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  5. "Ella llevó la pluma al hotel…

"Ella llevó la pluma al hotel."

Translation:She took the feather to the hotel.

September 26, 2013

124 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mreaderclt

I think "la pluma" here means "pen." ... Maybe she travels a lot and just for kicks, leaves pens inside hotel rooms from rival chains. For instance, wouldn't it be fun to leave a Super 8 pen inside the desk at the Ritz Carlton?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dunk999

No, the speaker is talking about an old Sierra-style adventure game where you had to take the feather to the hotel in order to get the troll to give you the pot of gold.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ranchers1

From what I understand "la pluma" is an old school pen (made of a feather). They don't use those much anymore. This I'm thinking must have truly meant a real feather. I'm new but I saw this in a different DL link.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MystyrNile

That, and one of those snazzy caligrapher's pens. Bolígrafo is the usual term for an ordinary pen though, i think.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Talca

bolígrafo = ball-point pen


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elissaf1

Bolígrafo suggests a ballpoint pen. Pluma would be a fountain pen, which rarely have feathers and have an internalised ink source in modern times. Bolígrafo can be shortened to "bolí".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArrigoDelaRoca

Muchas gracias


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeoGirard

I've heard "lapicero" also. I checked it and it can mean anything from pencil, mechanical pencil, pen, ballpoint, fountain pen, and can even be a "grosería"!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MyaCronk

That makes more sense than her just carrying a feather around


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mattrivers

That would be called a quill! Shakespeare style.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sahugaurav

You mean she's a wizard? :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/c.Suaz

It's one of those regional things, in most parts of Mexico boligrafo it's not used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TawnyMilla

What do they say in Mexico?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/c.Suaz

Pluma for ball-point pen. Pluma fuente for fountain pen. But you can say bolígrafo and everyone will understand you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArrigoDelaRoca

Muchas gracias


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertTudo2

The english for such a pen would be 'quill'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Beto330368

Using a quill (pluma) and a fountain pen (pluma fuente) was the way we learned our penmanship. Our desks included an inkwell for that very purpose.

Calligraphy was more than an art form, it was the way to achieve good marks, no matter the subject.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dansmisterdans

Y el nombre del hotel fue Los Flamencos Rosados


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MJMGruver

It accepted "she took the pen to the hotel".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Catvz68

While in Spain, a Spanish shopkeeper got really worked up because we said "pluma" instead of "boligrafo" (no es una pluma, es un boligrafo!) which makes me think that in general usage, pluma is old-fashioned like English quill, and isn't really used. I could be wrong though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Beto330368

Pluma = ink/fountain pen

Bolígrafo = Ballpoint pen


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Orelion

Hahaha. That reminds me. I once found a sticker on a wal-mart cart with print: I've been krogering.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Noe326903

That is the definition of reading too far into something. But, I like it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/richard.mo20

Agreed , it means pen. I read the meaning as: she took the pen at the hotel (from the hotel room)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/efaryna

If you want to say that you would use "de" instead of "a". "Del hotel" means "from the hotel."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paulcommadennis

I tried that one, and they marked it as being incorrect. I thought it was the only way that made sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eloise23

Lo quiero mucho!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JesseCrozier

Thats hilarious!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elizadeux

It can be either.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Iminvic

My answer was she "wore" the feather to the hotel instead of she "took" the feather to the hotel, which was scored as incorrect. According to the definition, llevó (llevar) could mean either. It seems to me that in this context, either should be correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mojave4177

Yes, She wore the feather in her hat. Red Hat Club you know.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JGarrick62

That would make more sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeanG6

I tried that as well -- 'she wore the feather to the hotel' -- and it was marked wrong (Dec 2014). I knew it was a risk but I couldn't resist. It just seems the best translation! (I will report it.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carianne.

I wondered this as well. Will someone please clarify?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Saballama

It is correct, but Duolingo did not think of it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Beto330368

Lleva puesto = wear


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Susan799085

That is what I thought, but I recently ran across an exercise which just used the verb llevar without the puesto part. Hmmm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marliner

What is the "desired" answer here?

