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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArchitOjha

Untranslatable Words - In Pictures!

................................................................................................................................................................................................................Courtesy : Bored Panda.

Artist : Marija Tiurina ................................................................................................................................................................................................................

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All these are taken from : BoredPanda.com

URL Link : Click Here

May 13, 2015

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kippis

As a native Japanese I had never heard of the words "age-otori" and "baku-shan"...

Age-otori (上げ劣り) seems to be a word appearing in a novel written a millenium ago, and most probably died out in the 19th century or earlier. Till then, there was a ceremony called genpuku (元服) for boys that came of age (mostly around 12), where they had their long-grown hair put up (上げる ageru) and tied like adults. Age-otori, according to the dictionary, is when the boys look worse (劣る otoru) after the ceremony.

I can guess that the word Baku-shan (バクシャン) or Bakku-shan (バックシャン) was created in the first or second decade of the 20th century and that it was no longer used during WW2. It's a mixture of the English "back" and German "schön". Well, schön itself was used among young girls around 1900-1930 in the sense of "beauty". Oh my god, I apologize on behalf of our tasteless elders who thought of mixing English with German and later insisted that it was Japanese!

Kyōiku-mama (教育ママ)? Unfortunately we still have plenty of them today :-P

May 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArchitOjha

Nice to know more about the Japanese etymology and word origins. Motivates me all the more to go for Japanese learning as soon as it arrives on Duolingo.

May 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zerozeroone

"A schlemiel is somebody who often spills his soup, a schlemazl is the person the soup lands on."

Incidently, schlemazl is the second-hardest word to translate. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/3830521.stm

May 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kameleo

"Schlamassel" in German has a different meaning. How fun! :D

May 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jolynnedougherty

I suddenly have the urge to watch reruns of Lavern and Shirley.

May 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArchitOjha

Yes, thank you for sharing that word :)

May 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/konahi2014

These are awesome! thanks for sharing!

May 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luke_5.1991

I guess the translation for schlimazl would be "jinx". We've tried to pinpoint a translation for "pålegg" (not palegg) in our course... the best we could do was "topping", but butter is definitely not pålegg, for example. The German language has "Aufschnitt", which is a beautiful translation.

May 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annika_a

The påtår and tretår were also missing their circles (I have yet to come across one of these where all the Nordic languages included would be correctly spelled).

As a native Swedish speaker, I have never come across tretår, but would understand it in the context (and might just start using it now!).

May 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pont

I've never come across "tretår" either... and how is "påtår" untranslateable? It's "refill", not much difficulty there.

I also assume that "l'appel duvide" is meant to be "l'appel du vide". Strange that someone would spend so much effort on those pictures without even bothering to check that the words are correct.

dqxxmvyvoedn

May 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annika_a

I guess tretår could be threefill :-)

May 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/babbeloergosum

Hi Luke, actually "Aufschnitt" refers mostly to slices of sausage or possibly cheese that you put on your bread. I guess "Belag" would be the better translation of "pålegg" as it also refers to anything edible that you can put on a slice of bread or bread roll ;).

We have the yiddish loan word "Schlamassel" in German which means, in not so contemporary, but colloquial language, a messed-up situation. That's the best way I can describe it. I wouldn't say it, but it's not so unusual. To be in a mess - in einem Schlamassel stecken.

May 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LucasFaijdherbe

In Dutch we also have the Norwegian word: "palegg". In Dutch it is "beleg", you can see the similarity."Schadenfreude" is "leedvermaak" in dutch, and the yiddish "Schlimazl" is "ongeluksvogel". Awesome post!

May 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArchitOjha

Wow you translated quite a lot of them :D

May 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stigjohan

"Ongeluksvogel" has a partner in Norwegian, "ulykkesfugl". For you English speakers, it means "bad luck bird".

May 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gugel.hupf

"ongeluksvogel" I'd translateas "Unglücksvogel" in German. :-) A common Word for "Palegg" is "Brotbelag" in German.

May 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexWestco

What about the Dutch adjective 'gezellig'? Not a Dutch native, but it basically describes a nice - almost cosy or quaint - atmosphere. It's supposedly a word that can't be translated into English.

Great post, though!

May 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/girlpolyglot

They are so cool! Learned a new spanish word! Thanks!

May 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paz_Medrano

As a native spanish speaker, duende is an elf (the tiny creatures that work for Santa Claus, not the warriors from Lord of the Rings).

It is also used in Spain as the feeling that a viewer gets from seeing a beautiful flamenco dance performance, but it is reduced to flamenco dancing, not to other arts or paintings as seen in the picture. The term is not used in Central or South America, I don't know if it is used in any other country than Spain.

May 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArchitOjha

Oh so it is more related to dance than paintings! Thanks for the insight :)

May 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dwduo

I recognized schlimazl from the Laverne & Shirley theme.

May 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/frankenstein724

These are all interesting, and the art is fun, but one of my pet peeves that I can't seem to stay away from is the idea that these words are "untranslatable". The sheer fact that there are accompanying English words to describe the meaning means that they are not untranslatable, it simply means that they can't be translated as succinctly.

"If it can be said, it can be translated"

May 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeIouch

Thanks that's so interesting! The only one I was aware of was "schadenfreude" - though I think we've adopted this into English a bit.

May 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ningaspanish

Haha...great post! :)

May 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArchitOjha

Thank You :)

May 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Berniebud

I'm confused, I thought "Schadenfreude" meant a shared feeling of embarrassment from another.

May 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annika_a

Schadenfreude has been taken over into English: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/schadenfreude and means "a feeling of enjoyment that comes from seeing or hearing about the troubles of other people".

What you thought of is plaatsvervangende schaamte in Dutch and myötähäpeä in Finnish, sometimes translated as vicarious shame in English, where you are ashamed on behalf of someone else, often because they don't have the good sense to be ashamed themselves.

May 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/railrule

In spanish 'Vergûenza ajena' (alien shame)

December 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jolynnedougherty

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schadenfreude According to Wikipedia, it translates from the German as harm-joy and means taking pleasure from the misfortune of others. I often run across it but can never remember what it means.

May 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caesarino

What you're thinking of is Fremdschämen, if I remember correctly.

May 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/doktorkampi

Is Marija Tiurina related to Ella Frances Sanders? I've just bought a book from hers called "Lost in translation", and it is about unstranstable words (to English). Most of them are exactly the same words that this artist has chosen.

May 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/babbeloergosum

We have "palegg" with exactly the same meaning in german. It's called "Belag". I didn't realize it's so special :D I mean you have to have a general term for the stuff you can put on a slice of bread or a bread roll. Right?

May 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/viola_power

This reminded me of aufschnitt. cold cut is too broad and could mean roast beaf and sliced turkey, but summer sausage and pepperoni doesn't work too well either.

May 16, 2015
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