in English. "Der" is the only form of 'the' that changes from nominative to accusative. See the examples below:

  • Der Mann mag den Hund. (The man likes the dog but 'the' is different in German because the man [der Mann] is doing the action of liking and the dog [den Hund] is being liked.)

  • Der Mann mag das Auto. (Der Mann stays the same because he's still liking something. What does he like? Das Auto - 'das' stays the same in accusative and nominative case.)

  • Der Mann mag die Frau. (Der Mann stays the same because he's still liking something. What does he like? Die Frau - 'die' stays the same in accusative and nominative case.)

  • Die Frau mag den Mann. (Die Frau doesn't change even though now she's liking something. What is she liking = den Mann. Der changed to den because now the Mann is being verbed [being liked]).

It's difficult and takes time to learn. Keep it up! You'll get there and even if you mess it up, most messages will still be accurately communicated to native Germans.

November 14, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/juandr0o

THIS should be at the top. So helpful.

December 31, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/sarathrsk

U made it easy

April 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Siebenundzwanzig

Thank you so very much; this is something I seriously need to get drilled into my head. After four+ years of studying/speaking German, I still forget these simple things. -.-

March 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/fraurickerl

I'm a German teacher, I know how that goes. Some of us get it more easily than others.

March 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Elena0209

Thanks a lot, this was extremely helpful! ♡

June 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/PamMcCarty

frauricker.....Entschuldigung, but that makes no sense at all.

March 21, 2019, 5:41 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/AgenTsi

Direct objects are things that receive an action. Accusative case is the grammar case you use to conjugate direct objects and their articles.

July 26, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/PamMcCarty

yaliyev....what does "accusative" mean? I never learned that in English classes.

March 21, 2019, 5:37 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/sebastiant17

It's explained quite well above by AgenTsi. The first case is the nominative case, which refers to things like "I" and the nominative are things like "me". In German, like in English, you cannot start a sentence with "me", but rather "I". The same is the case when you see something. For example "Can you see me?" not "Can you see I?". The same is true in German, the accusative is the direct object (in the case of my example, the thing being seen).

March 21, 2019, 5:49 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Nives10

To recap, are the potential correct answers to this as follows: Du isst den Apfel. Ihr esst den Apfel. Sie essen den Apfel.

May 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/laura.paxt

It counts me as wrong when I put in "Du." It's frustrating.

August 15, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/TriTerp
  • 10
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

How do I know the "You" in this case is formal and not use Du? Is Du isst Apfel correct too?

August 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/sweilan1

Du isst Apfel is incorrect because it is missing the definite article. It should be Du isst den Apfel. It may sound a bit picky; however, in English it would sound off if you would leave out definite articles also - like "You are eating apple". In grammar exercises, you can use either Sie, du, or ihr. But bear in mind, in real conversational one needs to use them correctly in context or risk insulting the person with whom you are speaking.

August 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/TriTerp
  • 10
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

Thank you sweilan 1, I have a lot to learn :)

August 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/karolabq

What is the difference between Du and Sie?

March 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/sweilan1

Du is singular informal and Sie is formal (singular and plural).

Du is used only with friends and acquaintances.

Sie is used in all other cases. These words are not interchangeable in German culture. If you use Du with a police officer, you could be given a €600 fine for offending the officer.

March 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/karolabq

Thank you! And what Ihr stands for?

March 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/sweilan1

At this point of these lessons, think of ihr as being the plural of Du.

If you are speaking to a group of friends, you would use ihr. If you use Du with a group of friends, everyone would wonder which person you were addressing.

*Note - ihr is also dative case form of her. Don't worry about it now.

March 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/AnitaCrnog

Sie - she Du - you

April 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/sweilan1

Close. du - you (informal singular), ihr - you (informal plural), Sie - you (formal), sie - she and they.

May 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Heeeeyu

thank you so much

June 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/BenjaminGu38107

Everyone!! In this context, there is no way to tell if this is a capital "sie" for "they" or "Sie" for you.Its not as much of a mistake as just oversight by duolinguo, as they should provide context for these type of sentences.Click the link below.

http://imgur.com/YgpT6lG.jpg

[source: german.about.com/library/anfang/blanfang02.htm]

May 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Armidil0

"You are eating the apple." I put Du isst den Apfel and got it right, but they also say that Sie essen den Apfel is correct, but isn't that "They eat the apple." not "you"? Because it uses the verb essen with Sie, not isst. If they wanted "you" shouldn't it be Ihr esst?

