"Nicht alle Menschen haben Kinder."

Translation:Not all people have children.

December 25, 2012

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/neepthegreen

Not every person has children.

February 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/davye
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der Mensch, die Menschen

the person, the people

March 9, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Valarian

A better translation for your suggestion might be "Nicht jeder Mensch hat Kinder."

March 10, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/CK_85
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Could someone please explain to me why "nicht" is in the front and not something like, "Alle Menschen haben Kinder nicht."?

July 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/E.T.s_Son
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If I'm correct, placing "nicht" at the beginning of a sentence to negate adds emphasis

September 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Ajna
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I fear you are not: placing "nicht" in front of an adjective just negates it :)

September 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/E.T.s_Son
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Hmmm...I referenced a German website for that information so I don't know.

http://german.about.com/od/grammar/a/German-Negation.htm

September 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/OgnjenG.

I think Ajna is right, as i understood, sentence ""Alle Menschen haben Kinder nicht." would mean "All people don't have children" because in that case u are negating object, not an adjective and thus the context is way too different... And btw, i think that sentence won't be grammatical correct as well, because we should use "kein" as a negation not "nicht" because there are not articles in front of word Kinder

November 1, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Guilelmo
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"Alle Menschen haben Kinder nicht" is a construction that simply does not exist in German. We would not negate a sentence this way. Nonetheless this structure is used to express something completely different if a comma is added: "Alle Menschen haben Kinder, nicht?" Now it is a rhetorical question which means: "Everybody has children, right/true/haven't they?" In very oldfashioned German that would be used on stage only to indicate a historical play you might hear a construction like this: "Dies ist meine Geliebte nicht!" This sounds rather funny and is never used in everyday language.

March 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Dusty_G
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I get easily confused with Mändschen and Menschen. (I think Mändschen is the word for girl, I can think of it if it comes up though)

February 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/duoderSie

Girl is Mädchen. Perhaps you will fnd it useful to compare with the old usages of the words maid and men for girls and people. maid -> Mädchen and men -> Menschen

February 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Dusty_G
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Thank you for that, that is really helpful. I find linguistics very interesting and realizing the way the way a word changes is really helpful for remembering things.

February 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/chrgd007

why has kein not been used here?

February 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/nicholamartin

why not -all people don't have children?

February 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/TrioLinguist
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Your question has already been answered here.

February 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/nicholamartin

I looked I couldn't see the answer

February 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/TrioLinguist
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"All people don't have kids" means nobody has kids.

"Not all people have kids" means not every person has kids, but some do.

The difference is pretty big, as you see.

February 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/nicholamartin

not how I read it but will check with my editor

all people do not have children (but some do ) is implied in English. maybe its a Canadian versus English thing?

February 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/TrioLinguist
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I am, in fact, Canadian myself. I don't think that's really said outside some heavy, heavy slang (to the point where it's hard to understand).

February 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/21mat5
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TrioLinguist is right. Nicholamartin, you are contradicting yourself. It is not a "Canadian versus English", it is simply English.

February 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/nicholamartin

I am Canadian and British - my editor buddy is Canadian and we agree that it is not clear. Conversationally, as a Brit I would say "all people don't have children" and understand it to mean that not everyone chooses to have kids. My Canadian children understand it as you do trio linguist - so I think there probably is a difference based on country of origin. To be clear we are talking about the meaning of the English phrase not the German phrase.

February 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/DaveFruits

So, Menschen. What connotation does it have, people or humans? Danke!

May 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/duoderSie

Both

May 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/BrbaraScol

Every is more acceptable than "all" in this setence

July 11, 2015
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