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"Voor de zomer zal hij naar zijn familie toe zijn gegaan."

Translation:Before the summer he will have gone to his family.

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3 years ago

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/NirRL
NirRL
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"For the summer he will have gone to his family"
"Before the summer he will have gone to his family"
Those two have different meanings. Is there a why to distinguish between them?

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kristynka
Kristynka
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Good question. Anyone, please?

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Reply11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xMerrie
xMerrie
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The Dutch sentence would be the same. It would be clear through context. :)

2
Reply11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/andreas.im
andreas.im
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why the two zijn?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NirRL
NirRL
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Can someone answer this?

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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  • zijn familie = his family
  • zal zijn gegaan = will have gone
2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NirRL
NirRL
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Bedankt!

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/crlight
crlightPlus
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Are there times when naartoe is necessary instead of just naar?

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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I can't think of a situation right now. But whenever there's another "naar" in the sentence or when you want to make sure you're not misunderstood, it's probably better to use "naartoe" since that doesn't have any other meanings, "naar" does.

2
Reply13 years ago