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"Vatandaşların burada beklemeleri yasaktır."

Translation:It is forbidden that the citizens wait here.

3 years ago

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ajpthree
ajpthree
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Would "It is forbidden to wait here" be an acceptable translation?

Literally it means almost the same thing, since (in AE, anyway) "the citizens" would be redundant, & it would apply to anyone, citizen or not. But it would only make sense if this statement is actually used in that way in Turkish. Thoughts?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ektoraskan

I've never seen such a sign, I must admit. But don't think it too much. We're not here to translate legal documents. :-] Just learn that vatandaş = citizen, and yasak = it's forbidden.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ajpthree
ajpthree
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yeah totally! haha & thanks :D

I usually just learn the vocabulary/syntax and move on, I was just wondering

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RuthJohnston1
RuthJohnston1
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I have a different question about that. "it is forbidden to wait here", would that be "Burada beklemek yasaktır" ---- that is, if we aren't specifying that it's the citizens' waiting that's forbidden, then the plain infinitive would be correct?

I wrote "Waiting here is forbidden for citizens." Correction stated that I needed "the." Comments? Discerning definite nouns is one of the big projects with Tk. Say what you will about English, that's the one thing we make simple.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexinNotTurkey
AlexinNotTurkey
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1) You are correct there :)

2) It was just a missing alternative. There are a lot for this sentence.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shahrazad26

I don't get the plural (beklemeleri) here. If this is genitive case it should be beklemesini.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexinNotTurkey
AlexinNotTurkey
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First, it would be "beklemesi." There is no reason to use the accusative case here. This would be ok. We decided to use the optional plural possessive ending though.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/carolin_o
carolin_o
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I have a question about translating what is called "passive" in English into more typical english phrases using a subject pronoun that matches the verb person. çalismam lazim - "I need to study," right? but in this example would "it forbids citizens to wait here" work?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bjp123456

Why is 'the citizens' required, rather than just 'citizens'?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bjp123456

Citizens waiting here is forbidden was marked incorrect, the correct version being The citizen's waiting here is forbidden. We would never write this in English. For instance, we would write Parking cars here is forbidden, not The car's parking here is forbidden. These incongruencies are disappointing.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ektoraskan

They're not the same at all. You're comparing apples and oranges.

You can't write "Cars' parking", because it's not the cars that do the action of parking. Humans do it. Cars are merely the object.

Meanwhile in Citizens' waiting, it's indeed Citizens themselves who wait. They're the real subject. After all we do say: Her waiting here is bothering me. So a possessive construction makes sense. You can say: Citizens' waiting here is not accepted.

Without the apostrophe the sentence suddenly becomes ungrammatical because citizens is a plural noun, so you would need a plural verb: citizens waiting here ARE not accepted. But, in this case, it sounds like citizens themselves aren't accepted, rather than their waiting here. (Notice the possessive.)

5 months ago