1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Italian
  4. >
  5. "I have socks, but I have no …

"I have socks, but I have no shoes."

Translation:Ho delle calze, ma non ho scarpe.

December 24, 2012

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/countvlad

I used 'ho calze' and it was accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kilioopu

I used "... non ho nessune scarpe" since I recall this from my time in Bologna. Is this an incorrect usage?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LarrLarr

Why does it translate "I have socks" as "ho delle calze"? Why not just "ho calze"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/siebolt

Italian uses a construction with "di" and the definite article to indicate an indefinite amount. "Ho del pane" = I have (some) bread, "ho delle calze" = I have socks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/coloraday

You can read about partitive articles (delle in delle calze) here: http://www.italian-online.de/grammar/chapter6/6_9_4_partitive_article.htm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RonaldHaring

Thanks that was a very good article


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wiplala

I had ho calze and it was accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duojtlingo

it says plural next to calza which I thought was wrong but then submitted it, and it was wrong. the (plural) sign is misleading


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mel__Carter

I really wish there was some way of undoing typos... But I guess then people would cheat :/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lavmarx

I used "ho calzini" and it was correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fedepade

when you say "ho delle calze, ma non ho scarpe" in Italian mean: I have socks, but I don't have ANY shoes. And I say it because I'm Italian and I was trying to test out..

Learn Italian in just 5 minutes a day. For free.