"Je prends mon appareil."

Translation:I take my device.

December 25, 2012

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/BillofKempsey
  • 25
  • 16
  • 15
  • 14
  • 10
  • 6
  • 4
  • 2

"appareil" is quite usually used for "camera" - but that was rejected.

Reported.

March 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/jytou
  • 18
  • 17
  • 14
  • 13
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 531

I hesitated too - but went for the safer "device". The fact is that yes, in an unambiguous situation eg you're a photographer, someone just called for emergency news and you're rushing out of your home yelling "I'm taking my camera" to your spouse, yes you will use this exact sentence, but in a general sense it has a broader meaning. Actually, I'm even surprised wordreference doesn't even reflect that usage: http://www.wordreference.com/fren/appareil

Another use besides "device/machine/apparatus" is "airplane". Not sure Duo accepts "I take my plane" here, though. :D

October 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Carla472872

Ah, I just learned appareil as camera in Percy Jackson, and I thought I was doing well! :)

May 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/jhwjr
  • 23
  • 74

Larousse says "camera" is "appareil photo." Perhaps "appareil" by itself is colloquial or informal.

February 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/hannahsmith1215

That's how I learned it, but it still confuses me. :'(

January 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/YniPsn

It is quite common to us "appareil" for telephone in French. When ask who is on the other side of the phone, we say "Qui est à l'appareil ? " The response is usually " C'est xxx à l'appareil."

July 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Libellule808
  • 13
  • 13
  • 13
  • 8
  • 5
  • 367

That's appareil-photo (photo device). Not every device is a photo device (camera).

November 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/aussie3931
  • 25
  • 22
  • 8
  • 819

Because 'I take my device' is an unusual (but not unheard of) sentence in English, I wrote 'I take my equipment' which would be easily understood, but not accepted. The word 'device' conjures up a special purpose, unusual, clever, ingenious, problem-solving piece of equipment. I agree with SeanMeaneyPL on this page.

July 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Xenesis21
  • 12
  • 10
  • 8
  • 5
  • 3
  • 2

Could have been : I am taking my camera Appareil can also be translated as camera depending on the context.

March 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Macuk35

it is translated as both camera and device in another question on this topic - so why not here?

November 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/jytou
  • 18
  • 17
  • 14
  • 13
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 531

You could report it. See the very first discussion on top of this page...

November 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Carl_Ramrod
  • 25
  • 25
  • 23
  • 20
  • 14
  • 947

How about "gadget"?

January 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/aussie3931
  • 25
  • 22
  • 8
  • 819

Since I am still not allowed to take my equipment, I am taking my device today and the owl is happy.

January 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/betsys2003
  • 25
  • 24
  • 16
  • 12
  • 6
  • 6
  • 2
  • 232

What exactly does "device" mean here? I put instrument because that's always what appareil has seemed to mean to me - a piece of equipment that does a specific job. I guess that's a device, but that's not a word I would use in english. The only time I hear people say "device" they really mean "electronic device" like an iPad.

February 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/tRldfJ1n

surely camera is 'appareil de photo'?

February 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Amanda39912

"I take my device"?! What a dumb sentence

July 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/rooftopmoggy

Who ever uses the word device. My translation of phone was accepted earlier.

June 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/jytou
  • 18
  • 17
  • 14
  • 13
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 531

Not many people would use "device" for "phone" in English. But in French, « appareil » means both "device" (any kind of apparatus, it could be some electronic device to measure distances, temperature, a geiger counter, anything, really, but also very often for "photo camera") and "phone" (as a contraction of « appareil téléphonique », although it sounds a little old to me and we wouldn't use it for a smartphone, rather for a home phone, especially if it has wires, which few people have today in their homes). So when a French person says « appareil », it will take some context to know exactly what he's talking about. But in the end, translating it to "device" makes perfect sense.

June 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanMeaneyPL
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 20
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 47

But I have to agree with rooftopmoggy. In English (certainly in UK English) we would not say "I take my device".

We're far more likely to say "I'm taking/I'll take my equipment (formal)/kit/stuff/gear (informal)." Or we'd get specific and say "I'm taking my camera/phone/geiger counter/phaser."

Device is the sort of word you might (possibly) find in a science fiction film or a James Bond villain's lair, and even then, rarely.

June 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/johnnycopt

ah yes teach a harder word than necessary. could just say caméra! Mais non!

December 25, 2012
Learn French in just 5 minutes a day. For free.