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Learning French from Spanish?

Hello, I was wondering if it would be easier to learn the French language from Spanish or from English. I can't seem to decide. Spanish and French are both romance languages, but English has had great influence from the French, ahem; the Norman Conquest of England. What do you guys think? Please explain too, I don't want the, "dO IT F40M eNgluSH p0lx"(Really emphasizing it here). Ok, thanks! ¡Adiós!

3 years ago

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/PeacockBlue
PeacockBlue
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There's also a popular technique of laddering in language learning, where you learn your 2nd foreign language, from the 1st recently learnt foreign language. So learning French through Spanish will strengthen your Spanish skills. I'm currently at beginner level in Italian, that I'm learning through both Spanish and English, and that helps me make more & stronger connections and better understand both Spanish and Italian (sometimes even English). You could try both reverse trees later too.

If you need help in organizing your French and Spanish learning, then you can download the userscript: 'Duolingo Course Switcher' from Tapermonkey. Really handy tool to switch between domain languages if you're thinking of learning from a different language than English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rakghoulish
rakghoulish
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Doing from Spanish will help you with both languages, I've heard, but you will have to think from Spanish. If you think you could do it I would. The easier way would be with your native language.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YYismyLanguage

Ok, thanks!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vcel10
vcel10
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That's why I enjoy learning French from Spanish . . . it forces you to think en español.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YYismyLanguage

By the point I start learning French I should have had 5 classes of it in school and a golden completed tree, so hopefully I would be able 'to think' in Spanish. It truly is possible though, You will always think in your native tongue, it will just be quicker, and I can basically practice my Spanish while learning French. Edit: Basically what PeacockBlue said. Thanks. :P

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vcel10
vcel10
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Try both.

My goal is to learn Spanish. I'm learning French (slowly) through both languages. I usually do the lessons in Spanish first then later on I'll do them in English. Keeping my Spanish trees properly gilded is my top priority.

Spanish and French obviously share some cognates which is pretty helpful. I learned some new Spanish words taking the French course. I plan on doing the reverse tree for both. English for French speakers and Spanish for French. With that said, I find French from English easier but learning French from Spanish supports my language learning goals.

¡buena suerte!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YYismyLanguage

Thank you for your opinion! :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StarFreedom2

My experience: I am a native English speaker (U.S.) I took French in high school, and a couple semesters in college, and did pretty well. By that time I was moderately fluent. Some years later--after having nearly-zero opportunity to practice it-- I forgot most of it. Then I tried a Spanish class. That went well, and many of the words were similar. I found Spanish spelling, grammar, and pronunciation easier. But I struggled at times to avoid using French words when I was supposed to use Spanish.

For me, I feel they could augment each other, but I would have to try not to get the trees "tangled." Maybe others have less trouble with this. They are probably more like each other, than English.

Spanish professor to me: "(A yes or no question in Spanish)?" Me: "Oui." Him: "NYET!" (Russian for No.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ejschlapp
ejschlapp
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I finished the Spanish from English tree a while ago and reviewing it got less and less interesting (it needs more content). I can probably get more out of immersion and watching Univision and Telemundo at this point.

I started the French from Spanish tree several weeks ago and using Duolingo became fun again. The grammars are closer to each other than either is to English. As I progress through this tree, I encounter more Spanish vocabulary that isn't in Spanish from English. I don't seem to have any issues with confusing Spanish and French vocabulary. It's good to get away from using English as a crutch.

I also dabble with the following trees. Spanish from French, French from English, Spanish from English

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tammythree

I have 5 years of French and then started Spanish several years later. I thought I'd forgotten French. Then I started getting the languages mixed up. The languages are close enough to cause problems. French has not helped me in learning Spanish.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pabos95
pabos95
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Spanish and French are somewhat similar, but not as similar as Spanish and Portuguese. Of course doing French from Spanish will help you with your spanish, so if you want to improve your spanish is a good idea. Just don't expect that French will be very easy because you know spanish (it can help you with some words, but not with the whole language).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YYismyLanguage

Probably more than English though.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pabos95
pabos95
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Yeah, of course.

3 years ago