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  5. "You are drinking milk."

"You are drinking milk."

Translation:I drikker mælk.

May 19, 2015

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/koshachey

So is "Du" a direct "you" where "I" is more like a "y'all?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xneb

"Du" is singular "you" and "I" is plural "you", so yes, if that is what you meant


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Athalawulfaz

Du = thou, i = ye.

Same as German ihr, Dutch jij and Icelandic þér (from Old Norse ér, accidentally rebracketing the -ð from a verb ending, whence also Norwegian dere, though Swedish has ni for the same reason).

English began to use 'ye' as a more formal or polite version instead of the singular 'thou' in the 16th century. Eventually the object case 'you' replaced the subject case 'ye', which is like if you were to use 'me' instead of 'I'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mettens

It's kind of difficult to translate properly when there's no way to know if it's a singular "you" or a plural "you"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xneb

Both will be accepted unless there are grammatical reasons as to why one doesn't work. If there's a case where it doesn't accept the one you choose to use for that question, and it makes sense using it, then use the report button and we will add it when we see it. This question will accept both "I" and "du"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PH554

I answers "du" but I said it's wrong. So this hasn't been fixed. Quite frustrating when a direct translate would be "du"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jinger196577

There seems to be an error on this answer. I got it wrong twice, but answered "I drikker mælk" and then "Du drikker mælk". Both times were counted as incorrect. I reported it each time, but looks like this was a problem a year ago.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karen114692

It says to check ALL correct answers so you beed to pick both


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ramaskrik

Could somone explain to me the rationale behind the pronunciation of drikker?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

d, throaty r, i with tongue pulled back, soft and flat k, lazy e, and another throaty r.

Danish pronounciation is bad. For this, note that the r is spoken with the throat rather than the tongue which makes it sound much more vowelly (see also Dutch or German), and the plosives (p, t, k, b, d, g) are generally spoken rather softly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ramaskrik

Thank you!

One more question - why is i pronounced like e in drikker?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Could be more comfortable after pronouncing the r. But like in English there aren't solid rules and dialects can differ much. You can only listen and try to make sense of it yourself.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/immerweiter

is i really you? and not just i in english?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Yes, it is. °-°
The Danish I (always capitalised) is the plural you, du is singular you.
The Danish jeg is the word for "I" in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/immerweiter

thank you got it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Athalawulfaz

As above:

Du = thou, i = ye.

Same as German ihr, Dutch jij and Icelandic þér (from Old Norse ér, accidentally rebracketing the -ð from a verb ending, whence also Norwegian dere, though Swedish has ni for the same reason).

English began to use 'ye' as a more formal or polite version instead of the singular 'thou' in the 16th century. Eventually the object case 'you' replaced the subject case 'ye', which is like if you were to use 'me' instead of 'I'.

All of these come from a Proto-Germanic jīz, where in North and West Germanic they become jīʀ, whence English ye (no -ʀ suffix) and early Old Norse íʀ and éʀ, thus also Danish I.

The English pronoun I is from an earlier ich, like German but pronounced as 'itch'. The fact that Danish capitalises I is identical to the capitalisation of German polite pronoun Sie, but similarity to English is just coincidental.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lucy.Honeychurch

I would prefer it if I get told that something is wrong, not "You have a typo in your answer."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RashmiBhan4

When is "you" how can "i drikker maelk" be an answer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Rashmi, the Danish pronoun "I" is the plural "you" form, for when you're addressing multiple people. It's a bit confusing for English speakers, especially since the Danish "I" is also always written in uppercase.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SheenaBastet

So the danish I is the norsk dere ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Athalawulfaz

Yes. As above:

Du = thou, i = ye.

Same as German ihr, Dutch jij and Icelandic þér (from Old Norse ér, accidentally rebracketing the -ð from a verb ending, whence also Norwegian dere, though Swedish has ni for the same reason).

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