It should be translatable as "she wore the feather" but that is not accepted. If the authors want users to select a particular interpretation, they should provide context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kazmax1

I couldn't agree more! I put "She wore the feather...", also, as it seemed the least bizarre translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sanyo_neezy

Definitely an underrated comment!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bbedford59

It must have been a very special feather, indeed, for her to want to take it to the hotel. maybe it tickled her fancy.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CrypticOne

A fan dancer! Yeah--I was thinking maybe she's doing some 'bizness' at that hotel.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/panjialang

Worst sentence ever.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pigslew

There are dozens and dozens either as bad or worse!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/L8rgator

Yeah im pretty sure "He doesn't arrive the roof" was the worst so far for me :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marianne.w4

I wrote : She took the pen at the hotel. Why AT is wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SaJoHo

As i understand it, "Llevar" is more like "to carry"--when you bring items or wear clothes that travel with you because they are on you.

"At the hotel" usually refers to location so you use "en el hotel".

For comparison, there are two ways to write "I threw water balloons at the hotel." 1. You could throw water balloons at the hotel because you don't like their service. This "at the hotel" describes direction/trajectory so you use "al hotel". 2. But if you're "at the hotel" in a suite throwing water balloons at a friend, you would use "en el hotel".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lyanracoste

I am wondering the same thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eualb

At the hotel=en el hotel

" To" es la preposición de movimiento o dirección más común.

Significado: a, hacia, dirección a (siempre indica movimiento)

Uso: Se utiliza "to " para mostrar movimiento en una dirección específica

http://www.curso-ingles.com/gramatica-inglesa/preposic_direccion.php


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BoulderSpanish

I think it is "She wore the feather to the hotel."Why is it marked incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MattEcuador

In Ecuador it's usually 'una pluma' for a pen when it's an informal setting and 'un esfero' for a pen in a formal setting. 'Bolígrafo' isn't used here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StanleyTho6

I disagree that silly sentences should be eliminated. I think one of the strengths of DL is forcing you to translate something you've never seen before, even if it sounds silly. Otherwise your translations will just be repeating something you saw before by rote, which is the weakness of many traditional language instruction systems.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vsaturday

Exactly! It would bd like choosing the most obvious answer. This way, it forces us to translate the sentence that is there, not what is expected.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/The.Other.Caleb

I completely agree with you. Plus the silly sentences are fun!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

I understood it was a feather, by example on a hat, and she was wearing the feather, why it's not correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AashaySC

She took the feather with her. She ordered all expensive dishes. At the end of the meal she put the feather in the food. She complained about it to the manager and blamed the hotel staff for the feather in her food. She was not asked for the bill


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kinarich

Seriously, the more logical phrase would have been, "i took the pen FROM the hotel"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ridnarhtim

I had to listen to it five times because I was sure that I was mishearing...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iannoone41

Now, there's a sentence we can use on our vacation! :D It was translated "feather" the other way around!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/espeekespanish

Yo, to all of you wondering about this sentence.... It's a grown-up thing, don't worry about it ;) (i assure you, its legit)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hillymia

Maybe she just enjoys a little tickle from a feather before bed!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JordanJohn84053

Oh, cool, a feather! Maybe Best Western would like one of these?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rebotica

why not "wore"?. She was going to a fancy dress party at the hotel!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/venetoblu

Perhaps there was a dress code and more than one feather was required!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jimmy232Neiman

sometimes the bazar statements make it hard to translate. why not, "maleta o equipaje" something that makes sense. her dinner


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sallyann_54

Don´t know about Stop the clutter! If nobody´s listening, we have to repeatedly ask - why is ´She wore....` not accepted? And why do I find no translation on this page?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kazmax1

We have to repeatedly REPORT it until DL decides to allow it. Did you?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LindaHill

"Inn" also means "hotel."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bryn1953

How can we differentiate between llevo as wore, carried or took away here, I put " she wore a feather to the hotel""....apparently wrong why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chaterlaine

Sorry to keep saying years ago when I studied Spanish but I did study it years ago and then the la pluma was a pen. It was probably the first sentence I learned in French, too, and the only one I remember: La plume de ma tante est sur la table. Boligrafo sounds like a very old fashioned word to me, but I am probably thinking of Rapidograph.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Beto330368

Bolígrafo has its origin from two Greek words μπάλα (bála) γράφω (gráfo̱) literally ball write, ie Ballpoint Pen


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sponner

could this also be " she brought the pen to the hotel" as llevar = to bring?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SusannaEDavis420

Ah, I typed, "she wore the feather to the hotel" and it was counted wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Margaret_Kirk

They gave one definition of "llevo" as "wore" so why did they not accept = she wore the feather to the hotel?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuevesHuevos

The hints are not tailored for the context of each question. Sometimes, "to wear" is a translation for "llevar" (I've only heard it used with "llevar puesto"). It's up to you to figure out the correct context/translation based on the information given.

