" uisce riachtanach."

Translation:Water is necessary.

May 14, 2015

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/mjkuecker1965

I don't find raichtanach in the Irish dictionary. The closest I can match for Water is required / necessary would be Tá uisce oiriúint. Someone help me out here?

May 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

riachtanach is the first match on 'focloir.ie' for necessary.

May 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Ruairi21

Why isn't "necessary" a category? There are necessary things and there are not necessary things. Why doesn't this sentence call for the "Is..." form?

October 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Because 'necessary' is describing 'things' in your example. You can't say 'it is a necessary', which is what is would be.

October 21, 2015

[deactivated user]

    Maybe Is gá é an t-uisce?

    January 13, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/scilling

    It can be found here. Make sure that the I comes directly after the R.

    May 14, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/mjkuecker1965

    Is that weird? I was looking on foclior.ie the other evening, and nothing came up. GRMA, again. You two are the best. :)

    May 14, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/Bush6984

    Is GRMA a commonly accepted Irish way of abbreviating go raibh maith agat, or only something others have come up with?

    Or, in other words, if I were to type that on non-Duo forums or something, would it be just as commonly accepted/understood as "ty" or "tx" is in American text-speak??

    May 2, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

    It's part of modern "text-speak" in Ireland - you probably wouldn't have encountered it 20 years ago, but with the rise of both internet forums and text-messaging, it's pretty common now in those contexts. (It helps that go raibh maith agat is actually pronounced "gorumaw" by some speakers when speaking quickly).

    A very quick search of the daltai.com forums turned up this example from 2005 - I'm sure it wouldn't be hard to find earlier examples.

    August 16, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/becky3086

    Even when I look at what the words mean, I can't decode the sentences.

    May 8, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/Ruairi21

    Are you talking about the sentence which is the subject of this commentary?

    Tá form sentences start usually with Verb then Subject. So "Tá uisce" translates as the English verb "is" and the English noun "water" as the subject of the verb. English usually is Subject Verb, so the usual translation will be, "Water is..."

    May 9, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/becky3086

    I have a really hard time with "Ta" because it can mean different things in English and I get really easily confused when I see it. When a sentence starts with "Ta" I just am at a loss on how to translate it. Thanks for this though, I will try to remember to translate it to "Is" and see if it works first. By the way I would love to know how to get the little accent mark (fada?). I have tried several ways, they just never seem to work on this laptop. I tried changing the language to Irish, tried "Alt plus the letter (the instructions actually said "AltGr+the letter" but there is no AltGr on my keyboard.)

    May 10, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/Ruairi21

    Hmm. "Tá" can mean "are" for plural subjects. E.g. - Tá lucha donn nó liath. (Mice are brown or gray.) Also, when prepositions are involved, the English "is" goes away. E.g. - Tá uisce agam. translates upon first pass as, "Water is at me." This is understandable but awkward English, so it is transformed to, "I have water." Each prepositional pronoun works a little different, but generally you can still translate the Tá as "Is" until you get tired of it and just jump to the smoothest sounding English meaning.

    While Duolingo is an amazing program, and prepositional pronouns and most things like it are explained in the Tips and Notes section at the beginning of each section, you still might benefit from good grammar books, grammar websites, small group comhrá face to face or on Skype, or an instructor.

    In Windows 7, I select the United States - International keyboard and then the RIGHT HAND Alt key with the vowels includes the fada - áéíóú.

    Warning - if your solution involves the Irish language keyboard, the right hand alt is still important, but you may want to change back to the English after Irish because the " and the @ are swapped.

    May 10, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/clairelanc3

    Where is that "tips and notes section"? I'I've doing DL for a few months in Irish,Hungarian, Hebrew and Russian and never found it!

    June 3, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL
    Mod
    • 1133

    On the website, there is a little light bulb icon next to the "Start" button for most skills. Click on that icon to read Tips & Notes for that skill.

    June 3, 2018

    [deactivated user]

      Ctrl + Alt + vowel used to work for me on a Windows laptop.
      Option + vowel works on a Mac for me - tá, sé, sí, bó, cú.

      May 10, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/scilling

      Under macOS, the necessary keystrokes are ⌥E (Option + E) then the vowel.

      April 1, 2019

      https://www.duolingo.com/clairelanc3

      Who could explain clearly when we use "tá and when" is... é/í/... I try to figure out but seem to place them at random,often correctly but why???

      June 3, 2018

      https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL
      Mod
      • 1133

      The simplest explanation is that you use the copula is when using a noun/pronoun to categorize or describe a noun/pronoun, and you use the verb ( in the present tense) when using an adjective to describe a noun/pronoun.

      So you have Is feirmeoir mé - "I am a farmer" because you have a noun and a pronoun (feirmeoir and ), but Tá mé fliuch - "I am wet", because you are using an adjective (fliuch/"wet") to describe a pronoun (/"I").

      Riachtanach is an adjective, so you use in this exercise.

      That's the simplest explanation. The copula can get more complex than that, but that's the starting point.

      June 3, 2018

      https://www.duolingo.com/clairelanc3

      Thank you!!!

      June 3, 2018

      [deactivated user]

        There is a good explanation of the copula (is) in this post

        June 3, 2018
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