"Hva er det?"

Translation:What is it?

May 21, 2015

80 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PALewis88

I like this approach. Questions like this should be one of the first things people learn in any language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Julian8941

Impressive language bar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PALewis88

Haha thanks, I like to try out each language as it comes out but mostly focus on a few at a time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SpiralStat

I do the same. I'll focus on, say, French and Spanish for one day, and then Irish and Norwegian for another, and Esperanto and Polish for yet one more. I like mixing the hard and easy languages ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OmegaGmaster

I am completely unorganized. Send help


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oscar.Ferguson

thats a good strat


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jacob_sangi

I'm having trouble hearing the det. It seems to cut out. But anyway, tusen tack!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dr.Manhattan95

The pronunciation is more like deh so the t is silent.


[deactivated user]

    @marcin333 translating Thank you. ;p


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deadrin

    Probably because of the silent t :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lene409603

    Tack is Swedish, takk is Norwegian :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yibemajam

    Det is completely cut out, I can't hear it either.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ampus_Questor

    Looks like the 't' is silent, as is the 'h' in words beginning 'hv'. I'm new to Norwegian; using this basic stuff as a bit of a taster really. Must say I prefer my languages to be phonetic, especially in pronouncing consonants. German fits the bill but then the grammar is quite challenging. Still, can't have it all ways, I suppose.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sourick

    I had trouble understanding both "hva" and "det".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AgriziCan

    So i've always thought that dutch would look simmilar to norweigian. how wrong i was. But Dutch also beeing a Germanic language, i can see some similarities and i can see some words that look and mean the same. I find it fascinating and i can't wait to speak this language. Greetings from the Netherlands


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Haelgeweertjie

    I thought that Afrikaans, coming from Dutch, would look like Norwegian but nope :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AaronMolin2

    "Vo ara"? It's supposed to sound that way?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FanddenRidder

    I think it is something between "o" and "a" on "hvA". But definitely iis most like "a" than "o"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GofficPrague

    I can hear Vå arə. Am i correct?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oddn10

    /vɑː ꜛæˑɖə/


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trancydanc

    Does 'Det' mean 'it' or 'that'?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

    It's used for both.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NattKullav1

    Nynorsk - Kva er det?
    Bokmål - Hva er det?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/somuch13

    It's written Det, why we should pronounce it as ә


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FanddenRidder

    because the letter "r" from "er" its followed by letter "d" from "det". When "R" is followed by D,T,N,L,S it "ignore" the consonant, so the "det" become "et" in pronnounce. Another fact is that the "t" from "et" is silent, so the whole word "det" become a simply "eh" in pronnounce. "Er" + "eh" = "er'eh"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mabynke

    You must remember that the d does not become silent when you have r + d. Rather, the d is «colored» by the r, and both are replaced by a voiced retroflex stop. Similar cases are r+s, r+t and r+l. The sound example in this case is (for some reason) actually using a retroflex flap, which is used only in certain dialects in certain cases of r+d.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FanddenRidder

    do you know a video that explain about consonants retroflex and all these things?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mabynke

    I'm sorry, I have never looked for videos explaining Norwegian pronunciation. If you're looking for videos, it might help to know that Swedish uses a retroflex T, D and S after R, just like Norwegian. Hindi also has retroflex sounds, and probably many others, too.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mabynke

    This video seems to be relevant (the person in it is saying the words with the Oslo-dialect). By the way, keep in mind that you will be understood completely fine without using retroflexes (and pronounce the R separately instead). We are used to hearing people with foreign accents. :) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TRegrgHDLq4


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FanddenRidder

    no no. I mean if you know about these kind of things in learning a new language. I dont know what is "retroflex", where can I find it?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Craig842379

    For now, I think I'll remember this using the (almost) English word DENTALS. Thanks FanddenRidder.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nunes89

    Let me know if I got it right.