January 9, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/sweilan1

"Sie essen den Apfel" means both "You are eating the apple" and "They are eating the apple". The first word in a sentence is always capitalized. To know if "Sie" means "They" or "You", you would need to determine this by the context of sentence.

June 21, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/tomshc
  • 14
  • 13
  • 8
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2

"sie", when capitalized within a sentence and is used with "essen", means the formal "you". I got that from the tips they provided besides the hearts on the top right hand corner.

January 10, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/sunnysjamil

Are these tips only available on the desktop version? I am using mobile.

April 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/slushAnSa

Is "essen" a iregular verb?

June 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/sweilan1

Essen is irregular.

June 21, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/slushAnSa

Thank you :)

June 23, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/nathaly.st

I just don get Sie what exactly does it mean?

June 21, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/sweilan1

Sie is the formal "you" both plural and singular. It is also used in the nominative and accusative cases. Lower case "sie" means "they" and "she" in both nominative and accusative cases. Remember, in German grammar as in English, the first word of a sentence is always capitalized. So if "sie" is at the beginning of the sentence, it would then be spelt "Sie". So if "Sie" is at the beginning of a sentence, one needs to look a the conjugation of the verb. Because the conjugation of the verb would be the same for "they" and "you" (formal, plural and singular), one would need to look at the context of the sentence to determine the proper translation of the personal pronoun.

June 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/chissel

I said "Du isst den Apfel" and got it wrong...It says the proper translation was "Den Apfel isst du" I don't understand why it taught me to say it the other way..

October 29, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/sweilan1

Both answers are correct.

January 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Siebenundzwanzig

I believe this exercise is focusing on the use of informal plural, but they forgot to tell us that. ;)

March 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/sharkyStuff

I don't know if this is correct, but I thought I should ask. I typed 'Sie sind den Apfel essen.' is that a proper sentence?

November 13, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/sweilan1

That is incorrect. If you check a few postings above this one, you will see an explanation. Not trying to be short, but typing on a phone drives me nuts.

November 13, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/sharkyStuff

Oh, thank you for telling me! I can understand. Always appreciate the help.

November 13, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/idaisboss

why is it not du bist essen das apfel?

November 15, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/sweilan1

Apfel is masculine in accustive case; therefor, the definite article is den bot das. The sentence is in the present tense so the conjugation of the verb essen for the verb Essen is isst. Remember du isst can be translated as either you are eating or you eat.

November 15, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/afr1can_ch1ld

Du is you and so is Ihr?!? I thought Ihr is They

November 17, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Siebenundzwanzig

"Ihr" is the informal "you", but I think "ihr" can also be the informal "they". Much how "Sie is the formal "you", but "sie" is the formal "they". Hope that made some sense.

March 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/sweilan1

There is no informal or formal third person plurals in German. Only second person is formal or informal. Informal singular include Du, dich, dir and plural are ihr and euch. Formal is Sie and Ihnen (both capitalized). Third person plural (English they and them) are sie and ihnen - both lower case.

March 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Siebenundzwanzig

The Sie usage is formal, and Du usage is informal; this I learned at the very start. Or have I mis-read what you meant? Kinda looks like you said what I said. xD Maybe I'm just tired.

March 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/sweilan1

You said "they" (ihr) could be informal. This is misleading because they is neither formal nor informal.

March 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Siebenundzwanzig

http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=1609526

That is not the only place from which I've seen the "ihr" form being described is informal, thus why I said the above. Or is it just "they" that is except from formality?

March 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/firepaw

Really, I think "Ihr" and "Du" are WAY too completecated! Who agrees?

November 23, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/sweilan1

If you think Du and Ihr are complicated, wait until passive voice, past tense, dependent clauses, and any combination thereof.

November 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Siebenundzwanzig

It's not too bad, ... be patient with yourself.

March 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/sweilan1

Actually it's very simple. Du is for one person and ihr is for more than one. If you are speaking to a group of friends and say "du", everyone will wonder which individual you are speaking to. If you use "ihr" when speaking to one person, they might wonder who else you are talking to.

Note: you could use ihr to an individual if you are discussing a group. For example, if a friend tells you he and his family were going someplace. You could ask him "when are going?" with either du or ihr. If you use ihr in this case, you are asking when the family (including your friend) is going. In summation, never talk about your family. ;-)

March 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/fb56653

for me the translation means one person is eating one apple . For you meaning more than one person i.e Sie essen den Apfel it means more than one person are eating apples not all eating one apple??

