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"Das Mädchen isst einen Apfel."

Translation:The girl eats an apple.

December 25, 2012

78 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vitor_S20

why is "einen Apfel" and not "ein Apfel"? in the text on "basics 1 page" says we have to use "ein" for masculine and neuter nouns and "eine" for feminine. doesn't talk in "einen"...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kyky

The apple is the accusative object of this sentence. That is why the article has to be accusative, too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vltesq

When you say, "accusative," do you mean that the word is referring to a specific object. I don't think we use the term "accusative." I think we call it a "direct object."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kyky

"Accusative" is the case. There are languages that do not have an accusative case but direct objects. Or think about "I help you." - "Ich helfe dir. (dative)" In what way is that more indirect than "I see you." - "Ich sehe dich. (accusative)"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kyky

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grammatical_case The thing is that it is in English "you". In German there is a difference. There is a guideline rule that says if the verb benefits the object, it is dative. This does not always apply however. In the case of help it fits. The person being helped benefits but if you "see" someone, there is no positive effect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kyky

Also in Finnish passive construction for example, the object is either in nominative or partitive case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vltesq

Thanks, but I still do not understand. When you say "case" what are you talking about. When we in English (American) say case, we mean whether it is a capital letter or lower "case." I don't see the difference between the two sentences "I help you" versus "I see you." Can you explain why they are not the same "case" dative or accusative? It would seem that they both should be accusative. And is dich or dir always used in your examples or can one say "ich helfe sie." Maybe I am thinking too much? :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/clares

Grammatical "case" is a concept in English too, and it's nothing to do with upper/lower case of letters. E.g. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grammatical_case

English doesn't have cases for most nouns, which makes it hard for us when learning other languages. We do have cases for pronouns though, so it can help to think of this. For instance I can't say "The cat sees I" or "Me sees the cat". Instead I have to say "I see the cat" and "The cat sees me". The pronoun I/me changes case depending on whether I am the subject or the object or the sentence. We/us is the same.

In german even "the" changes case so "the" in "the cat" in the sentences above would be different words. It also has gender (different words for "the" man and "the" woman) so German has something like 5 words for "the" where English just has one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/steelstringz

You're not thinking too much. German is hard for English speakers like us because we have to think about things like the accusative case. It's ok to mess up though, because you'll figure it out eventually. That's how you learn. Repetition and improving on failures.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dominic151431

Dont be retarded,you know what she meant wheb she said case.We americans use that word alot in courthouses lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EpicFaceIn

Everybody disliked that


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelloHello

"Accusative" refers to the case of the word. "Direct object" refers to the role that the word is playing in the sentence (linguists call it a theta role). Almost every word has both a case, and a theta role.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShaniaChur3

Accusative, neuter, dominative, masculine, feminine are cases for nouns and pronouns. Im still learning what they do and how the are used after 4 years of german. Den, dem, der, die, das


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ahogan86

You are right. We call it a direct object in American English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dominic151431

That doesnt make it right,you have to call it however they call it,dont use gramatical rules or terms of your own language when your trying to learn a new one,as they have their own language,in english you dont have a single word for you all,in german you do,thats an example,diferent languages.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dominic151431

What a retard,are u trying to learn english,or german???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShaniaChur3

Einen is the translation for an


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andjela68193

„Einen" is in the accusative, that's because you have to use accusative in this sentence


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/andrewarts291

ein=masculin eine=feminin einen= neuter they may be exceptions like: Das Mädchen


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ogbee

Km th f zum s m I'll im b RAF GB ml


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rosstux

What I heard at first was "The girl is an apple" I thought "That cant be right" Always remember the difference between ist and isst! haha!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chibicosmos

I know me too! It's like I thought "Das Kind isst ein Junge."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kyky

If it were "isst", then the thing being eaten would have to be in the accusative case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kyky

You have to capitalise all substantives in German.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Welcome45

and capitalize all Nouns in Deutsch! 德语里所有的名词首字母都要大写!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/krazysh_t

