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"My brother is independent."

Translation:Tá mo dheartháir neamhspleách.

3 years ago

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/MaryLea11
MaryLea11
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I'd love to know the etymology behind 'neamhspleách.'

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

neamh is a negator. so it's literally not-dependent

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaryLea11
MaryLea11
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Thank you! Now that I know that it will help with future words. GRMMA

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mpbell
mpbell
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The S in "neamhspleách" is pronounced as broad because neamh- is a prefix, and S is always broad word-initially before m, p, or r, as in the root word "spleách."

(Correct me if I'm wrong!)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/forsaken.quantum
forsaken.quantum
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Why is it "Is mo dheirfiur neamhspleach" for sister but "Ta mo dhearthair neamhspleach" for brother?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaryLea11
MaryLea11
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Actually, that is an interesting question! I think (someone will correct me if I'm wrong) that this is a case of the copula meaning something subtly different from the regular verb to be? As in 'tá mo (etc)' means that the brother is only temporarily independant, where the sister - 'is mo dhieirfiur' is considered temperamentally and consistently independant.

My understanding is that 'tá' refers to temporary states, where the copula refers to permanent states.

I could, of course be wrong.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/forsaken.quantum
forsaken.quantum
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That is an interesting and useful idea. However, what bothers me in particular is that the "Tá" construction is accepted for "my brother" and "the cat", but not "my sister", while the "is" construction is accepted for "my sister" but not for "my brother" or "the cat".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaryLea11
MaryLea11
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Again, I'm not sure - I think that the 'tá' construction should be accepted for 'my sister' as well, but then, so should the 'is' construction in either case. It seems to me that the course designers haven't been able to reflect the subtleties of the Irish tense system.

There are, after all, extra present tenses and past tenses in Irish which don't exist in (non Hyberno) English. It's a problem when a language is nuanced in different ways to the language that we are learning from. (Sorry, I am tired, and probably not expressing myself well.)

But, I think that the subject of the sentence has no impact on the way the verb is constructed in this case. It's not that the verb changes because of the gender of the subject. It is that they are testing us here on the 'is' form, even though there is no direct translation that differentiates between 'is' and 'tá' when moving between Irish and English.

Context would help, but these exercises give us none.

In other words, I think your translation was correct, and you weren't given enough information as to the tense, or mood, etc, that the verb was to be translated into.

(Please, Scilling or Galaxy are bound to have more information than me - I hope I haven't mislead you!)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TuathaDeDanann

I'm pretty sure that "is mo dheirfiúr neamhspleách" is wrong on multiple counts. Predicative adjectives (as this is) use bí, if I'm not mistaken, rather than the copula. In addition to that, the copula can't be followed by a definite noun, such as "mo dheirfiúr." To use the copula here, it would have to be, "Is í mo dheirfiúr neamhspleách í," or perhaps, "is sise mo dhéirfiúr neamhspleách,"* both of which would mean "this is my independent sister."

*not sure about the later.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LinguDemo
LinguDemo
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Neamhspleách. How do you pronounce that? Is it... nowsh-plauch (ch as in Loch Ness)?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Its pronunciation in the three dialects can be heard here.

2 years ago