Think of the hints as just a general dictionary that lists many possible translations for that word.

Or better yet, just keep a dictionary with you/use WordReference/SpanishDict to translate instead of relying on the hints.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fabs.

Translated "She brought the pen to the hotel" and that was accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gustavo6155

I'll use this line as a conversation-starter from now on!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scarolan108

...where her client was eager to be tickled


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gz7g6b

Taking a feather to a hotel is a non event in the US. Does it have meaning in latin cultures?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mdecoster

Then how would one say "She took the pen at the hotel."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vsaturday

Ella llevó la pluma en el hotel.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharlesBel17

and what exactly did she do with 'the feather'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarolGlove

Hmmm ... I wonder what she does with the feather at the hotel?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yvonne381344

La pluma is definitely pen, not feather. Duolingo please correct this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IanBurgess1

Neither us could get Duolingo to accept our pronunciation of this - wish it gave more indication of what you are saying wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KenMammel

The Spanish translated to this English sentence: She took the feather to the hotel. When's the last time someone said that in English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HugoLeMoyne

I answered "She brought the pen at the hotel" and had a mistake. I though to the hotel or at the hotel were equivalent. Am I mistaken?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/beeohdee

Why is "She wore the feather to the hotel", wrong? Might that be 'llevaba?' Kind of surprised that no one else answered that way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sahran_

Who takes a feather to a hotel? Sometimes it seems Duolingo developers don't know English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/The.Other.Caleb

See Stanley Thompson's comment above for some good reasons to have sentences like this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnitaShort

La Pluma to me made sense when I saw the word Feather, as old ink pens were feathers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ryon.selle

I was laughed at by some of my spanish speaking frienda for using "boligrafo" for pen. They said i sounded too fancy and that pluma was more widely used


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RDjMCR

Feathers can be fun in a hotel hightens those sensory nerves ;-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kymmer.c

Oh my. I put "She wore the feather to the hotel" Llevo can mean wore, and pluma can mean feather, and al can mean to the.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brendan84

I use this sentence every day


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mariana.Gajcin

Another awkward sentence


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarolAnn362292

My translation given is that she took the feather to the hotel.... May i ask why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TerriCianc

I find it reassuring that this many people are irritated by this sentence. Learning should be relevant.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulValery0

WTF????!!!! Who invents these sentences? LOL!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Greenmillie64

I thought pluma was sometimes a pen?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shantil

Either way .... Feather or Pen is a correct translation y therefore we should have been marked as correct for using either word! Especially as they didn't give us any other context to go by for choosing one option over the other :( Not fair ... We'll just have to practice our mind reading skills more :)p!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HableEspanol

I carried the needle to the parliament. The same senseless statement.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tadhg620375

Maybe she took the feather to the hotel to have a little fun with it ;) You kinky folks out there perhaps know what I'm talking about.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/charlotte563098

La pluma was the only word I learned for pen in school years ago. lts fun to learn different expressions.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/george75305

While i know la pluma ia a feather. I was always taught it meant pen


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Delphine383753

And now, "pluma" means feather!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Delphine383753

Like I said, what century is this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DennisKayK

Taking a pen to a hotel is very logical, but taking a feather to a hotel? Why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nasuna

Maybe she's a classic French maid with a feather duster.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jfhjdkghftu

wat is tirimiu q la pluma yenvjsuerm hjwdkkvi hadmare


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PedroFelis2

OMG, how relevant is this in real life?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shantil

Feather not father :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maxinedev

This is the stupidest sentence encountered so far on Duolingo. I really wish the people who think up these sentences would create sentences that "are with the times" and make sense. But "she took the feather to the hotel" is downright dumb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IslamLotfy

why didn't she take her bf? that girl needs to chill :D

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