https://www.duolingo.com/RyckRichards

Why not add more exercises such as "conjugate the verb, decline these nouns, correct these sentences, etc"?

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9/24/2013, 11:57:38 PM

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Samsta
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Especially like the "Conjugate the verb" idea!

9/25/2013, 2:08:33 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Christine1999

I like the sentences correcting :). I think that it would make us (at least me) more attentive.

9/25/2013, 3:44:32 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/duolinguosity

by the way, major respect to you for hitting level 14 and having a 67 day streak. I'm not sure if thats unusual since I haven't seen many other peoples stats, but that still really impressive from where I stand :)

9/25/2013, 2:24:43 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Samsta
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Well thanks! I bet you'll be there in no time! But if you think I'm impressive, check out pinkodoug's account: http://www.duolingo.com/pinkodoug Streak of over 230..insane. haha

9/25/2013, 3:26:21 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/_pinkodoug_
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o.O

9/25/2013, 4:19:06 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/ych0130517

I need this! Those verbs really make me sick lol

9/28/2013, 4:21:12 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/duolinguosity

This gets at a gripe I have with the entire "learn through context" approach. No one who speaks their native language well learns through context, but instead you spend a great deal of time learning through exercises done in school. These services often bill themselves as allowing you to learn the language like a child learns it, but children often construct awkwardly worded sentences, and adults are there to explain to them why their word-choice was incorrect. Furthermore most people learn their native language in school right through high school and even into college. There is a clear difference in the way a college graduate speaks, and the way a high school dropout speaks, and it isn't just vocabulary, but grammar as well.

9/25/2013, 2:23:35 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

"These services often bill themselves as allowing you to learn the language like a child learns it, but children often construct awkwardly worded sentences, and adults are there to explain to them why their word-choice was incorrect. Furthermore most people learn their native language in school right through high school and even into college."

The English speaking folks that struggle the most on Duo seem to have most of their problems because they don't understand the basics of grammar in English.

9/25/2013, 1:28:01 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Wirelizard

True, that. I'm firmly in that category, and have to keep reminding myself that I don't understand formal grammar in my native language, never mind German. (I still think the whole grammatical gender thing was invented as an evil trick to play on language students, mind you...) :)

9/25/2013, 8:28:43 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/brg71
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Me too. Although I find that learning a new language (French) has forced me to learn more about my native language (English).

9/25/2013, 11:49:01 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/frenchpog

French children spend hours studying 'conjugaison' in class.

9/27/2013, 3:10:48 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/ironyisoverrated

This isn't exactly true. Young children primarily learn language from listening to their environment and from interaction with other children. Even without formal schooling, almost all children will come to learn and use a fairly sophisticated set of linguistic rules. Think of the daily life of a pre-school child. They spend a lot of time asking questions of adults, expressing their desires and making observations. More crucially though, they are constantly hearing language, from parents and other adults, the media, and most importantly, while engaging with their peers. These peers have been doing likewise, so common patterns of language are naturally reinforced from repetition, while individual misunderstandings or quirks tend to fall away from disuse. Certainly once they reach school, it greatly helps to extend vocabulary, solidify concepts and structure language so that children can understand more complicated subjects and then begin to express their own ideas precisely. However, probably only 15-25% of class time is devoted explicitly to the instruction of native language grammar and vocabulary. The rest of the time, children are learning about math, science, technology, history and society. The material in these subjects will tend to follow standard accepted linguistic patterns, so these patterns are further crystallized in the child's mind. I'd say that most of the time, context really is the key because the mastery of language comes more from a diverse multitude of individual refinements that are barely noticed as they are incorporated for later use.

9/27/2013, 3:03:12 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Chartreux

I'd be happy with gender specific vocabulary flash cards or a conjugated verb spreadsheet that could be exported... something for god's sake!

9/25/2013, 7:08:13 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/RyckRichards
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Agreed! lol

9/25/2013, 7:29:01 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Desertxsnow

I agree! Conjugation practice may be a pain, but it serves a purpose and helps get the way to form sentences engrained in your head. I fear I may have issues with Spanish if I continue and realize down the road after being spoon-fed the answers in that same lesson, I suddenly need to remember "to write" in its nosotros form (escribimos) and just wasn't drilled in my head enough, so I have to go to the internet for help. It feels like cheating that way. :/

9/25/2013, 9:07:14 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Dr.Manhattan95

The more variety of excerceses, the better! I back you up 100%.

9/26/2013, 5:37:24 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/RyckRichards
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Awesome!

9/26/2013, 3:41:28 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/mahmoudjo

very good idea

9/26/2013, 10:10:22 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Libby_S
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I agree. It's much easier for me to learn conjugations if I can see all the persons/numbers at once, rather than being exposed to them individually.

9/26/2013, 10:49:36 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/THE_G_UNIT_1998

yeahhhh mate

9/26/2013, 1:47:38 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/TheEugenius
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Awesome idea :D

9/27/2013, 1:50:04 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/ryan5

Yeah, there seems to be a lot of vocabulary building, Most of the words I know are nouns, it is a bit overwhelming, but I haven't learned past or future tense yet, which is a great hindrance to actually speaking the language. After this much time, one should be able to have small conversations, instead it is mostly odd phrases, whose context I can only guess.

9/29/2013, 5:03:58 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/redneckray

There are several philosophies of language learning. Nobody knows the perfect way, that's why there are several ways to learn a language. Why anyone who has never studied the discipline of language learning would ever hazard an opinion is like going to a doctor and telling him he has mis-diagnosed your problem and suggest your own remedy. I simply don't understand it. If you are ignorantly opinionated there are enough different learning systems to accommodate you.

DuoLingo is what it is and it's pretty damn good, but so are other language learning schemes.

The difference is that those who choose DuoLingo are mostly people who are disposed to successfully learn a language and many have already suffered from the school courses that imposed the structured learning of grammar and found it unsatisfactory.

One mans poison is another mans meat.

9/29/2013, 2:24:55 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Salxandra
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I agree. It's really easy to say that Duolingo would teach a foreign language better if it included "fill in the blank", but it's much harder to back that up with evidence.

Indeed, when Duolingo was just started, its creators asked the experts...

Quotation from Luis von Ahn: "At the beginning we talked to many experts and we read books, because we didn’t know much about teaching languages; but after a while we realized they didn’t have much answers either. If we asked specific questions, the answers weren’t based on actual measurements, only on their general philosophy. So we started doing experiments, because we all the users we have, we can easily do test and find out the best moment to teach plurals, for instance." http://thenextweb.com/la/2013/06/09/duolingo-founder-and-captcha-creator-luis-von-ahn-talks-android-crowdsourcing-and-ab-testing-interview/

So, the experts don't even know the best way to teach a foreign language. And, unlike other teaching modalities, Duolingo, at least, is running tests to figure that out.

I'm not saying we shouldn't suggest things to Duolingo, but rather we should avoid the hubris of thinking we know better. We may actually know the best way for one's own self to learn, but we don't know the best way for others to learn.

9/29/2013, 2:58:58 AM
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