"Hvem er det?"

Translation:Who is it?

May 22, 2015

54 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hellwyr

I hear something like "hvem ar'eh", does the "det" really disappear like that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SupEvan

Norwegian uses consonant mutations in any case where the letter "r" is combined with an alveolar/dental consonant. Doesn't even have to be in the same word. The r + d in "er det?" turns into a voiced retroflex stop. Look it up on wikipedia to hear the sound file.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MultiLinguAlex

"Look it up on wikipedia to hear the sound file." - Link?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrew1971

Fantastic! Thanks for that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DarioPl26

SupEvan I've noticed that this sound is produced for example when a "du" follows an "er". So it is very different to pronounce "du" alone (a normal d sound) than "er du" in a sentence!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LuizzViniciuss

That's complicated guy :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SupEvan

You'll get used to it, and the sounds are fun to pronounce :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/seanrosk

You don't have to do it like that. Not everyone in Norway does that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SupEvan

He's right, there isn't actually any standard pronunciation of Norwegian (But for some reason we have two standard written forms). Since it is built up on dialects, you don't have to use consonant mutation, because some dialects don't. However, the dialect known as East Norwegian (which accompasses several different dialects and sociolect) is generally seen as what could be considered standard Norwegian, and that dialect uses consonant mutation so I would advise you to learn it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/a-muktar

Voiced retroflex stop? Basically the "d" in "doctor"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SupEvan

Nah, that isn't retroflex. Maybe in an indian accent.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FanddenRidder

what u mean with "alveolar/dental consonant?" And what is "voiced retroflex stop?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SupEvan

Look up International Phonetic Alphabet on Wikipedia. They're basically names for different sounds.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kristo004

The eastern accent (which is the most similar to Norwegian Bokmål) often turns the D into an R. I would reccomend pronouncing the D properly though, at least until you learn to speak more fluently.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Menelion

And what about tones? Does Norwegian have tones like Swedish?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VikingRif

The word "DET" is pronounced always like "DE", right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Si1vanu5

yes, 't' is silent, so 'deh' -- https://www.duolingo.com/skill/nb/basics under "special notes on common words" at the bottom of page, seems like it should be on top, but it's there :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kumatangz

Is Hvem pronounced with the H slient and just the "Vem" being spoken.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Si1vanu5

Yes, under "basics" "pronunciation" It is stated that h in front of v is silent.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_Tawera_

I always read it like ˈˈkvɛmˈˈ because h turns to k in Icelandic. Also the "er det" I pronouced like this: ˈˈɛɾ̥ dɛːˈˈ


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PakPolyGlot

That "ar'eh" sound is also present in my mother tongue Sindhi which is also an Indo European language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kiredec

How about "who is this?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ullebad

That would be "hvem er dette". "This" is "dette" for neuter nouns and "denne" for masculine nouns.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/simimonimon

Is it a friend of mine?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PD711

Is this what someone might say if someone was knocking on their door?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/seanrosk

Yes. Or if someone calls you from an unknown phone number.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guitariffic

Can "det" be "that" and "it" aswell?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Regney
  • 2267

It certainly can. :0)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Haru_lis

In the normal sound /dea/ nor sound is only "hvem er"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JakeyRan

I am confused about the pronunciation of "er." esp the "r" sound. Help please.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jonta

«Ær» - «Æ» as in a sound you might make in fear ("Aaaaahhh, a snake!"), not very different from the German "ä", and a rolling «r».


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmilyOlmed

I'm confused, when you say det, do you make the t sound?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/King2E4

No, it is silent in "det", so it is pronounced like "deh".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tieeemen

So for 'it', when do you use 'det' or 'den'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

"Det" for unknown or neuter gender, "den" for masculine or feminine gender.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidMiles7

knock knock
who is it? well done well done who? well done dulingo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/datenreisender

“Whom is it” is a wrong translation!? What would that be in Norwegian?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Regney
  • 2267

Whom is used to refer to the object of a verb or preposition. If you can replace it with he/she/they, use who. If you can replace it with him/her/them, use whom.

In Norwegian, hvem is used for both who and whom.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BryUB1

Do you know some YT videos ´bout Norwegian?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ICaune

Can you say "who is it?" ? Who - for living beings, it- for objects. I thought it was either "who is he?" or "what is it?". I'm a non native English speaker learning Norwegian


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

Imagine a situation where someone unknown is knocking on your door. You still don't know who they are, much less their gender, so you default to "it".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MariaLuiza342278

Can we say " Hvem er du?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

That would mean "Who are you?".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/harmaajoki

hek I failed twice lol

Learn Norwegian (Bokmål) in just 5 minutes a day. For free.