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"I am at church, where are you?"

Translation:Ben kilisedeyim, sen neredesin?

May 13, 2015

41 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bambubr

Are the personal pronouns really necessary on the speech?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

Yep. When you have two subjects in the same sentence, the subject are absolutely required for clarity. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marc555350

This whole using pronouns or leaving them out business in Turkish seems highly arbitrary to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AkramNimer

But the suffixes already guarantee that clarity! Bizarre.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/earthtojeremiah

I think the personal pronouns are used here because there's a contrast involved. "I am here (where you are not), so where are you?" I saw this explanation about needing personal pronouns when there's a contrast in another discussion, and I thought it was relevant here. Maybe someone can confirm.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maguskrool

Thank you. I cannot say this with 100% certainty, but I feel like I've seen other sentences in Duolingo with two subjects where the personal pronouns were omitted. So, would "Iyiyim, nasılsın?" be wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JxArnaud

I'm pretty sure I've seen that too. But an explanation could be that the subjects are very obvious in a context of greeting someone.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bambubr

Thanks! Makes sense now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Connor503614

Would it be possible to further clarify why they're required? As others have pointed out the suffixes seem to indicate the subjects already, how come further specification is required?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WandaWinnipeg

If we can deduce that neredesin is used for 2p singular, why is the pronoun required?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yomalyn

AlexinNotTurkey answered this already :-)

One sentence with two subjects MUST have both pronouns.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stergi3

Kilisedeyim neredesin, marked wrong why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yomalyn

AlexinNotTurkey answered this already :-)

One sentence with two subjects MUST have both pronouns.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BronwenJon6

So "Kilisedeyim, neredesin?" is wrong. But would "Kilisedeyim. Neredesin?" be correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Salsmachev

Is kilise a general term that would include other temples (mosques, synagogues, etc.) or is it specifically a christian church?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

It is specifically a Christian church. A mosque would be "cami" and synagogue is "sinagog/havra."

A temple is "tapınak"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SRMoosavi

Is "Sen" mandatory before "neredesin"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrey581201

I did not include "Sen" and it was marked as wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yomalyn

AlexinNotTurkey answered this already :-)

One sentence with two subjects MUST have both pronouns.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CraigJamie1

Why can you have nisilsin on its own, but in this, you can't just have "neredisin'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hannerfish

AlexinNotTurkey answered this already.

One sentence with two subjects MUST have both pronouns.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Connor503614

People spamming that he's already answered isn't really helpful. As others pointed out it seems that the suffixes already imply what the pronouns are, so I think further explanation should be given as to why exactly they're needed in this case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mariane584083

Connor, to read all the comments before asking is VERY HELPFULL. Yes! AlexinNotTurkey answers CraigJamie's question quite simply, helpfully. We all have the same questions. I did'nt do it at the beginning, but now, i do it methodically. Very usefull. We also can read the TIPS before each lesson,....Should try it!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mariane584083

Why "ben" and "sen" in this sentence, when no risk of confusion by dint of the two verb's suffixes "im" and "sin"? Is'nt it to emphasize the two subjects? In French i shall say "I" am at church and "YOU", where are you?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hikaroto

my sentence was wrong. why "kilisedeyim, neredesin?." is Not a posible translation?.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hannerfish

AlexinNotTurkey answered this already.

One sentence with two subjects MUST have both pronouns.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anna212535

Ben kilisedeyim, neredesin? -WHY IS MARKED AS WRONG WITHOUT "sen"??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hannerfish

AlexinNotTurkey answered this already.

One sentence with two subjects MUST have both pronouns.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Morteza321

I translated this sentence : "Ben kilisedeyim,neredesin? " It's true but Duolingo said it's false!!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mariane584083

Morteza, perhaps it is true in spoken language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Siar_0

why is "Ben kilisedeyim, neredesin?" wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mariane584083

Siar, perhaps, without doubt, you will say it in that way in spoken Turkish, but not in writen, literary Turkish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/itanimazen

I said: Kilisedeyim, neredesin I guess It can be understood.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/esramsvs

"Kilisedeyeim, Neredesin" is enough


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mariane584083

esramsvs, AlexinNotTurkey gives a shiny, great explanation in his comment above, on the top of the comment. Should read it. Enjoy it!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmnaKaSamnaa

why is "Ben kilisedeyim, neredesin?" wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mariane584083

AmnaAmir, AlexinNotTurkey gives an explanation in his comment above, on comments' top. Should read it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaniaLeike

Why nerdesin not nerdesen?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AgusTriswanto

Why "Neredesin Sen" İs wrong?

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