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  5. "Non è giusto."

"Non è giusto."

Translation:It is not correct.

December 24, 2012

36 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hkysonjr

Another correct answer is "It is not fair."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brunobruck

Yep, and I think it is the best one


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alanvoe

Both "It is not correct" and "It is not fair" are possible translations, only context can tell which one is better.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dennis264156

Seems that there should be a difference between "corretto" and "giusto," corresponding to "correct" and "just" in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alanvoe

There is no 1-1 match between these two Italian words and these two English words. Moreover, the meanings of "giusto" and "corretto" overlap.

  • giusto: right (= correct), exact, just (= fair), upright (= honest)
  • corretto: correct, just (= fair)

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erated8

How The Bloody Shakespeare Would One Extrapolate "Honest" From "Upright"? Those Words Don't Even Mean Similar Things...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SDL_1987

"It's not true" is false.. weird


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jmarzw

I think they mean "correct" not as true, but as in "the correct thing to do"- giusto really means fair or just, not true (which is vero)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erated8

As A Native English Speaker, I'd Likely Never Say "Correct" In That Circumstance, I'd Say "The Right Thing To Do", Or Oftentimes Just "Right".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lukman.A

It's not true = Non è vero.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/triletypetricek

"He is not fair." was not accepted. Shouldn't it be accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mrsticks1982

I thought "He is not right" was also correct. Duolingo does not agree with me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erated8

I Believe In This Case Right Is Used As In Morally Right, While Your Sentence, Atleast To Me, Seems To Imply Factually Right.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alanvoe

Yes. Please report it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.Franchomme

What about : - "It is unfair." ?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erated8

But "Unfair" Means The Same Thing As "Not Fair", Surely Both Translations Should Work?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alanvoe

Yes, but Duolingo usually prefers more literal translations when they make sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scandalousdan

I wish to lobby Duolingo to accept the best possible translation for this sentence: "It ain't right!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erated8

I Support This. Too Many Times I've Been Rejected For Using "Ain't" Instead Of "Isn't" Or "Aren't", And, Quite Frankly, I Believe That Ain't Right!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rbbekkhus

I tried to translate «Non è giusto» into «He is not fair». Couldn't an Italian child say that about his or her father?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alanvoe

Yes, it is a valid translation. Please report it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erated8

Honestly Seems More Likely Somebody'd Say That About Their Brother.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EricSando1

not right seems similar to not just or correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erated8

The Way I See It, "Right" Could Mean Either "Just" (Well, Sorta) Or "Correct", Or Even The Direction Right, But Definitely Not Multiple Of Those At The Same Time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tallman69

Thanks for the confirmation, guys. When I just saw this sentence for the first time, I was confused about the use of the word, "giusto." I thought I had misunderstood its meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharlesPit19

Why is "He is not correct" not accepted? How would one tell whether it is 'he' or 'it?'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alanvoe

The sentence could be about "him" or "it" indeed, but in English, a person is right and a thing (eg answer, fact) is correct. And "he is not right" = "non ha ragione", not "non è giusto".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roland900867

Would "it isn't ok." make sense? That's my immediate reaction each time I see this example, seems to me it's just perfect since it can mean "it isn't fair" and "it isn't correct" too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tallman69

I suppose the meaning matches, although ok technically is slang. Believe it or not, the term "ok" comes from a campaign slogan of President Van Buren in 1840. It's an abbreviation of the phrase, "orl korrect" or "all correct". It was popularized by Van Buren who was also known as, "Old Kinderhook." What amazes me is a campaign slogan from 1840 is now so pervasive in our language that you will hear the term used in other languages around the world. I have heard an Italian say something was "ok" in Italian. Language in fascinating.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erated8

I'm Pretty Sure The Etymology Of "Ok" (Or "Okay") Is Unclear, That Could Be It, But So Could Many Other Things, I Heard One Theory Suggesting It Comes From The Welsh Word "Cei", Meaning "Yes" (Under Specific Circumstances)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/peggy582366

Would just work as well


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erated8

Surely You Would Only Use "Vero" To Mean "Correct" Here? "Giusto" Seems To Mean More "Just" Or "Fair", Perhaps Used As "Morally Right", But Surely Not As "Factually Right".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John955060

"Right" and "correct" are the same thing! Why was I marked wrong for using "right"?!

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