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  5. "Søsteren mistet egget i gulv…

"Søsteren mistet egget i gulvet."

Translation:The sister dropped the egg on the floor.

May 23, 2015

29 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bobthesane

Why is this ' i' and not 'på'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/melkmedte

Just is I guess, these questions never have any answers other than that


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

Pretty much, yes: "i" is the idiomatic preposition choice in this case.

Prepositions seldom have 1:1 translations, as they can have so many different meanings in either language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joseluisrei

å miste = to lose, no?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

Yes, "to lose" and "to drop", depending on the context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ghayth90

The sister as in the nun?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Camril

No, the "sister" is "a woman or girl in relation to other daughters and sons of her parents."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GerdadeJong0

Thank you Hans, this indeed sounds better ;-) . I am Dutch and I had never heard of this before, but afer your comment I looked it up on the internet and we do have this "thing" in Dutch as well. So thank you for telling me something I had never heard of before! Ha det!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GerdadeJong0

So "å misse" can mean "to lose" and "to drop"? Are there more ways to use it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wengusflengus

I think "å miste" can also mean "to drop" intransitively, as in English "the pancake dropped from the sky".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GerdadeJong0

What is intransitively?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EinarEidsto

I'm half Norwegian and I'm pretty sure that it can't be used intransitively. I could be wrong as I don't use Norwegian as my daily language (my father taught it to me but I live in Finland so Finnish is my day to day language). If you want to have the Norwegian equivalent of "to drop" (intransitive), I would go with the word "å falle ".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wengusflengus

I'm a student in Nordic languages with a focus on Norwegian and I'm pretty sure I've heard that before. I'll ask someone tomorrow, I'm in Norway right now :) (Se ei ole haaste ;) vain sanon)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flurin.arner

Do we have any feedback about an intransitive "å miste", used in a way like "å falle"? Is "Jeg mister fra himmelen." correct, or is only "Jeg mister egget." possible?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LINHARS

"Jeg mister fra himmelen." has no meaning. "Jeg mistet pannekaken fra himmelen." would mean that you are in heaven  and you had a pancake - and you lost it. Of course, that could happen.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wengusflengus

Bokmålsordboka actually gives neither of these. It most definitely means what Duolingo meant there anyway.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GerdadeJong0

Can you give an example in Norwegian for me (a sentence)? Takk på forhand.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EinarEidsto

"Koppen falt ned av bordet." (en. The cup fell off the table.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CommissarFeesh

Can "the sister" be used in Norwegian to describe a nun? For some reason that's what comes to mind with this sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Camril

Vocabulary says that "to drop something onto the floor" is "å miste noe PÅ gulvet", not "i gulvet"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LINHARS

That is correct. 'Jeg mistet jakken min på gulvet.'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pjyX3Y

Can this be interpreted as my sister? Or is it just the sister? Wasnt there another sentence where the uncle was translates to my uncle? Thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bunchybunc

By mistake, I typed: 'My sister...' Should this have been accepted or should report it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amin663889

It should not be reported.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bunchybunc

So it is also correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amin663889

I am afraid it is not correct. If it were to be what you say, it would be Søster mistet egget i gulvet. However this does not sound correct or natural Norwegian. I say this accordng to what THAson has said somewhere else:

  • "Using the indefinite and without a possessive for family is normally used for older family members (mor, far, bestefar, sometimes tante, onkel) but rarely for siblings."
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