Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"She is giving out."

Translation:Tá sí ag tabhairt amach.

3 years ago

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

What's she giving out?

She's givin' out yards!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AbbyGreener

Is this supposed to mean "she is wearing out" as we would think in (American) English... or more of an incomplete sentence like "She is giving out..." biscuits?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

The latter. It can also mean 'scold'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smrch
smrch
  • 17
  • 6
  • 3
  • 3

'Giving out' meaning 'scold' or 'complain'/'rant' is very common in Hiberno-English - 'she gave out to the children for breaking the window', 'he was giving out about the government'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AbbyGreener

Thanks for that note! I would never have guessed that for a million years!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Desiree29977

I guess that makes sense. In hiberno-english you give it out, in american english they're going to get it

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

You don't give "it" out, you just give out.

You can give out about someone/something (complain), or give out to someone (scold). "Giving out" without qualification means complaining.

"Tá sí ag tabhairt amach" would never be mistaken for an incomplete sentence.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/seanfw
seanfw
  • 18
  • 17
  • 15
  • 11
  • 8
  • 7

It's quite complicated to translate Hiberno-English "giving out" into general English. It can mean to scold or tell-off, but also complain or moan in some contexts.

Ah stop giving out will ye?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/liamh3

The meaning would be clearer if we had "biscuits" or "apples" at the end of the sentence.

2 years ago