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"Ders programı nerede?"

Translation:Where is the course schedule?

3 years ago

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/brjaga
brjaga
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In American English, I've only ever heard this called a "[class] schedule". I had to come to the comments to figure out what "lesson program" meant. "Timetable" makes sense to me, but still makes me think of trains.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexinNotTurkey
AlexinNotTurkey
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Hmmm, even when you are at college? I definitely said "course schedule" then. The latter two are more British in usage :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brjaga
brjaga
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Yes, "course schedule" works too, although in general, "course" and "class" seem pretty interchangeable (except that a single meeting of a course is always called a "class" in my dialect, e.g. "I have class this morning", but never "*I have course").

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SamanthaRa532683

Lesson plan? I've never encountered "lesson program " at least in American usage.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexinNotTurkey
AlexinNotTurkey
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It sounds quite awkward to us Americans, but it is a real thing. :) We accept it, but not as the best answer.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/leicaMirror

It is also commonly called "timetable"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexinNotTurkey
AlexinNotTurkey
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Hmm...I will ask some friends, but in my English, timetable can only refer to things at train stations or for television. Thanks for the heads up.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jzlcdh
jzlcdh
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In British English we say timetable but perhaps in the US you do not. However in a school the student's timetable would refer to all their different lessons shown in one table. I don't think this really matters in this "Turkish for English speakers" course so long as we understand the meaning of the Turkish.

So basically I think we need to know whether "ders programı" means a table showing the times of all the child's lessons for all subjects for the week (or in the case of a teacher all the lessons they teach to all students in a week). Or whether it means "syllabus". I think it means the former - am I right?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marwanmedh1

Why not dersin programi?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexinNotTurkey
AlexinNotTurkey
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What you wrote would be a possessive phrase (the class's schedule). This is just a simple noun phrase so no genitive case is used :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/londoncallling

Even after reading all the comments I'm unsure what a lesson program or course schedule is. Is it what we call a timetable in the UK, which is basically the schedule of all your lessons for the whole term (semester)? Or is it more like a syllabus, which is the overall plan of the topics you're going to cover in the lessons?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SuhailBanister

Ders! Yine Arapça, değil mi? Knowing French and a little Arabic from one's youth really helps forgetful people like me assimilate a tough new vocabulary!

4 months ago