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"Ólann mo thuismitheoirí beoir sa bheár."

Translation:My parents drink beer in the bar.

3 years ago

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/MaryLea11
MaryLea11
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I've never heard the construction in English that someone drinks 'in the bar.' You drink at the bar or in the pub. Is this an American way of saying it? Because it sounds horrible to my ear, so much so that it feels incorrect typing it in just to get past it. Even so, I keep finding myself typing 'at the bar' rather than 'in the bar.' A pub is a building, a bar is a piece of furniture.

I don't mind getting marked incorrectly if this is a case of American idiom trumping British idiom (the course is stated to be in American English) but if not, can I ask them in suggestions to accept 'at the bar' as a correct alternative? Because in the bar really does grate.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CynthiaRose20
CynthiaRose20
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In the US we say both "in the bar" and "at the bar" but which one you use depends on your location. We say "in the bar" to mean we are inside the building and "at the bar" to indicate we are near/next to the counter where the drinks are made or ordered; in American English the sentence means their parents are somewhere inside the bar (but not at the bar-counter) having a drink. You can also say "I'm going to meet my friends at the bar" and that would mean you were meeting them at the building and not the counter unless you were already inside then the meaning would be different.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alphalyrae
alphalyrae
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I (British) would say someone's either 'at the bar' or 'in the bar' if they're in, well, a bar, as opposed to a pub. (More likely I'd be saying 'in a bar', as in 'he'll probably turn up in a bar somewhere at 3am'.) If I'm specifying that they're by the counter then they're always 'at' the bar, never 'in' it.

In the first case I would say either preposition is correct, but it's probably wise to be as literal as possible while we're learning :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/becky3086
becky3086
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Well, this American put "at the bar" and got it wrong. To me "at the bar" and "in the bar" are pretty much the same thing.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mjkuecker1965

So, that's why our Paul is so confused. Leaving his wife, and cats, for the pink girls in the jumpers and becoming president of Ireland, and living in the fridge. :) Sorry, I'll be good. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eikoopmit

This particular sentence has nothing to do with Pól, though...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mjkuecker1965

I was implying that his parents were always drunk, it was a failed attempt at humour. :)

2 years ago