November 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/sweilan1

Sie essen den Apfel can also be singular. Sie is both 2nd person formal singular and plural.

November 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/fb56653

does this mean Du and Sie are two words for the same meaning or what is difference?

November 26, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/sweilan1

No. Du is second person informal singular. Sie is second person singular and plural formal. If you would use du to a group of people, everyone would be wondering which individual you were addressing. If you use du with a policeman, you just caused yourself some trouble. If you use Sie with a good friend, you've just insulted him.

November 26, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/fb56653

thanks for clarification

January 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/AnaStaSiaMoi

I HAD IT WRONG COS I WROTE ''IHR EST DAS APFEL

December 26, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/huntress2thebone

I dont get it! I thought Sie ment she?! They said that was the answer......?

March 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/SonikaMehra

Can anybody help me in understanding where to use "den" and when to use "das" also "die" as well? I am a little confused.

May 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/sweilan1

Let me take a stab at this. First of all, the words der, die, das, den are definite articles. First of all, all German words have gender. It is imperative to learn the gender with the word; for example, the word for apple is der Apfel - not Apfel, but der Apfel. So make it a habit to memorize the gender with the word.

Also remember der = masculine gender, das = neuter gender, and die = feminine gender. Plurals use die for a definite article.

When learning a German word, one learns the word's gender within the nominative case. Nominative case in sentence shows what the subject of a sentence is. In German there are several cases - nominative, accusative, dative, and genitive. I will skip dative and genitive for brevity.

Accusative case tells what is the direct object within a sentence. In grammar-jargon - it receives the action of the verb. In accusative case, masculine nouns use the definite article den. So if I read a sentence and it says der Apfel - I know that the apple is the subject of the sentence. If I see den Apfel, I know it is the direct object. Let me show you a few examples in English using der Apfel. Der Apfel is red. Der Apfel is on the ground. Der Apfel falls to the ground. Now here are some examples with accusative case. I eat den Apfel (the apple isn't eating, it's being eaten). I picked up den Apfel (the apple is being picked up, it isn't picking up something). The boy sees den Apfel (the apple is being seen, it isn't seeing).

Accusative definite articles are den - masculine, das - neuter, die - feminine, and die for plurals.

Remember, German does not use English grammar - it has its own grammar. In English we know the function of the word because of word order - subject verb direct-object. In German, only the verb needs to be in second place. To say I eat the apple, I can say either, "Ich esse den Apfel" or "den Apfel esse ich". Because Apfel has den for the definite article, we know that it is the direct object and not the subject.

Also remember that das can mean "that". Das ist der Afel (that is the apple). Since das isn't before a noun, we know it means "that" and not a definite article. I am going to skip how to explain sentences likes "that apple is red" - because you will learn that in a future lesson.

I hope this clears things up. If you have any more questions, feel free to ask.

May 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/abfab98

Why 'den' and not ' der' ?

December 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/HarshaJK

Why den and why not die ?

December 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/HarshaJK

Why den and why not die?

December 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/axel.duhar

What the ❤❤❤❤ is Den??

December 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/MiguelAnge958826

Why "den" and not "der"? Is it the same reason as "ein" and "einen"??

June 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/DavetheKnave22

I want to write "bist" every time I see an English "are." Habit will eventually stop me, hopefully.

September 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/DavetheKnave22

I want to write "bist" every time I see an English "are." Habit will eventually stop me, hopefully.

September 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Himiko1027Tetsu

I decided to have some fun and said 'You drink water' instead and it said I was right XD

October 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Himiko1027Tetsu

I decided to have some fun and said 'You drink water' instead and it said I was right XD

October 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Himiko1027Tetsu

I decided to have some fun and said 'You drink water' instead and it said I was right XD

October 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Mahmood533098

What's wrong with "die apfel"??

January 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/23_tafoya

Du and ihr both mean you?

July 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/sweilan1

yes

July 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/23_tafoya

Ihr and du both mean you?

July 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Adetutu18

WRONGG

March 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/muhamad649681

what the different between das,den,die.. and others! i confused!!!

March 14, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Sofia493335

So, den is the term for 'an', and ein is for 'a'?

March 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/RyanLeeCastillo

Why is it sometimes "der apfel" and other times "den apfel"? When did we start using "den" for "the"? "Den" was never part of the lesson over the word "the"; it only discussed der, die, and das.

April 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/sweilan1

Den Apfel - the direct object.

April 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Ananya208084

why the article is 'den'????

April 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/sweilan1

Because Apfel is in the accusative case.

