"Yaşlı adam"

Translation:The old man

May 9, 2015

30 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ofelia9000

So what's the difference between eski and yaşlı?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

Eski is used normally with objects. Yaşlı is normally used with people. If you use eski with a person, it normally has the meaning of former, i.e. My old/former boss. I hope that helped! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/degironc

yaşlı means aged (with age)... can it be used for food, like wine or cheese, that gets more tasty by being properly preserved for a certain time ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ex_contributor

no those are eski too, eski şarap, eski kaşar (a type of cheese) etc


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Apahegy

What about something that is living but not a person? Is a dog/fish/cat/elephant/etc eski or yaşlı?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jocelyn.Willi

I'm guessing you use yaşlı for animals, because you are saying that they are aged...Right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alexvy86

For Spanish speakers, it might help to relate this to the distinction between "viejo" (yaşlı) and "antiguo" (eski), also used more commonly for people and objects, respectively. Even the fact that "antiguo" could mean former ("mi antiguo jefe" = my old boss).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sherahezad

Wow, i think its super that everybody is trying to help everyone with such respect and enthousiasm. Trying my best to learn basic Türkisch... after 15 years being with my Turkisch man its time to step it upp a notch! Fav words Baykuslar and Ördekler;) grtz from a dutchie


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Winter_Maiden

Is an old animal eski or yaşlı?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UzumakiHir

yaşlı. because it is living


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zahra372691

What is the difference between adam and erkik ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/isr10

Simply, "erkek"* means 'male'(gender) and adam: 'man'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Winter_Maiden

Does that mean 'erkek' can be used to refer to an animal, like saying that a particular cat is a male?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/isr10

I think so, because I have seen at many sites "erkek köpek" and "dişi köpek"(male dog and female dog). E.g.: http://www.petarkadas.com/petisimleri/K%C3%B6pek&cinsiyet=erkek


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daybreaker96

I think I understand:

Eski ~ inanimate (nonliving) Yaşlı ~ animate (living)

Am I correct??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ex_contributor

not really. it is best to say

  • eski: opposite of new
  • yaşlı: opposite of young

for example your "eski sevgili" is also animate :D (ex-boy/girl friend)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NailahDawkins

Can't I say eski for old, too? I get confused with this-


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

"eski" is the opposite of new.

"Yaşlı" is the opposite of young.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AtalinaDove

How rude would it be in Turkey to refer to someone as an old man this way? I know in some languages 'old man' can be affectionate, or it can be very rude.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aceroo___

"Yaşlı" reminds me that Jamala's eurovision song

Yaşlığıma toyalmadım Men bu yerde yaşalmadım

I know that's not turkish but crimean tatar, just saying these languages are alike :0


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/QIRIM.YOUNG

In support of endangered Crimean Tatar language, we have started the discussion and hope that it will help approve it by the Duolingo team.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/King_Irem

Would it be incorrect if one were to say 'old man' instead of 'the old man'. Does thsi effect the sentence in some way?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danika_Dakika

[This is just a noun phrase, not a sentence.]

"Man" is a countable noun in English, so you need to use an article, a plural, or both.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RasimCefer

Old/ yaşlı demek


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/velligoren

genel de eski ile yaşlı karıştılıyor.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/idimidi

Is it polite to call or describe an old man like this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MuQtaarAbd

Is every adjective came before noun in turkey


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danika_Dakika

Yes, modifiers come before the thing they modify.

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