"Finisco la torta entro cena."

Translation:I finish the cake by dinner.

December 24, 2012

56 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/FrankAtkin1

I finish the cake within dinner is not English. If a foreigner said it I would assume he meant during dinner.

February 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Libellule808
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It also translates as "by" in the sense of "before," as in "I finish by dinnertime."

August 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Jobroll
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Can we say: I finish the cake before dinner?

September 1, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/aykut123

Sure we can!

January 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Elena18

"Finish" as in "finish making" or as in "finish EATING"...?

March 17, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/marziotta
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Could be both. You would automatically think making, but it could be both.

March 17, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/robdb2
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Yeah, my mind jumped to 'eat the cake' first. But, maybe that's because cake is delicious. :)

November 29, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/3_pipit
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Yeah, me too. I thought eating, not making.

September 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/delirious_dee

It's kind of the same in English, when you think about it. Your mind jumps to 'make a cake', but it could 'eat the cake'.

March 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/craaash80
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Mine jumped straight to the latter :D I thought "aw, well, so much for your diet" indeed :D

March 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/TiagoMoita_PT
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I was expecting the only correct translation to be "I WILL finish the cake by dinner". Italians use the Present Tense to express also the near future, and the Present Tense in English doesn't make much sense to me in this example, unless I perform this action everyday... Am I wrong?

April 6, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Biochemistry

To help it make more English sense, consider that when you usually talk to people you speak in the past tense, but you would narrate in the present tense.

Imagine: "I finish the cake by dinner just as Sara arrives at my door, the bell announcing her call. I open the door and invite her inside."

You're just used to saying, "So, Jeffrey, last night I finished the cake by dinner just as Sara arrived at my door," when you speak with people.

July 6, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/AGaudiau
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You are spot on. I FINISHED the cake by dinner. I will finish the cake by dinner. I finish + noun seems like nonsense to me.

August 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/CorkyRingspot

This sentence is pretty much nonsense: no one (in the UK, at any rate) would say "I finish the cake by dinner"; if the sentence read "...by dinner time", I'd have understood immediately. Ironically, though, oddities like this are very memorable! NB, the following is from the Collins Italian dictionary: 'entro febbraio' = ' by the end of February'.

April 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/PryCharles

In texas by dinner could mean as dinner time started or during dinner before it ended

May 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/MishaDaSiberia

Thank you, PryCharles, for your comment. It has been useful for me.

August 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Blomeley
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Is "entro" here just an antonym for "dopo". I remember from when I learned italian previously that you could say something like "prima di cena" in this situation. Is it the same thing? Thanks

April 7, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/bogie11

I translated this as "during dinner". I have never heard anyone in English (USA) use the phrase "within dinner".

September 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/tunde777
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I lived in Italy for 5 years worked as a translater ever since, this sentence is not in italian....Finisco la torta prima di cena

August 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/temporalthings

entro vs. prima di?

April 8, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Blomeley
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I get the feeling that 'entro' is closer to 'by'; 'prima di' is closer to 'before'. Though i would be happy for a native speaker to confirm this if possible :)

April 8, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/igfs
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I think you are correct but I'm not sure.. Wondering myself in fact

May 7, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/claudio1947

Yes, it's possible.

August 26, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/h.maraia

No one in english would say "i finish tge cake 'within' dinner".

February 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/greggr
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Who finishes cake before dinner. Highly suspect.

October 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ShavaunTes

Someone with the right priorities!

December 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Shimona70

I bet my son could finish that cake off by dinner. lol

May 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/duegazze

I think TiagoMoita_PT is right. I have been told that it is normal to use the present for the near (or certain) future, while one who expresses a future action in future tense is indicating that he might and might not get around to it. "Finisco la torta entro cena." might respond to a question like 'Did you make the cake yet?'

April 7, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/jenny881121
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Does this mean "I finish making the cake by dinnertime or I finish eating the cake during the dinner?

August 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/trick_master

Which translation is more common for entro: before or by?

Thanks.

