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  5. "Dyret lukter ikke."

"Dyret lukter ikke."

Translation:The animal does not smell.

May 22, 2015

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MauriceReeves

Is this like English where the sentences has two meaning: "The animal doesn't have an odor" AND "The animal can't smell an odor"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IceColors

It could mean both, but if it was said out of the blue I would think that the meant that something is wrong with its nose.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fveldig
Mod
  • 235

Weird, because I would've thought the animal doesn't have any odors. I'd rather think it couldn't smell if the sentence was "Dyret kan ikke lukte."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dingobar

Yes, and it could also mean that the animal is not undertaking the act of smelling (with it's nose).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexRobinson84

"My dog has no nose..."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roanhaggar

"How does he smell?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/beauwilly

How can I distinguish between "Dere" and "Dyret" ? I thought the voice was saying dere


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

The difference is in the first vowel sound, 'e' vs. 'y'.

If you try to shape the sounds with your mouth, it might be easier to understand the difference; the 'e' is more open and formed farther back in the mouth, while the 'y' is formed in the front and is closer to a Norwegian 'i' than an 'e'.

The second syllable of the words are identical, as the 't' in 'dyret' is silent.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MatthewOgi1

Does lukter mean smell as in the animal cannot smell, or does it mean smell as in doesnt have an odour? Or does it mean both?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

Both. It's ambiguous without context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joehutty

Does anyone else have a tough time distinguishing "dere" and "dyret"? They always sound very similar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/osakawilson

Can this not mean 'deer'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IceColors

A bit unsure what you are asking about. Dyret = the animal. Hjorten = the deer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/osakawilson

I was just confused.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bergvik

In old English "deer" meant any kind of animal, so it looks like the original meaning morphed in modern English but not in Norwegian


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/osakawilson

I suppose it's better to be etymologically vindicated than not at all. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fishyy

And "hjorten" is of course related to the somewhat archaic English "the hart", which is what English used to call deer back when "the deer" was any kind of animal :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CJ.Dennis

Because it has no nose?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aryamaan008

Does lukter have a glottal stop


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Quentin643619

This is the only phrase where I actually had to put it on the slow translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Riley_DM02

Sometimes, the "y" seems to make a "u" sound, like in "dyret", but other times, it souns like "i" or "ee". Is there a rule for when "y" makes different sounds?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Riley_DM02

Or is this just a faulty recording?

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