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"Quest'anno finisce il secolo."

Translation:This year the century ends.

5 years ago

36 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/OvidioLopez

Then we should party like it's 1999!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maddyis7
maddyis7
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1699...in an Amish Paradise.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maxim861877
Maxim861877
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The last year of the XX century was 2000, because there has never been the year 0: the first century started with year 1, and then each century has had 100 years.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bilboburgler

finishes is a little odd, perhaps "this year ends the century"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rossemilie

Awkward wording in English

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bipollack
bipollack
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or "The century ends this year"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GScottOliver
GScottOliver
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Yes! It appears to me that il secolo is the subject of the sentence, not quest'anno.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skenderz

Yes, and quest'anno would be an adverb as in When does this century end? ... This year.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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"This year ends the century" was accepted (May 2016).

In English, century can refer to any count, score, or other numerical achievement that relates to "one hundred". eg:
"This year sees the first century of our football club (founded in 1916)."
"Queen Elizabeth II will reach her century (one hundred years old) in 2026." (Long live the Queen!)
"Viv Richards scored many centuries in his cricketing career." (Do not be confused by the word "score" which, as a number, means "twenty").

If we want to specifically refer to the calendar period of one hundred years we capitalise, eg:
"This is the twenty-first Century".
"Christopher Columbus was a famous 15th Century explorer."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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I have now checked a few references. Whether or not we capitalise century/Century is only a matter of style. The current style it seems is now mainly accepted to be lower case "century".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hkysonjr
hkysonjr
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"This year finish the century\" is not correct. It should be "this year finishes the century."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tibiandtobi

Shouldn't "Questo anno" be also accepted? I was told that "questo anno" and "quest'anno" are the same, but due to the fact that "questo" ends with a vocal and "anno" starts with one, it's difficult to pronounce, thus it is abbreviated,but grammatically both should be correct. Is this wrong? Thanks!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rachelmknight1

Part of the grammar rule is that since "anno" starts with an a, it has to be "quest'anno," so grammatically "questo anno" would be incorrect, making that answer wrong in duolingo. Just like if someone asked you to hand them "a apple." That's grammatically incorrect since we have a grammatical rule to change "a" to "an" when dealing with vowels. Does that make sense?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/supu1
supu1
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They should be both accepted. I do not know the rule (if there is one) but i would for istance say "quest'anno ..." and "in questo anno ..."

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nihongoneko14
Nihongoneko14
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Can someone explain why it's "finisce il secolo."?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/acqualinda
acqualinda
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@nihongoneko14

When there is no object, there is often an inversion of subject and verb in Italian. Instead of subject/verb you can have verb (finisce) / subject (il secolo).

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marottaa
marottaa
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I put "This year concludes the century." I know it's a bit stiff, but it's semantically and grammatically accurate as well.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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If we prefer an alternative, we could use concludere or terminare which are closer to "conclude" than finir. And perhaps "completes" or the obvious "finishes" would suit us better. I'm sure there are many ways to convey a similar idea, but don't expect DL to include everything in their "acceptable list".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StephenCoates

I put "this year is the end of the century" so why is that wrong? One answer of DL is "this year ends the century" sounds like a non English speaker who does not know the correct word order (speaking as a mother tongue English speaker

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Maybe there is a regional difference, but "this year ends the century" would be OK here in the UK.

DL does sometimes give us idioms and other popular sayings where the translation has different words and construction but still conveys a similar meaning. This isn't one of them.
I suggest the translation here ought to at least reflect the vocabulary and grammar. There is no advantage in changing the verb finisce to a noun "the end". Your interpretation has a related meaning, but it is not an accurate translation. It isn't "wrong" per se, but I reckon it is just too far removed from the original for DL to include in their "acceptable list". Can you use different words that will read better for you without changing the structure?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Catia9
Catia9
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Does "Quest'anno il secolo finisce", mean the same thing as, "Quest'anno finisce il secolo"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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No.

In grammar terms:

"Quest'anno" [*] "il secolo" [subject] "finisce" [verb] --- in English "This year, the century ends".

"Quest'anno" [subject] "finisce" [verb] "il secolo" [object] --- in English "This year ends the century". (Actually, we might prefer to say "This year finishes the century" or "This year sees the end of the century".)

* I'm not sure what part of speech this is, but it acts as a time marker.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/frankmazuca

usefull phrase if i live to be 148

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Christophe696367

A once in a lifetime sentence (for most anyway)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/audrey233739

Come on I used the voice control thing and it said "and" instead of "ends". That's what I call poopy................ (or I mean WRONG!!!!!!!!!) Uhhhhhhhh.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dee_TJ
Dee_TJ
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This doesn't sound like natural English... You could say 'This year ends the century' in the UK, and it would be correct, but it sounds stiff and odd.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuliaTransue

Unless I live to be 94, I wil never have to use this...

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Noa562432

I don't think I will ever say it...

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cadal99
cadal99
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I'm sure I should remember/know this from earlier, but why "il secolo" and not "lo secolo".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alciebell

Lo is used for words starting with S+consonant.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cadal99
cadal99
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Thank you... languages sure are strange :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/a-muktar
a-muktar
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But it's not the case for z? Lo zucchero/zoo?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/omfg_no
omfg_no
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Anche for il z and also ps or pn or gn (lo gnocco)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/englishamo
englishamo
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This sentence will be useful once every 100 years!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Yes! Except "century" could also be used to refer to any period one hundred years long.
"It is 2113 and this year ends the first century of Duolingo", said Luis from his new language academy on Mars. :-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Martinosau
Martinosau
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I much prefer the new Italian lady!

3 years ago