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"Estoy leyendo el editorial."

Translation:I am reading the editorial.

3 years ago

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/grafduckula
grafduckula
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Note to self: This does NOT begin with "I am legend".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arsha123
Arsha123
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Isn't "article" supposed to be accepted?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

The hint says leading article ( every article in a paper is not an editorial), and every hint will not apply to every sentence. Going with the obvious cognate is usually the safer, lower frustration bet. ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pelaaja_X

Why is "leading article" not accepted"??

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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In American English, a leading article is on the front page--the most important story of the day. An editorial is not on the front page, but the opinion of an editor or a columnist. Two different things.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Biblioglobal

Looking it up, it looks like "leading article" is a term that varies between British and American English. In British English, "leading article" does mean an editorial. Based on that, I'd say it should be accepted.

I'd always wondered why the editorials in The Economist were called "Leaders". Now I understand.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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You've educated me, you educated Economist reader. Gracias. (I adjusted my comment.)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pelaaja_X

Thank you! I got confused because of my native language (Finnish). Its equivalent for editorial is 'pääkirjoitus', which is literally translated "leading article", even if it's not its actual meaning. ;D

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joanmcdaniel

Is there a difference in meaning between "estoy leyendo" and "leo"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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It puts more emphasis on the fact that this is currently happening RIGHT AT THIS MOMENT. "estoy leyendo" "I am reading" right at this moment.

In English we use the progressive "I am reading" more than the progressive is used in Spanish, so that "leo" can mean "I read" or "I am reading". For example, in English we could say "I am reading at a 5th grade level." and it does not necessarily mean that I am reading at this moment, but that when I read that I then am reading at that level. In Spanish they would use the present tense for this and not their progressive. We could also use "I read at a 5th grade level.", but we like to use the progressive sometimes to show that this is our current level. Maybe it also has to do with the fact that "read looks the same in present and past tense". I don't know. We just do use the progressive any time it is not a habitual action. "I read every night." but "I am reading a great book." I tell my co-worker at work and you know I am not actually reading at work, but I am not finished with the book and so in my mind it is still going on.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Duomail
Duomail
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“I'm reading a great book“ can be said “Estoy leyendo un gran libro“ in a place where one is not doing it actually.
For “I'm reading at a 5th grade level“, I'm not sure about what it really means...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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Cool, which country is that for? Where are you from? Different countries use different numbers for the years in school. In the USA people start 1st grade at 6 years old, having finished preschool and kindergarten. At 7 years old, we are in 2nd grade and we work our way up to 12th grade which is our last year in high school after which we go to college or university. "I am reading at a 5th grade level." means that the books that I read are at the level that a 5th grade student could read. (10 year old children are usually in 5th grade.)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sparrowhawk28
sparrowhawk28
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Your explanation is much appreciated! I think schools in the UK have gone over to this system too, but for those of us of a certain vintage, referring to someone as '5th grade' or 'Year six' as they do here means absolutely nothing :-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/-LiamAnderson-
-LiamAnderson-
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DL is teaching me new words (in english). I had no idea what an editorial is!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LWSChristlover
LWSChristlover
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Editorial is a part of a newspaper. But personally, I like the comics better.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mike815908

The voice is saying este

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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It's not, but it is misplacing the stress, she is saying "éstoy".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jakeames1

Would soy work

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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No.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Esidereo
Esidereo
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that would be "I am the editoral" "yo soy la editorial"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amber405298

Why is the accent pronounced on the last 'a' of editorial if there's no accent mark above it?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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XSpanish has a two pronged stress rule. If the word ends in a vowel, an n or an s, the accent is on the penultimate (next to last) syllable. This includes words like consejo, examen, and even explains why plurals of words with accented last syllables lose the accent. Reunión becomes reuniones. Of this group n seems to have the most exceptions.

Words ending in all other consonants have their accent on the last syllable. So all unaccented words ending in l will have their accent on the last syllable. Consider normal, final, papel, nivel, etc. Obviously this is also true for words like estar, actividad, actriz and reloj. But actually there are several consonants which are never used at the end of most Spanish words, although you will find them on words borrowed from other languages. But that also means that they often will have accents.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amber405298

That makes so much sense! Thank you.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chubbchubbzza007
Chubbchubbzza007
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I know I've asked this question before, but I can't find the original comment, and no-one has replied to it lately. Does estar + gerund translate to in the middle of, ie would hago mean I do and I am doing, and estoy haciendo mean I am in the middle of doing?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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Yes That pretty sums it up English uses the progressive tenses much more often than Spanish. In fact it is essentially the default present tense for Action verbs as opposed to verbs of feelings, impressions and mental processes which do default to present. In Spanish the present progressive is used only to emphasize the ongoing nature of something. It is used for longer term projects (Estamos investigando eso) or to emphasize you are doing something right now

9 months ago