"A Inglaterra é uma ilha."

Translation:England is an island.

September 22, 2013

37 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/aposes
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Not to be pedantic but the United Kingdom is an island (plus a bunch of smaller ones), England's just part of it.

September 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Davu
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Pedant mode on. :-) As you say, England is not an island, but neither is the United Kingdom. Most of England is part of the island called Great Britain (the largest member of the British Isles): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Britain

September 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/aposes
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I stand corrected!

September 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/JCMcGee

Double Pedant Mode: ....a group of Islands called Great Britain.

(I think Shetland, Isle of Man etc are considered part?)

March 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
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The Isle of Man definitely isn't. Great Britain is both the name of the island and the island group covering the territory of England, Scotland, and Wales, so Shetland would count as part of Great Britain by one definition.

May 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/rolosrevenge
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April 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/joaoduarte.com
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I was just thinking about placing this video here! Thanks! :)

July 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/stefaniehh
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UK = GB + NI

May 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterStockwell
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I'm sorry, this is a bad example!!

May 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr
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There should be a course on explaining how the UK is different from GB and what place Wales, England, Scotland and No. Ireland have there. Then we can talk about the difference between New England and the remaining 44 states.

July 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Luis_Domingos
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To be fair, in one of my first English lessons ever - in 5th grade - 10 year-old me was taught about this distinction (we're taught BrEn over here) - our schoolbooks had a map of the British Isles and its division into constituent countries together with their flags (I love geography and vexillology, so I was in my element) and how the flags of England, Scotland and NI are part of the flag of the UK.

That said, most people probably didn't pay attention to those classes, because we use "Inglaterra" as a metonym for the UK and GB regardless of what or whom we're talking about (just like no one will use "Países Baixos" instead of "Holanda", but I'd blame word length for that).

July 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterStockwell
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England = GB/UK is used commonly in France, too. The main reason for this, in my view, is that England is/was the dominant imperial force in the United Kingdom, and conquered those other annoying little countries, Wales, Ireland and Scotland. Wales was never a kingdom, always a principality, as far as I know, too.

Ireland managed to get most of their country back, except for 6 counties in Ulster that couldn't make up their mind (someone will correct me on this). The Scots finally got their parliament a few years back.

(Home rule for Essex, I say!)

July 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Luis_Domingos
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Wales and NI also have devolved Parliaments called National Assemblies (with less ample powers than the Scottish Parliament); and technically NI opted out of becoming a part of the Irish Free State when it was formed in 1922 (via a devolved Parliament created in 1920 and that was dominated for fifty years by the Ulster Unionist Party)

July 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/hhstrayhorn
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Like, for real though, don't say that to a Scottish person. Ever. Especially not in Scotland. There is so much resentment toward the English. I'm only British in heritage, but I studied abroad in the UK and when we visited Scotland and mentioned that the school at which we were studying was in England, disappointed looks abounded. They were even less impressed when I mentioned being mostly Scottish because I'm also English and Irish. The Scotts are proud, and unless you're prepared to make a strong case against them and risk forever being out of favor with the people to whom you speak, I recommend not offending their pride.

December 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterStockwell
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Don't "say what" to a Scot ?

December 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterStockwell
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hey I missed that! The forty four states. Is that a reference to a handgun other than a colt .45 ?

December 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr
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Apparently you haven't come across any Duo German sentences that mention the Sturmgewehr 44? I am sure that there are few of those amongst the 300,000,000 guns in the US...along with the M.44 Magnums.

December 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterStockwell
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There's an old blues song about a forty four, there's probably more than one. But the United states of New England strikes me as a good call, but I'm worried about what might happen if you removed all those good people from the union and what it might do to the balance of thinking.

December 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterStockwell
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Balanced thinking, what was I thinking about ?!

February 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr
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Well, you get Trump.

February 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/1orleans

Wow guys...all very interesting. Perhaps Duolingo should start a History course.

February 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/brunom.godoy
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I answerd "The england is an isle" and it was not acceptable...only "England is an isle" someone knows why?

February 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterStockwell
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There are a number of reasons:

  • England is not an isle/island
  • England is always capitalised
  • You never use the definite article before England, or any other country for that matter, in English.
February 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/joaoduarte.com
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I think Duolingo only considered the third option, though... :)

February 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/DaveBoss
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Peter, how about The United States, The Netherlands, The United Kingdom, The Republic of the Congo? There are others....

February 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Camilla-danesa
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These all refer to some part of the name that is not a proper name. For example: The states that are united, The nether lands, the kingdom that is united, the republic of Congo. There is no "THE" in front of country names like: Italy, Finland, Ghana, China, etc etc.

February 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/DaveBoss
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Fair enough, Camilla. If you're gonna differentiate on adjectives, then how about, The Saychelles (islands is no longer part of the name), The Vatican, The Sudan, The Ukraine, The Bahamas, The Philippines, and yes, even The Gambia?

February 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Camilla-danesa
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UKRAINE: (from mentalfloss.com: "Until a few decades ago, Ukraine was almost always referred to as the Ukraine. Then people started dropping the definite article, and now you almost never see it. What gives?

The 'the' has stirred up a lot of strong resentment in Ukraine. The feeling is that the definite article’s heavy use during the era of the Soviet Union by Russians and Westerners alike belittled, intentionally or not, Ukrainians, and demoted Ukraine from a country unto itself to a mere Soviet holding, a border region of the U.S.S.R.

Most historians and linguists agree that the name Ukraine comes from the Slavic ukraina, meaning “borderlands.”

VATICAN, the name 'Vatican' comes from the Vatican Hill (mons vaticanus) - a place of oracles.

GAMBIA ? got me

SUDAN - is now two countries: the Republic of South Sudan and Sudan (or northern Sudan)

Anyway, it's just my hypothesis, that some countries has the definite article before their name and others don't, depending on the origin of the name.

February 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/DaveBoss
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Emeyr- And the Bronx River was named after Jonas Bronck, a Dutchman from The Netherlands, who first settled the area. And I bet he was from The Hague in The Netherlands. Ha ha.

February 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr
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The Republic of the Seychelles.

February 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/DaveBoss
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Emeyr, OK, you got ME! Thanks.

February 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr
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You might be interested in this link:

http://english.stackexchange.com/questions/141826/why-does-the-sudan-have-a-the-in-the-name

I grew up hearing about "The Lebanon" (the article has since disappeared) and some theorize that the article attached to "The Gambia" is/was there to avoid confusion with Zambia.

NY has five boroughs, one being The Bronx - named after the Bronx river.

February 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterStockwell
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Yes, you got me.

February 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterStockwell
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But maybe it's now the Ununited Kingdom ?

February 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr
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Ununited Kingdom...Untied States of America...more untied than ever!

Yep...miss you and the banter: bate papo. Just returned from wonderful Montreal...amazing bilingual city with so many on bikes...bikes to rent everywhere. Civilized.

September 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterStockwell
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I miss the "ol'" days, before ... well, before, DL turned off "banter mode".

September 26, 2017
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