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https://www.duolingo.com/m4r1u5z

Choosing between el/la during translation the image

Dont you think is a little bit uncomfortable solution? We are able to do whole excercices without using the mouse but not this one. Maybe the good solution will be like the one with choosing the right translation (using 1/2/3 in keyboard)? What do you think about that?

4 years ago

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Salxandra
Salxandra
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I think that if you just start typing "el" or "la" you will find that you can input it without using the mouse.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/m4r1u5z

eh, i never tried to do this but its really works so i think this is the end ot this thread tenga un dia bueno

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samsta
Samsta
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You kinda had it right using the subjunctive, but what they would usually say is "Que tengas un buen día." It means something like "I hope you have a good day" or "Have a good day." Remember that "Día bueno" is the same as "buen día".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/m4r1u5z

yes i know about already whole sentence about dia bueno / buen dia. is it the same like in 'gran / grande'? am i correct? gran dia, dia grande?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samsta
Samsta
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Yep! Also remember that if you want to call something good, and it's feminine, it stays the same, and doesn't lose the ending. Here's what I mean: Good girl = Chica buena = Buena chica. There are many more words like this.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/m4r1u5z

so with masculine its like buen chico, right? thanks very much. i try to catch every thing like this to improve my spanish, que tengas un buen dia, eres buen amigo ;p

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/m4r1u5z

i think this tree is too long ;p un thing is because of my lack in english, not spanish, but thanks anyway ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samsta
Samsta
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Yes, "buen chico" is correct. And you're very welcome.

btw: "eres un buen amigo"

It wouldn't let me reply to your comment so I posted it here.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Salxandra
Salxandra
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Lol I was going to correct your Spanish until I figured out it was subjunctive. Gracias por enseñarme algo

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/m4r1u5z

gracias also, coz i made a mistake, it had to be 'tienes un dia bueno' ;p but now i see i write correctly probably, to wish anything to anybody i should use subjuncative insted of indicative, am i correct?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Salxandra
Salxandra
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I haven't covered subjunctive yet, but I think you got it right. Here's one reference. http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=14724

From what I'm reading, the full phrase is "que tenga un buen dia" or "que tengas un buen dia" for familiar you. And, it looks like you can just shorten it to "Tenga un buen dia."

They are saying that if you put it in the imperative like it's done in English that that would be rude because you would be commanding someone to have a good day. "Ten un buen dia."

This was a nice intro into subjunctive and how it's used for uncertain, unpredictable things.

This phrase should probably have been in the Phrases lesson. But... people would have had a hiss fit with the subjunctive. Maybe, Duolingo introduces it way at the bottom of the tree in the subjunctive lesson.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/m4r1u5z

so you confirmed what i already know about subjunactive. about my shorter phrase. i thought if in english is 'have a nice day' in spanish would be the same, so i put spanish words in correct order and made my 'tenga un dia bueno' ;p and by a mistake i used correct form of 'tener' word ;) so now we are both a little bit smarter

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CattleRustler

I'm thinking he either should have said buenos dias, or buenas tardes.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/m4r1u5z

it means 'good morning' / 'good afternoon' as a welcome phrase

4 years ago