"Dyret lukter ikke."

Translation:The animal does not smell.

5/22/2015, 5:30:57 PM

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/MauriceReeves
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Is this like English where the sentences has two meaning: "The animal doesn't have an odor" AND "The animal can't smell an odor"?

5/22/2015, 5:30:57 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/IceColors
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It could mean both, but if it was said out of the blue I would think that the meant that something is wrong with its nose.

5/22/2015, 5:34:29 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/fveldig
Mod
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Weird, because I would've thought the animal doesn't have any odors. I'd rather think it couldn't smell if the sentence was "Dyret kan ikke lukte."

5/22/2015, 6:09:15 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/dingobar
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Yes, and it could also mean that the animal is not undertaking the act of smelling (with it's nose).

5/25/2015, 8:40:34 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexRobinson84
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"My dog has no nose..."

8/7/2015, 7:39:52 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/roanhaggar

"How does he smell?"

9/11/2015, 1:01:27 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Stigjohan
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Vondt!

11/3/2015, 9:59:32 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/beauwilly

How can I distinguish between "Dere" and "Dyret" ? I thought the voice was saying dere

11/3/2015, 6:08:17 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
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The difference is in the first vowel sound, 'e' vs. 'y'.

If you try to shape the sounds with your mouth, it might be easier to understand the difference; the 'e' is more open and formed farther back in the mouth, while the 'y' is formed in the front and is closer to a Norwegian 'i' than an 'e'.

The second syllable of the words are identical, as the 't' in 'dyret' is silent.

11/3/2015, 11:30:19 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/beauwilly

Tusen takk!

11/3/2015, 7:13:52 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/MatthewOgi1

Does lukter mean smell as in the animal cannot smell, or does it mean smell as in doesnt have an odour? Or does it mean both?

1/11/2016, 7:19:39 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
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Both. It's ambiguous without context.

1/11/2016, 7:50:52 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/joehutty

Does anyone else have a tough time distinguishing "dere" and "dyret"? They always sound very similar.

7/8/2017, 2:08:43 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/osakawilson

Can this not mean 'deer'?

5/24/2015, 6:56:24 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/IceColors
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A bit unsure what you are asking about. Dyret = the animal. Hjorten = the deer.

5/24/2015, 10:28:49 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/osakawilson

I was just confused.

5/24/2015, 10:31:09 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Bergvik

In old English "deer" meant any kind of animal, so it looks like the original meaning morphed in modern English but not in Norwegian

5/25/2015, 12:05:01 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/osakawilson

I suppose it's better to be etymologically vindicated than not at all. :)

5/26/2015, 6:36:49 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/fishyy
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And "hjorten" is of course related to the somewhat archaic English "the hart", which is what English used to call deer back when "the deer" was any kind of animal :)

7/2/2015, 7:31:01 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
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Because it has no nose?

3/7/2017, 8:38:25 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Aryamaan008

Does lukter have a glottal stop

5/22/2017, 5:49:56 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Quentin643619

This is the only phrase where I actually had to put it on the slow translation

10/20/2017, 6:35:28 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Riley_DM02

Sometimes, the "y" seems to make a "u" sound, like in "dyret", but other times, it souns like "i" or "ee". Is there a rule for when "y" makes different sounds?

7/5/2018, 6:00:38 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Riley_DM02

Or is this just a faulty recording?

7/5/2018, 6:03:23 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/AudreyLin31
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... like dung, it smells like haggis.

5/28/2017, 9:50:41 AM
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