September 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/randomfatechidna

I feel like any sentence like this, with 'by x', should be in future tense. Eg., I will finish the cake by dinner. It's that much more confusing in the present tense :/

September 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/colorado3770

"I am finishing the cake by dinner" is also correct, yet they marked me wrong.

November 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/jeri123

i wish comments would drop off the discussion thread after a year.

May 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/malcolmissimo

The trivial ones, yes, but some are magnificent contributions to our understanding. So, unless you can think of a way to automatically tell the difference, no. I've even seen one (and it wasn't mine :-) voted negative by ignorant people.

May 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/jeri123

i agree

May 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/pedrevans

"I finish the cake within dinner"?? Never ever. That's not English. "I finish the cake by dinner" is also not English. "I'll finish the cake by dinner" also doesn't sound so brilliant. You can say "I'll finish the cake by dinner time".

October 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Dether

Agreed, "I finish the cake within dinner" isn't a valid English sentence.

December 22, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/pieronorfo
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why not "end" ???

April 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/faincut

I heard at first "Porta (door)" not "Torta (cake)" :\

June 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Mary_Incognito

Why "I finished the cake by dinner" is wrong? It's more correctly than "finish". And why duolingo recommend "finish off" too? That phrasal verb isn't useful here.

January 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/malcolmissimo

Finished is the past tense. The italian verb is the present tense, so you need finish (or "am finishing").

"Finish off" is commonly used colloquial English. It has overtones of (a) finishing the final remnants of something and/or (b) finishing something quickly and definitively. I would have thought there was a specific Italian expression for this. Native speakers please comment!

You may also come across "polish off", which is interchangable. It derives from the final cleaning of a piece of woodwork or metalwork, but is colloquially applied to anything

January 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Mary_Incognito

Thank you so much for your patience and help! I appreciate it!

January 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/juan89374

Great i have the correct answer word by word and it says it's wrong....nice

December 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Wim965210

Why is it not "I finish the cake at dinner?"

January 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/malcolmissimo

Because entro does not mean "at". Here's the definition in un dizionario Italiano , and I hope this resource and its Inglese friend save you from asking "why not?" ever again. https://dizionari.repubblica.it/Italiano/E/entro.html

January 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Wim965210

Thanks, but in my limited knowlegde of English the meaning is not exactly the same to the Italian phrase. By dinner means when the dinner actually starts, but here I think it means to finish the cake before dinner actually starts. Just confused. Sorry for asking trivial questions.

January 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/CarolineJanaitis

My first thought was like: I end the cake during dinner, i. e. while a tackle various courses of dinner there is always the cake to eat in between. Then my higher brain functions kicked in and I thought a more likely if temporarily challenged translation would be: I will have finished the cake by dinner.

February 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Anselmo913343
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For me she says scena not cena

February 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/duegazze

I translated it 'during dinner' also.

January 13, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/darshanm

I think the intention of the sentence is to convey the finishing of the cake before beginning dinner... In that sense, "during dinner" would be a bit misleading although I don't know whether the software marked your translation as wrong/correct...

February 1, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/JCForte

Entro is used more commonly to mean during or within The other usages are confusing and better translated by prima.

September 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/malcolmissimo

The Collins dictionary does not mention "during" anywhere. It gives several examples of both "within" and "by". In all cases the sense is effectively <in the time between now and> <time word or phrase>.

If this is accurate - and Collins normally is - then the problem is in the translation to English. It has got to be "dinner time" (or dinnertime, which is a correct abbreviation). Perhaps "cena" does carry the sense of a time?

September 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/sophianmweb

I used 'I finish the cake by dinner time' and it was marked wrong, but I would say that in English whether I was eating or baking the cake...

January 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Micheletto15

WHAAAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN " I finish the cake before the dinner" AND " I finish the cake before the dinner" ????? I CAN'T BELIEVE IT. -.-

December 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Freddowasher

No that's very poor English whatever the context.

May 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/sara_o

:-/

August 15, 2015
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