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  5. "Níl fáilte romham."

"Níl fáilte romham."

Translation:I am not welcome.

May 23, 2015

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ecreature

"I am not welcome." Paul thought, after which he stuffed the woman and man in the fridge, took over their house and became president off Ireland to show them who was not welcome now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SarahHukill

No matter how many times I hear the lame Paul jokes, I almost suffocate laughing! XD STAHP IT!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/O_Fallon

I guess my answer was TOO literal? "there is no welcome before me"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ConnieKetchum

That is my answer too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StanStanDaMan

This sentence just shows that the Irish to English translations are not literal. Try looking at a parallel Irish/English book version of Raftery's poems to see just how bad is the habit of figurative translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rpling731

What is "Why am I not welcome"? Thanks in advance


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

Cén fáth nach bhfuil fáilte romham?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leighfy7

if "roimh" is the preposition "before"...what is the construction of this sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

The literal construction of Níl fáilte romham is “Isn’t welcome before-me”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex130806

Can anyone explain the difference between "romham" and "romhaim?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

The standard spelling is romham. romhaim might be an old spelling, or a dialect spelling, or just a mis-spelling.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnneNoone1

Tá fáilta romhat. You are welcome. Would Níl fáilte romhat be the negative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

Yes, níl is the negative form of , so níl fáilte romhat is "you are not welcome".

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