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  5. "Er hat eine Maus."

"Er hat eine Maus."

Translation:He has a mouse.

September 25, 2013

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gabika86

I can't make the difference between er and ihr. The pronunciation is the same

August 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShababbKar

Ihr is like "ear" and er is like "air"

February 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErdnaGoogle

Thanks

October 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vincentlmao.13

Ihr is like ee-ah, er is like eh-ah (try to say it fast and you will get my point)

March 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

It's actually not the same. But it takes practice to learn to hear the contrast

May 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fuumanchu

Is mouse alway feminine, although the animal is a male?

February 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JolaDzoku

Yes.

March 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kate_Joy

Is there a specific word for a female mouse, like tiger/tigress? I thought both sexes were called mice!

April 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

They are. However, there is a specific term for a specifically male mouse, which is der Mäuserich.

April 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kate_Joy

Thank you! Momentary thoughts of magnifying glasses if needed but, apart from science, I think 'spare their blushes' comes to mind. I remember the males are quite audacious and energetic. The girls, sadly, have endless litters.

April 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kikjezrous

When do you know when to use einen vs ein-eine for direct object articles?

September 25, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lieryan

In the accusative case, you use "einen" for masculine nouns, "eine" for feminine and plural nouns, and "ein" for neuter nouns. Note that, except in the masculine, they're all the same as in the nominative case.

In other words, the articles of direct objects (accusative) is the same as when the noun is in the subjects (nominative); except for masculine nouns, in which the article changes to "den/einen" when the noun is used as direct objects (accusative).

"Maus" is feminine so it uses "eine" here.

September 25, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kikjezrous

So it only changes form with the masculine? That makes sense. Thanks!

September 25, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WilliamPaul1

So, ein is usibed to describe masculine nouns, and eine is used to describe feminine nouns?

October 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mnmn77777

Yes

October 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/heatherose101

how does it very between; an and a

October 29, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chocol8mousse

Why is it "Ich habe EINEN Hund" but "Er hat EINE Maus"? Is it because Hund is der and Maus is die?

July 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andreas305

Exactly, and you have the accusative form as well.

"der Hund" / "ein Hund" is a male noun, the accusativ form is "den Hund" / "einen Hund".

"die Maus" / "eine Maus" is a female noun, the accusative form is "die Maus" / "eine Hund"

July 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

eine Maus

February 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lancynancy

How to say a male mouse??

May 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andreas305

male mouse = der Mäuserich

October 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Klaus601609

The audio sounds like its saying "da da und"

May 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jenell497852

Is he actually saying " Er hat" it sounds like "at" to me?

August 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iqueno1989

the audio sounded like Erd eine Maus. I have heard that a Texan speaking Spanish is almost unintelligible even when correct. This male German voice is like that, what is said is correct, but mostly unintelligible

August 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RayRabil

I can not tell the difference in pronouncement between Ihr and Er.

September 27, 2019
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