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https://www.duolingo.com/Redelll

Should I give up on learning my Dutch course here in Duolingo?

Redelll
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Ok! I want to learn dutch before but for now I want to focus on my German, It's to confusing though, I mix up some words and even the pronunciation when I am trying to speak the both languages.I want some advice not you haters, please RESPECT! thank you :)

3 years ago

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/wataya
wataya
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My personal experience: Learning two similar languages at the same time actually helps with understanding, but it severely interferes with production skills. So, if your main goal is to just be able to read books or listen to podcasts I'd say it's ok to learn them both. If you want to really speak the language it's probably better to focus on one at a time.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Erven.R

If you want to learn something easy: Dutch

If you want a well known language: German

If you want a challenge: German

But both German and Dutch have almost the same grammar except German is much more complicated (Grammatical cases and etc)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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Obviously if you are going to learn two languages that have similarities at the same time you are going to mix certain things up. That will even happen if you learn one first and another later.

Should you stop with one to focus on the other? That is completely up to you obviously. Another thing you can try is not mixing the learning of skills. One day do German, the other day do Dutch. In the end, what is best is very personal.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cowberule

It's possible to learn two languages at the same time; but it cant be German and Dutch. :\ Those languages are too similar, it will discombobulate you. You can study German and Turkish for example, and you will be less confused. It's because those languages are different. Different family of languages, different grammar, different difficulties.

I want to study Dutch and German too, so for now I am studying German, but in the near future I'll start studying Dutch. I recommend you to do as me and focus on one language; your call. :-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Grumpycat1
Grumpycat1
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i learn both, german with previous schooling and dutch from scratch......not confusing, mostly because i always put italian between them

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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I see you are studying Spanish. Try German through Spanish (if you feel comfortable enough with Spanish.) Or through Italian, if the course is available through Italian. You'll mix them up a little less that way, although spelling, especially will interfere. You'll also get good practice with Spanish, and learn phrases you won't in the English to Spanish course. I'm doing it that way, and it is working out pretty well

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pmagnuson
pmagnuson
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Duo'm both! Have fun. Getting mixed up no big deal, you'll be practicing the skill of keeping them separate.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JanellyC
JanellyC
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I have the same problem! I studied German in university and am living in the Netherlands now so am learning dutch and often confuse the two. I had the same problem when I tried to learn Brazilian Portuguese while living in Miami and hearing and using Spanish daily, but when I got Duolingo I realized I have retained a lot of all the languages despite a lil mixing here and there! I tested level 5 in Dutch, 7 in Spanish and 8 in German to begin with. I don't think you should give up any language ventures if you are learning and enjoying the journey!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fiddlerkrt
fiddlerkrt
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I think focussing on German initially is a good way to go. It allows you to repeat lessons more frequently and begin to get a 'feeling' for the language, which is difficult when you are practicing several others every day. Once you have gotten through most of the tree then you can begin to devote your attention to Dutch which will complement your existing German knowledge and vice versa.

I expect reaching level 15 in German and developing a strong foundation for it will assist you to avoid confusing the two. That being said, mixing up languages sometimes will happen even when you are fluent. I've caught myself saying Spanish words when I speaking to someone in French. I'm not good enough in Spanish to talk to a native speaker just yet.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/annika_a
annika_a
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I don't think anyone can give you any reasonable advice without you giving some more information...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/annika_a
annika_a
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OK, now we know more. With this information, I'd agree with Erven.R. I have learned both as foreign languages, and it is indeed hard not to mix them up, even if you know one really well...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/surky1

I'd recommend you to first finish your German tree, and then learn Dutch. Dutch is easier though (in my opinion).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elizabeth261736

Previously, I had decided to focus only on my French tree after I had finished the Spanish tree, but have decided to go back and complete some Spanish strengthening exercises at the same time. I'm finding that Duolingo is helping me to not confuse French and Spanish. After I finish the french tree, I may do French from Spanish to ladder. I've heard that helps.

Having to remember how to spell difficult or telephone in three different languages actually helps to untangle these languages in my mind. I do have some moments where I see fish while doing the french tree and immediately think pescado, then no, no, it's poisson. I started out knowing some French and Spanish to varying degrees already. These are not new languages for me, so it's possible that makes a difference.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Grumpycat1
Grumpycat1
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hello birdie.......so, dutch and german......you learn so many languages, i recommend, learn them separately, one day only one of them.... preferably with roman languages......just out of curiosity: you mix only those two? with such an impressive portfolio it must be tough.....

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Redelll
Redelll
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haha, i took other languages to refresh my mind from french xD

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Grumpycat1
Grumpycat1
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oh, my! xD .......this is so discouraging about learning french (once i tried from german.....ugh, i overestimated myself)......seriously, i should learn it someday, i just have different priorities about laguages right now

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/quriousking
quriousking
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When learning similar languages, like when I was learning Swahili and Zulu (from the Bantu family), I would confuse them left and right. It was frustrating; however, that is exactly why I'm so good at both languages now. When things are easy, they are easily overlooked (easy come, easy go), but when you struggle to get them, the rewards are usually much more immense.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sidneydew

Think about it first. Which one do you know more of? Which one do you like most?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelDeelwater
MichaelDeelwater
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In my personal view, the first objective for the acquisition of any language should be the completion of a good course or book (such as Duolingo). Even more complicated structures might be used in everyday language, so they should be used and practised as soon as possible. Doing two courses in parallel will postpone the completion of either. So my recommendation is, focus exclusively on German and complete it as fast as possible. Then, you can continue with improving your German by reading, watching TV/movies, talking, and continue with the Dutch course.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cahill3118
Cahill3118
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I'm pretty decent at German, and my Dutch is near the same level. I've noticed that Dutch and German probably share a degree of intelligibility. After all, if you go to certain Dutch provinces like Limburg or Groningen, they speak both Limburgs and Dutch Low Saxon, respectively. Both of these dialects are mutually intelligible with German.

As a result, I know a lot of Dutch just by knowing German, which aids me with my studies. In fact, it's nice for me.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WimXL
WimXL
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Hello HappiBirdie, I am a Dutch native and I am also familiar with German that I learned a long time ago. I rushed with ease though German on DL to regain and refresh the grammar which is more complicated than Duth grammar which in its turn is more complicated than English of Spanish grammar. You might start with German and when you think you get a hold on it start with Dutch in which you will recognize similarities. I experienced this when I started with Portuguese and Italian after I had a reasonable knowledge of Spanish.

3 years ago