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"Nosotros vamos a utilizar esta casa."

Translation:We are going to use this house.

September 25, 2013

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/faith46

The last few questions sound like a film production team conversation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nonyabeesw

Like the ladder falling or using the house for la set?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/faith46

I have a friend that is an art director and he is always looking for bizarre things for films, including houses that need to be demolished!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeanG6

'we are going to use this house' is accepted as correct. House is very much different from home. House is a physical, single family structure, as opposed to condo, apartment, triplex, etc. Home could be anywhere that you live and not necessarily a house.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/patlar

In English 'to utilize' and 'to use' has the exact same meaning - who is translating for Duolingo?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rmcgwn

Not in the database and they count on us to advise them. Did you know some answers have over 100 solutions?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sguthrie1

"use" is accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Villona

They are not exactly the same. Utilize implies a novel or practical use of something eg we will utilize this box as a desk.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sguthrie1

Yes, they are the same.

"Utilize" is a word people use because it sounds bureaucratic and important. They are "wordy", rather than simple and direct.

Examples of these "bureaucratic words" (aka jargon) and phrases include:

utilize, [use "use"]
be able to [omit]
commence [begin]
in accordance with [by, per, following]

implement [start, use, carry out]
multiple [many, various]
in the amount of [for]

Lawyers are especially bad at writing unclearly. The American Bar Association has endorsed the Plain Language movement: https://www.plainlanguage.gov/resources/content-types/legal-profession/

These have been called "inflated words".

However, good English writers prefer simpler words when they mean the same thing, as these two do.

See this university English writing center on clear, concise, direct writing. https://writing.wisc.edu/Handbook/CCS_inflated.html -- Avoid Inflated Words https://writing.wisc.edu/Handbook/CCS/ClearConciseSentences.html

The "Federal PLain Writing Guidelines" are the attempt by the government to improve the writing of pamphlets and other public information.

The word "utilize" is one of the "Dirty Dozen" words to avoid.

See this link: http://www.plainlanguage.gov/howto/wordsuggestions/simplewords.cfm

In summation, it is incumbent upon us to implement and commence to be able to ulilize simple language, in the event that we wish to promulgate clear writing and avoid obtuse, obfuscatory, and befuddling phrases and sentences.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisReill13

I feel tempted to add twenty words somewhere, that did nothing more than prolong the agony. Not many people seem to be on your wavelength, but i liked your post. I live in Spain and i can tell you they love their bureaucracy, they actually still use rubber stamps here. It is painful, but i am understanding why the Spanish language seems to be rather more complicated and convoluted than it needs to be, but hey viva la diferance ... Which might not actually be Spanish :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DarkVoice

...for the party.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ninahabla

"we are going to utilize this home" is wrong but "we will use this house" is right? I chose the first one because "we are going to" is a more literal translation than "we will"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LenoraFlood

Perhaps you were marked wrong for the use of 'home' instead of 'house'. I believe they are two distinct things.

home = hogar (abstract concept - as in 'this place feels like home')

house = casa (actual physical object - as in 'there is a giant hole in the roof of my house')

Of course, in English we often use the two interchangeably.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/d.deb

Very rare would this be said...maybe, we are going to use this house.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DemonicAngel1602

IT LOOKS SO DIRTY, THO!!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Angry_Mongoose

NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO I WAS SO CLOSE TO FINALLY NOT GETTING ANY WRONG ON A LESSON AND I DIDN'T SAY 'THIS'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrankEdger

This sentence is awkward as it stands. One expects an antecedent for "use/utilize" or a clause that explains what this house is going to be used for, i.e. 'base of operations, halfway house, to store __, as a school, church, etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Janet334410

Agreed. Most of the sentences where it is strictly translated as 'utilise' in English are sentences that, as an English speaker, I would hardly ever use.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jdb200433

yes, English translation "utilize" is unnatural. "use" would be natural and correct.

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