"the girl eats an apple" << should also be accepted as correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bigal2101

i agree its what i have been taught in my German class at school


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thhelin

the girl is an apple


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dominic151431

U meant isst,which is eats


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ericp2008

Ein Apfel ist ein Mädchen.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Poond

Whats the plural of Mädchen


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
Mod

    Singular: das Mädchen = "the girl"
    Plural: die Mädchen = "the girls"

    Look up any noun in any case on Canoo.net.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tatvano

    I would like to understand why we say DER Apfel ("the" masculine) and not EIN Apfle... Why do we use the neutral "a/an" form?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
    Mod

      Der/die/das/etc. = "the"
      This means a specific thing. The apple that is over there. That one, not any other.

      Ein/eine/etc. = "a/an/one"
      This means any one of the thing. It doesn't matter which of the apples, just bring me one of them.

      The first group that mean "the" are called definite articles. The second group that mean "a/an/one" are called indefinite articles. The articles are inflected (change their endings) to match the gender and case of the nouns that they refer to.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PauloPena1

      The more we learn, the more we understand the German thinking and the way of solving problems like they do. So, let the German language get in, don't become resistent ...


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tisrandi

      So it's only einen Apfel when it's the direct object? Meaning if it wasn't, it'd be ein Apfel? Like if the sentence was "The apple is red" it'd be "Ein Apfel ist rot"?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fiwey

      It always says that I keep on pronouncing "Apfel" wrong, even though I think it's right.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeborahEve7172

      What does "accusative" mean? and what does "nominative" mean? Danke!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

      You know how in English you say "I see him" and "He sees me"? You can't see "Me see he" or "Him sees I"?

      The words change to show their role in the sentence -- whether they're the doer or the thing that "undergoes" the doing (here: the seeing).

      "I" and "me" are two different case forms of the same word, as are "he" and "him".

      German has this as well, but it has four cases instead of just two as in English.

      The nominative case is used for subjects -- like "I" or "he". The person or thing that does the action.

      The accusative case is used for direct objects -- the person or thing that undergoes or "suffers" the action. (As well as in various other situations.)

      English has cases only in the pronouns, but in German, cases are much more alive and widely used, so you won't get around them.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Norwei-3rd-gen

      People need to explain it more like you. Seriously. Danke


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/seaberry

      I don't understand why I use das in front of girl because it says that you use das with neuter nouns. Girl is not neuter. Am I totally confused?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kyky

      "Mädchen" is neuter because of the diminutive ending "-chen". http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/M%C3%A4dchen


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/swiftysmith

      can we write a small 'm' and small 'a' in madchen and apfel resp.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Syriza

      All nouns are capitalized in German, just like all proper nouns are capitalized in English.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ghidush

      "The girl is having an apple."

      Should be a valid answer too. is having an apple - is eating an apple


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dominic151431

      Ofc it is..but y think out of the box??do u really say that you are having a pizza??but u could also say that you are having a baby.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rogers1942

      Lolz I thought she said 'the girl is an apple'


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrBennett89

      I put "The girl's eating an apple" and got marked wrong... will the app regognise contractions in a future update?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mattarchie

      Well, "girl's" is normally a possessive, rather than a contraction. Unfortunately, unlike "its" vs "it's", there isn't a difference in this case... I wonder if they'd have to do anything special to account for that. They'd probably only want to enable that from the courses for English speakers, because that could be really confusing for non-native speakers. Though, maybe not having it would be more confusing?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShinyEevee2000

      The girl eats a apple answer The girl eats an apple

      WHAT'S THE DIFFERANCE?! ugh- this is annoying........


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dominic151431

      The diferenc is that you had it wrong in english


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rooseveltnut2

      It has to do with pronunciation......the beginning sound of the following word. It makes sense when you see the explanation. https://www.englishclub.com/pronunciation/a-an.htm


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mahi.balanm

      'isst' means is eating, are eating or eats, right? how do i know whether the answer is 'The girl eats an apple' or ' the girl is eating an apple' ?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
      Mod

        Scroll down and read the tips on "No continuous aspect": https://www.duolingo.com/skill/de/Basics-1


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BradyOltme

        last time I checked "a" meant "1" as well.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jackjbaker

        Would "einen Apfel isst das Mädchen" still be acceptable due to accusative cases?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        That's an acceptable sentence, yes.