April 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/SaiNikhil

When is den used?

May 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/sweilan1

Den is used for masculine nouns in the accusative case and plural nouns in the dative case.

May 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Eadie519122

Sie is she or they but definately not you. You plural is ihr and single is du

May 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/sweilan1

Wrong. The word Sie is second-person formal singular and formal. Also, sie is she and they.

May 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Muthuraman10

Difference between den and dien

June 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/sweilan1

I think you mean "dein" - which means your. Den in this sentence is the definite article for the accusative case. If you wanted to to say "You are eating your apple", "dein" would required the -en declension because it is in the accusative case.

June 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/MatthiusDiaz

What does informal and formal mean? Like an elder or someone in power?

June 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/C.K.8

Why is it den instead of the other "the"?

June 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/KingJayko
  • 25
  • 25
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 9
  • 9
  • 7

Den?

June 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Merjem819325

Apple is "der Apfel",why den Apfel??

June 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/sweilan1

Because "den Apfel" is in the accusative case.

June 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/SayanChatt17

There was no option to select Du isst den Apfel

June 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Lyn658363

please help me i want to understand, when is it necessary to use the "der" oder "den" ? why can't i write "der Apfel"?

June 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/AppyShan

Difference b/w den apfel and der apfel?

June 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/SelinLippl

I am sorry maybe someone asked the same question already ! why its not "der Apfel" :(

July 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/sweilan1

It can not be "der Apfel" because the apple is not eating. The apple is being eaten so it must be "den Apfel". "Der Apfel" - nominative case or subject. "Den Apfel' - accusative case or direct object.

July 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/SelinLippl

thank you so much

July 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Guy427892
  • 18
  • 11
  • 6
  • 185

Why 'Sie' if it refers to 'you'?

September 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/sweilan1

Sie means "you" formal singular and plural.

September 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/DefNotMatt

No. Sie, sie and du. Please amend

September 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/sweilan1

What do you mean - Sie, sie and du? Nominative case words for "you" are Sie, ihr, and du.

September 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/e31WIhns

When they didn't teach you a word and you have to answer it and its wrong "WHAT THE FFFFFFFF"

October 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Jenny461526

The correct answers are: Sie essen den Apfel, Du isst den Apfel or Ihr esst den Apfel. Ihr esst der, die or das Apfel is not correct.

December 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMat255311

None of the choices for this sentence are correct.

December 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Miwa510471

How does du isst make any sense? Isst is is eating, but you is eating doesn't work. What am I not getting?

January 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/sweilan1

Du isst definitely means "you are eating" or you "eat".

January 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/space_lemon1234

Why can't it be "Du esst den Apfel."?

January 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Bunni269653

When should i use den for Apfel? i thought i was suppose to use der.

January 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Rajat657536

Der is for masculine, die is for feminine and das is neuter. But what is "den" ??

February 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Rajat657536

Der is male, Die is female, Das is neuter. What is Den ??

February 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Emko733984

Is something wrong? I had 3 options for chose and no one was correct. There was "sie" twice and the thrid option was "du". There wasn't " ihr"

February 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/xociquetzal

My choices were: "Sie essen das Apfel.", "Sie essen den Äpfel.", and "Sie essen den Apfel." None of those mean "You are eating the apple"! I chose the one with correct grammar, and it said I was correct, but I wasn't really, because there was no correct option, was there?

March 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/xociquetzal

I guess that "Sie" can be a formal "you"? Did I miss that somehow?

March 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/PamMcCarty

What does "den" mean? It was hard enough getting straight "die," "der," and "das."

March 21, 2019, 5:10 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/sebastiant17

Den is simply the accusative form of "der"

March 21, 2019, 5:50 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/PamMcCarty

Why is it "den" Apfel and not die or der or das or whatever it usually is?

March 21, 2019, 5:48 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/sebastiant17

It is usually "der" Apfel, but in this case it is being eaten and is the direct object of the sentence. If you want to know more you can look up the Accusative case

March 21, 2019, 5:57 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/PamMcCarty

Why "ihr esst" and not "ihr essen," when "ihr" refers to PLURAL "you?"

March 21, 2019, 5:53 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/sebastiant17

That's just the way the verb is conjugated for this particular word. There's no real reason to understand, you just need to learn the way each verb is conjugated, but over time it gets easier. There's a great site called Verbformen, put any word in and it will show you how to use it correctly for each particular case

March 21, 2019, 5:56 PM
Learn German in just 5 minutes a day. For free.