    -r + d- = [ɾ] ? (a tap, like in Swedish)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SupEvan

    Actually it's ɖ (Voiced retroflex stop). R + t/d/n/s/l create retroflex consonants.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EvanMcKee1

    Whoa! Nice language bar, man.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/izydor

    Bbar where you can see languages that he learnt, which SupEvan's quite impressive :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mabynke

    SupEvan is right (for almost all rolling R-dialects). But as a funfact: Some Norwegians actually use the ɾ in the words det, du, deg, de, dem after a vowel or an r. So «Hva er det» really could be pronounced /vɑː'æːɾə/. You should not really think too much about this unless you are a pronunciation geek, though.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FanddenRidder

    what this "ə" mean?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MuhammadAr189213

    A schwa. The sound made by the letter 'a' in 'about'.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DoctorWho01

    Schva is frequently used in the Russian and the English languages, though. I say it as a Russian native speaker who is learning English.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SomeDuckInASuit

    Can someone please help me with the pronunciation of the letter 'R'? Is it supposed to be rolled or what? Please keep your reply simple because I'm only a beginner to language learning (As you can probably see in my language bar haha).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mabynke

    The very simple answer is: yes, it is usually supposed to be rolled, and any Norwegian would understand you if you roll the «r» every time! ;)

    The less simple answer is that it is often not rolled, for instance when it is in front of a «d» or «t», in which case the two sounds «melt» together and make a new sound, like here (although I would say that the Duolingo voice is a bit off).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FanddenRidder

    what you mean with "roll the r"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mabynke

    To pronounce the «R» distinctly (as an «alveolar trill» or «alveolar flap») instead of having it «melt in» with another letter (and as opposed to «guttural r», wich is also common in Norway).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kawaiineko177

    Anyone learning Japanese


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cri.22

    I have always troubles discerning "har" and "er".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dr.Manhattan95

    Can someone clarify the pronunciation of Hva? When I hover over the individual word, it sounds like vah but when I play the sentence, it sounds like voh.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidRussell323

    a short "vah" is how I was taught to say it! You may be hearing "voh" because of the following "er", lazy pronunciation changes to "vaherdeh"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NnekaJanel

    Tusen takk is it thank you so much or thank you ver much?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

    It would be a good translation of meaning for both of them. The literal translation is "thousand thanks".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SyedRizwan2

    I can pronunce it exactly the same way because that "R" sound is also present in my mother tongue Sindhi


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emil.O.V.132

    haha this very oslo pronociation. In the west we say: "hva e de"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaihn

    Should't be: What is this?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

    That would be "Hva er dette".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ryan88007

    How do you say zugzug in Norwegian?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CassidyP.

    Is ther an easy way to tell bewteen dere and det?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kiredec

    Again, what about "what is this?"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/henrydwatson

    The meaning of 'this' and 'it' are slightly different both in English and in the Scandinavian languages. 'What is this' would be 'Hva er dette'.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/millermj

    So just to clarify, one rolls the "r" in "er" when the word comes before a vowel, and leaves it hard before a consonant?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mabynke

    I am not quite sure what you mean by «hard», but the R assimilates with the following consonant if it is a T, D, N, L or S. The resulting consonant is a retroflex. In front of most other consonants, it has a tendency to be silent. (This does not apply for all dialects)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JudithBC6

    If "it" is det, then how do you translate "That"? In case we have it in the same sentence: what is that?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mabynke

    «that» is translated to «det» or «den», depending on the gender of the thing referenced. And although «What is that?» and «What is it?» can both be expressed as «Hva er det?», the former would (usually) be pronounced with a stressed «det», whereas the latter would not.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Miruna.Andreea

    In "det" you don't pronounce the "d"? I can't hear it ...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FVmike

    because of the r in er coming right before the d in det, apparently the two sounds are elided together in a retroflex tap. underside of the tip of your tongue taps the ridge behind your teeth.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnaBeatx

    Why its so different the det in a sentence and when i heard just "det"? Help meee I cannnn't


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joelnaqqar

    Det is pronounced déa, according to older lessons. Here however, it was more like: Va ar'a, instead of Va ar déa. Why?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jelo-E

    what is that hva er det being like hav er'a?? but in the same time det spelling like détt ?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZZtopstran

    What happened with "det" ? It sounds as if "what is it" just turned to "What". "det" was not pronounced at all.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OlgaKuznetsova_

    I cant hear "er det" here it is pronounced like "are"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/agnetre

    Guys!! I find it difficult to understand the difference in pronounciation between "har" and "er". Help!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Iamtireeeed

    Why not "what is that"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SofieChane

    so in one question in norwegian it says hva er det and the answer is what is it but it can also mean what is that

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