1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Spanish
  4. >
  5. "El secretario"

"El secretario"

Translation:The secretary

December 24, 2012

38 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jess785

I have done this series again and again and not once has it mentioned anything about minister!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anshul_tomar

Probably not, btw,

Minister = ministro


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/akastormseeker

It seems to me that maybe the Minister definition comes from the sample, "secretary of state." During my time in Spain, I have noticed that that kind of office is a minister, i.e. "minister of justice." I think, though, that if you are just talking about "un secretario", then it should just be translated to "secretary."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FJoyB

Yes, this should definitely mention "the minister" somewhere else before...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pepe0001

I guess we can't learn this until we get it wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Raylearn99

Huh? The minister? Isn't that el ministro?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anshul_tomar

yes it is.

Minister = ministro


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ghshephard

I guarantee you that "El Secretario" was not defined as a "Minister" prior to being asked to translate "El secretario"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Duomail

As I know, secretario is a lower range of employment/office than ministro. Likewise "secretary" and "minister", especially respect to the State, or church.
Secretary depends on minister, sometimes.
Secretary is said to be an officer, while Minister a senior officer, too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fairfax72

I thought minister was ministro or sacerdote. Where did secretario come from?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eloise23

31 Dec 2014 - Maybe because in Estados Unidos the position of minister is called secretary? Secretary of Defense = Minister of Defense. Just guessing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/djabea

Sometimes it's good to read the comments I'm forewarned. It's not the first time something like that happened.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Perlana

I thought secretary could also be desk?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlwynM

Are you thinking of 'escritorio' ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.Fink

It certainly can in English - I have a "secretary" in the front hall, and it was called that when it was in my grandmother's house before.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eloise23

I noticed that in the one sentence I encountered before, 'secretaria' - with an A ending - was used (Tú eres mi secretaria.) This stand alone noun, 'El secretario' ends in O. Perhaps that is the distinction between a hard working real secretary and the politician known as a minister. I don't know, I'm guessing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wolfycraft

Actually, the "a" meaning it is feminine, meaning a girl version, like chica or nina, literally mean girl. Things that end with "o" is masculine, like chico or nino, literally mean boy. But I just got this wrong because I can't spell secretary correctly. XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NaveelKabi1

Most of the time it will be feminine if it ends with a. If it is feminine, the article la precedes the noun, and the article el would precede a masculine noun. Some exceptions to the "a or no a rule" are: el mapa, la clase, and numerous others.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karateduk

i hate missspelling stuff :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SevenYearIllini

The minister as well? How were we supposed to know that. Oh well, live and learn, I suppose.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joel.hawth

In the estados unidos there was a president in the 1700 hunddreds who was the forighn minster to france much like secretary of state. Oh yeah the presidents name was thomas jefferson


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wayne647414

Jefferson was ambassador to France before he was appointed Secretary of State by Washington. He was elected President in 1800.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dani270567

Wouldn't el secretario be the secretary?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roger848226

I had the same thought and was going to report this as being wrong. But in reading the comments it (once again) shows that I do not know everything. How disappointing...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanAlvarez4

Secretario is secretary


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris127464

This answer is wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElaheR

If it's wrong, then how can we trust about other words?! :|


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pacodl

secratary is not a minister


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eloise23

Sì, un secretario es como un ministro. John Kerry es Secretary of State en los Estados Unidos de América, y funciona como un Ministro de Asuntos Exteriores. Êl tiene tambièn unos secretarios. Nadie les hace confundir.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoanneBenoit

I think the answer is wrong. I have several dictionaries and secretario never appears for minister.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/beorat

This is obviously the British translation. No North American would pick this over "secretary" when speaking of a high level government position.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caleb276737

Isn't secretario, a secretary??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArdentAshley

This should be translated as "secretary" unless it is more specific, i.e. "minister of justice"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmCrow

So... Since most secretaries are women, would it change to 'secretaria', or does it stay the same for both genders?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/enharville

Secretario is secretary.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KarissaTsa

why is it so confusing

Learn Spanish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.
Get started