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"Vi elsker smørbrød."

Translation:We love sandwiches.

3 years ago

31 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ESCDritero

In Norwegian, we don't say "I love you." we say "Vi elsker smørbrød." which roughly translates to "Our love is infinite." and I think that's beautiful.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Henrique659130

OMG your name ESC <3333

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Le_choc
Le_choc
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You know it's crazy, we finish each other's smørbrød

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReinyDeer
ReinyDeer
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I have learnt a rule, that almost all plural indefinite forms of nouns in Norwegian are built adding "-er" ending except for onesyllable neuter ones (they remain unchanged) and some irregularities. Is "smørbrød" a kind of these irregularities or there is an explanation like "the last root of this word is brød which is onesyllable neuter one, so it is responsible for word formation (like in German), that is why we have such plural form". Hope, it wasn't too wordy or odd

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JenniferTauber

Yes, it's because it's a compound word where the last part is a one syllable neuter word. Another example is jordbær (strawberry/strawberries)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaPirocque
LaPirocque
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What a beautiful discussion

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaPirocque
LaPirocque
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Ok, if smørbrød is a compound word ending with "brød", which is "bread", then what is "smør"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JenniferTauber

"smør" is "butter"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Heithr
Heithr
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Does jord mean earth?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sir_Cheez
Sir_Cheez
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yes

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Heithr
Heithr
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Takk :)

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/endriking

Smorbrod should be just sandwich right? not sandwiches

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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No, "et smørbrød" is singular indefinite "a sandwich" and "smørbrødet" is singular definite "the sandwich" and "smørbrød" by itself is plural indefinite "sandwiches".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SupEvan
SupEvan
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Smørbrød is both singular and plural of sandwich. In this sentence "We love sandwich" is not correct because it is ungrammatical.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sir_Cheez
Sir_Cheez
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a lot of neuter nouns, mostly one-syllable neuter nouns, have no suffix for the indefinate plural

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RamNoEnglish

Now i understand...Takk!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bluemillionmile

Open-faced sandwiches should not be incorrect and should be more correct than just sandwiches.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luke_5.1991
Luke_5.1991
Mod
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It's now an alternative translation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/consultjohan
consultjohan
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Interesting. Can you elaborate on that? In my native Afrikaans a sandwich is a toebroodjie; toe being closed, i.e. lit. closed bread. Pl. toebroodjies. I looked up sandwich at etymonline.com. As a verb: 1841, from sandwich (n.), on the image of the stuff between the identical pieces of bread. But, of course, every language is free to have their own interpretation; and words evolve as well.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bluemillionmile

I'm not quite sure what you're asking me to elaborate on - but here's some stuff:

It's less of a language thing than a culture thing. If you go to Norway (or Denmark for that matter) and ask for smorbrod, you will probably not get this:

http://blogs.plos.org/obesitypanacea/files/2014/10/sandwich.jpg

you will get this:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/9d/Sm%C3%B8rrebr%C3%B8d-01.jpg

Yeah, they're both "sandwiches", but I believe that the first is what most native English speakers mean when they say "sandwich". Some stuff between two pieces of bread. The second is not very common in most English speaking countries. Some may not even realize that the second is even considered a type of sandwich, or even something that exists at all. Or that you're supposed to eat it with a fork and knife and not pick it up. The type of sandwich it is is "open" or "open-faced".

To tell an English speaker that "smorbrod" means "sandwich" is misleading without the cultural background. Yeah, it's correct, but only technically.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/consultjohan
consultjohan
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Your response deserves a lingot! Thank you, you made it crystal clear. Where I come from the opposite is true. An open-faced sandwich—as an English second language speaker—is new and sounded like an oxymoron to me. But now I know!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Theresa_NL

Then what do you call the first type of sandwich? Is there a name for it in Norwegian?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gbarata

It's pretty much the same as a bruschetta, in italian.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flpx
flpx
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Or perhaps a tartine, in French

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaPirocque
LaPirocque
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Thanks for explaning this. I have never seen this thing called smørbrød and I was about to keep the concept of smørbrød as what in Brazil would be called Sanduíche, which would never apply to this (to me, unnameable) type of food.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Heithr
Heithr
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We're quite familiar with open faced sandwiches in Canada. Likely because of the large Icelandic / Scandinavian influence in the Prairie provinces. We picked up most of them, though, no fork and knife. I always especially liked rúllupylsu on Icelandic brown bread.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BillMeyer3

I think , as a former chef, that anymore Americans are so used to cultural variations , that we'd find smørbrød to be a sandwich type. Also when looking at the picture link ed above , we'd choose open face with some of the heavy bread one might find in Europe.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mprdo
mprdo
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Pannino? Emparedado?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarenSkjre
MarenSkjre
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YOU CAN SAY SANDWICH ON NORWEGIAN, YOU DONT HAVE TO SAY SMØRBRØD

4 weeks ago