"Демійчоловік?"

Translation:Where is my husband?

3 years ago

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/unPlatypus

Hahaha, "Cholovik" means "Human" in Polish :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vinnfred
Vinnfred
  • 16
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 2

In Ukrainian чоловік is both husband and man and can also be used to mean people (as plural of human) in indirect cases: Я зустрів п’ять чоловік - I have met 5 people :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RaymondLee10

I think in German "der Mann" can also mean "the husband" or "the man".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kreilyn
Kreilyn
  • 25
  • 20
  • 14
  • 13
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3

Don't think it, ensure it man!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanaMootII
DanaMootII
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 21
  • 14
  • 12
  • 12
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 59

wo ist mein Mann = where is my husband, auf deutsch

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
  • 20
  • 17
  • 16
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2

That's correct -- at least in a possessive context, e.g. mein Mann = "my husband", but der Mann would be understand only as "the man".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Augustine19726

How to say - i have five husbands

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vinnfred
Vinnfred
  • 16
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 2

Я маю п’ять чоловіків

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spicy_wolf

that would be actually a Russism. In Ukrainian it's better to say "Ya zustriv pyat' liudey/Я зустрів п'ять людей".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shadowofthemoon
shadowofthemoon
  • 23
  • 19
  • 19
  • 16
  • 15
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1611

Ma femme in French. Meine Frau / Mein Mann in German, etc, etc.. The same idea in many other languages - it can be either husband/wife or man/woman depending on the context.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/leearcher
leearcher
  • 25
  • 13
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2

Same in Russian. I put "Where is my human" at first but it just seemed too creepy.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sagitta145
sagitta145
Mod
  • 18
  • 13
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7

Hmm, if it's plural then "чоловік" can mean "человек" (human) as Vinnfred said, but for singular "человек" you have to use "людина".

"Чоловік" means "husband" and "a man" not as in "a human" but rather as in "a male"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JewishPolyglot
JewishPolyglot
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2

Dude! I knew человек also, that's why I put in "where is my man" :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/whales_in_veins

I thought the same way and it reminded me books about cats from my childhood :).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CameronHenri

Chovek means man in Croatian

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joseph2
Joseph2
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 24
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 8
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2

Let's not forget that even in English the word "man" can mean many different things depending on context. The opposite of "woman", i.e. an adult male. It can also mean humanity or people in general ("mankind" or "man's best friend", for example); plus, husband and even significant other/boyfriend. Granted, the husband/boyfriend usage may be more informal in English than it seems to be in many other languages. And the "humankind"-type meanings seem to be falling out of use because they are now perceived to be "sexist" by some. Nevertheless, none of these forms of the word sound at all unusual in our day-to-day speech either.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/littleblueduck
littleblueduck
  • 16
  • 14
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 2

I may have gotten you wrong, but in Ukrainian "чоловік" (singular) only means "adult male" or "husband". A human is "людина" (plural "люди"), and mankind is "людство".

Fun fact: "людина" ("human", "person") is a female noun in Ukrainian.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TJabraao
TJabraao
  • 24
  • 18
  • 18
  • 17
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 2

Some sentences (like this) don't show the audio button to me. Should I report this as an error, or it just doesn't have audio (or is being implemented)?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vinnfred
Vinnfred
  • 16
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 2

I think you just have to wait a little bit. This problem is already known to the team and they are working on fixing that

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Skoha0
Skoha0
  • 14
  • 9
  • 9
  • 7
  • 7
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 2

Is this more common than муж?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vinnfred
Vinnfred
  • 16
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 2

Муж is an archaism

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spicy_wolf

I'd say muzh doesn't exist in Ukrainian at all, even as an archaism. Only if you go really deep to the Kyevan Rus age and even further, when Slavic languages didn't separate yet. It does exist in Russian as an archaism, though.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarcinLoto

It's kinda weird to me. A word mąż exist still in Polish. For me using the same word for human and husband seems too awkward...

6 months ago
Learn Ukrainian in just 5 minutes a day. For free.