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  5. "Tá an ceapaire roimhe."

" an ceapaire roimhe."

Translation:The sandwich is in front of him.

May 21, 2015

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnClayborn

Like, sitting on a plate in front of him before him, or like standing in line and the sandwich is first? Previous lessons suggested that riomh was related to time (ie: i eat before the boy)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

It can be both and relate to time. It can't be a conjunction though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnClayborn

Go raibh maith agat!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LizKerrey

I put 'the sandwich is before him', meaning in front of him, but it's marked wrong, isn't that a bit pedantic?? We do say 'we place a meal before someone'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mmelosh

Accepted 13.06.2020


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RayMonaghan

Couldn't this also mean "the sandwich is in front of it"?

I tested it out and it was marked incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JudyMarieS1

I put the correct answer in and it says I am wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LukeProcto6

I reported "he has a sandwich before him". Do not see how this is wrong (even if slightly poetical)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

Aside from the fact that the subject of the sentence is an ceapaire ("the sandwich", not "a sandwich"), the verb is , and dosn't mean "has".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mikeinkerry

I take this to mean approximately, "He's got a sandwich."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

roimh doesn't indicate possession - you might make a case for "he's got a sandwich in front of him", but just as "there's a hole in the ground in front of him" doesn't imply that he owns the hole in the ground, "there is a sandwich in front of him" doesn't imply that the sandwich is in his possession (though in most cases if someone puts food in front of you, there is an implied permission to eat it).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zookyjim

There is a sandwich in front of him surely is also correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

an ceapaire means "the sandwich".

Tá an ceapaire roimhe - "The sandwich is in front of him"
Tá ceapaire roimhe - "There is a sandwich in front of him"
(you could say "A sandwich is in front of him", but "There is a sandwich in front of him" is how English normally expresses this).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/seanlee84

I don't see how this sentence is talking about "him" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

roimhe is a "prepositional pronoun", a combination of the preposition roimh and the pronoun é.

romham - "before me"/"in front of me"
romhat - "before you"/"in front of you"
roimhe - "before him"/"in front of him"
roimpi - "before her"/"in front of her"
romhainn - "before us"/"in front of us"
romhaibh - "before you (plural)"/"in front of you (plural)"
rompu - "before them"/"in front of them"

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