        (Though of course it's not an acceptable answer for a "type what you hear" exercise for the German sentence.)

        Your sentence emphasises the apple -- it's a bit like "it's an apple that the girl is eating".


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tyler194721

        don't " einen " and " ein " mean the same thing


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        Sort of. In the same way that "he" and "him" mean the same thing -- they both refer to a single male.

        But you can't mix them and say "Him gave me a book" or "I saw he last night".

        ein Apfel is the nominative case, which you would use e.g. when it is the subject of a verb, but here the apple is the object of the verb and so has to be in the accusative case.

        Apfel is masculine -- the only gender in which the accusative case looks different from the nominative in German. And in this case, it's einen Apfel in the accusative.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KennedyJon646583

        Why is it "isst" and not "esst"?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        Some verbs change the vowel in their stem in the du and er, sie, es forms, usually from e to i or ie or from a(u) to ä(u).

        essen happens to be one of them -- so it is du isst and er isst with an i rather than e.

        It's just something you have to learn -- for example, essen, fressen, messen form er isst, er frisst, er misst but pressen forms er presst. So you can't tell just by looking at a verb form whether it will do this vowel change or not.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ValentinSe14370

        How du you expect me to know, If you do not give the complete conjugation of the verb, singular and plural?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        The tips and notes for this unit, https://www.duolingo.com/skill/de/Accusative-Case/tips-and-notes , give the complete conjugation of a regular verb such as trinken, showing the regular endings.

        They also talk about vowel change in some verbs, say that this only happens in the du and er/sie/es forms, and give the example du isst, er isst below the table.

        This should be enough for you to derive the complete conjugation of the verb essen.

        The verb conjugation of essen in particular will also be shown later in the tips and notes for the unit "Animals 1": https://www.duolingo.com/skill/de/Animals-1/tips-and-notes

        Please always read the tips and notes before starting a new unit.

        On the website https://www.duolingo.com/ , they are available by clicking on the lightbulb icon after selecting a unit:

        They are not available (for most users) in the mobile apps for the German course.

        I wish they were, but for now, you will have to use the website to read them.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1silverfire1

        Stupid question, but i find that the use of the word 'isst' is something I am surprisingly struggling to understand. Is this form of, 'to eat' used for a specific gender(s) or maybe just specific nouns?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo
        • ich esse
        • du isst
        • er / sie / es isst
        • wir essen
        • ihr esst
        • sie essen

        So you use isst when the subject is du (you -- one person) or er (he) or sie (she) or es (it) or a singular noun (which could be replaced by "he", "she", or "it").

        For example, der Mann isst -- but not die Männer isst (the men is eating) because "the men" can't be replaced by "he/she/it"; "the men" is "they" and so it's die Männer essen (the men are eating) like sie essen (they are eating).


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Triforceof1

        Why is it "Das Mädchen isst einen Apfel" and not "Das Mädchen esst einen Apfel"?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        Why is it "Das Mädchen isst einen Apfel" and not "Das Mädchen esst einen Apfel"?

        Some verbs change the vowel of their stem, from e to i or ie, from a to ä, or from au to äu, in the du and the er, sie, es forms.

        essen is one of them:

        • ich esse
        • du isst
        • er, sie, es isst
        • wir essen
        • ihr esst
        • sie essen

        Whether a verb does this or not is something that simply has to be learned -- for example, geben has du gibst but leben has du lebst; kaufen has du kaufst but laufen has du läufst.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Triforceof1

        Thank you! Or should I say, danke!


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kimyblack

        why is it der Apfel and das Wasser

        ok Apfel is a feminine noun


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/susanstory

        "der Apfel" is masculine
        das Wasser is neuter


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arka5850

        why 'das' not 'die' as Mädchen is feminine right.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        No, it is not. The noun Mädchen is grammatically neuter, not feminine.

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