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"She was coming from the hotel."

Translation:Ella venía del hotel.

1
3 years ago

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/yurirojassalazar

Ella estaba viniendo del hotel .asi lo interpretaria yo pero me sigue demostrando el ingles que hay mas sorpresas jajaaj ta bueno pero me hace doler la cabeza.. saludos duo

4
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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Tu traduccion es valida Yuri :)

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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I'm not sure DL's use of the English continuous tense is best for translating the Spanish imperfect. The alternatives are normally fine, eg.: used to come / would come / came. But for me "was coming" places the emphasis primarily on the continuous nature of the verb as opposed to its past nature. I'm not saying it is incorrect, but instead that it can create a sense of "estaba viniendo."

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

The imperfect is supposed to point out the continuous or ongoing nature of something in the past. The estaba version would be used to point out that the process was occurring at a certain time. The imperfect is often used to set a scene for a something to happen: When she was coming from the hotel (imperfect) a shot rang out (preterit). The imperfect is very, very commonly translated as a continuous form.

5
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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Yep, sorry my comment wasn't clear. I was not suggesting the imperfect should not be used, but instead I was questioning the translation of the imperfect verb in this case into the continuous form in English. For me that is the last of the viable imperfect translations that springs to mind (unlike using the imperfect "estaba" to set the scene, then the gerundio "viniendo" to state the continuous nature of the action). Again, not saying it is incorrect, just questioning if the choice of "coming" in the English translation is the best, especially with the absence of an additional clause.

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
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veni'a is the imperfect tense. Therefore, I think equally valid translations are: She used to come from the hotel. (or) She came from the hotel.

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RussellRan1
RussellRan1
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Why not "Ella se venía del hotel"?

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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Good question. I'm not sure what differentiates "venirse" from "venir." Perhaps it is similar to the "ir"="go", "irse"="leave" distinction? Maybe "venir"="come" / "venirse"="act of coming"? But then, how would that function in the imperfect? Sorry, no answers, just more questions.

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yurirojassalazar

Gracias jellonz vuelvo a practicar esta seccion y me doy cuenta thanks.2016

0
Reply2 years ago