Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"Arbeidsledige lever på dagpenger."

Translation:The unemployed live on unemployment benefits.

3 years ago

51 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Boblets92
Boblets92
  • 14
  • 12
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 5
  • 4

Is simply putting the adjective into the plural without an article a standard way of talking about a group of people? Like how in English we just add the word "the" and say for example, "the old" to mean old people in general, "the rich", "the unemployed" etc.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
Mod
  • 25
  • 24
  • 18
  • 16
  • 16
  • 15
  • 14
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 3
  • 27

Yes, though using the definite form is also quite common in Norwegian. Perhaps especially with shorter words. For me, it sounds natural to say "arbeidsledige", but "de rike" or "de eldre", for instance.

You can also just write it out as "rike [folk/mennesker]", but again this is something that'll sound more natural with some words than others.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pac
Pac
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 8
  • 7
  • 5
  • 4

lol I entered "on the dole" and it was accepted. Good job moderators.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cs1991
cs1991
  • 20
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 5
  • 2

I am just wondering if welfare would be acceptable or if that is more just English speaking slang

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LINHARS
LINHARS
  • 18
  • 14
  • 11
  • 8
  • 6
  • 5

In Norwegian you could say arbeidsledighetstrygd instead of dagpenger

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReginoldHutchens

What a simple and inviting word. ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LINHARS
LINHARS
  • 18
  • 14
  • 11
  • 8
  • 6
  • 5

he, he .... I agree. You can keep saying the word to yourself, it's a good exercise. It is actually three words: arbeid (work), ledig (free) and trygd (social benefits).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mainman24

still easier than finnish :-DD

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/noah641782

Or Icelandic

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrew_Korsfarer

If you think that word is hard, try menneskerettighetsorganisasjonene.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Minos_Gryphon

that was very mean for those who just started norwegian :'v

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LadyofAsgard1

I think I'll stick to dagpenger...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WildSage
WildSage
  • 22
  • 20
  • 18
  • 17
  • 16
  • 13
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2

Welfare is not the same as Unemployment Benefits. At least not in the US. One must have worked and have had money taken from their pay and put into the unemployment insurance system to receive unemployment benefits.

Welfare is government assistance. Unemployment is an insurance payout.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
  • 25
  • 17
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14

There's no parallel system in Australia. Unemployment benefits are paid by the federal government.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/comeoutcomeout
comeoutcomeout
  • 22
  • 15
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 6
  • 3

Yep, welfare is perfectly reasonable as a translation, and it's common/normal in English too (not just slang).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anachron

I agree, but welfare is also more general. I think any kind of government support going to individuals can be called welfare.

(welfare = velferd in Norwegian.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/landsend
landsend
  • 22
  • 21
  • 19
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 10
  • 1435

Yes, welfare is misleading here.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RikSha
RikSha
  • 18
  • 18
  • 13
  • 13
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9

When I was studying Swedish at school, we were taught that often suffix -lös indicates that something positive is missing (arbetsLÖS = unemployed) and with suffix -fri it is positive that something is missing (sorgFRI = carefree). Is there anything like this in Norwegian? Arbeidsledig seems to indicate 'free of work' ...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
Mod
  • 25
  • 24
  • 18
  • 16
  • 16
  • 15
  • 14
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 3
  • 27

Yes, it works the same in Norwegian with -løs and -fri. However, in this is largely based on convention; on whether the majority of society thinks something is positive or negative, rather than your personal feelings on the subject.

Å være barnløs.
To have no children.

Å ha barnefri.
To have some time to yourself, without the children present.

-ledig is less commonly used in compound words than -løs, and does not carry any negative connotations when used on its own. It then signifies that something is unoccupied, not taken.

Er dette setet ledig?
Is this seat vacant?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zhebrica
zhebrica
  • 20
  • 15
  • 11
  • 2

Thanks for this explanation. Interestingly, in English "childfree" is a much stronger word than "barnefri", referring to someone who has no children and definitely does not want any.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/m.g.doyle

I never really thought of it, but yes, "childfree" is definitely positive, "childless" not so. Interesting.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/21379769
21379769
  • 19
  • 12
  • 10

I wonder why they call it dagpenger- do you receive a small amount of money on a daily basis, not all at once, once per month?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
Mod
  • 25
  • 24
  • 18
  • 16
  • 16
  • 15
  • 14
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 3
  • 27

The payments are made every 14 days, but they're still calculated based on the idea of a daily allowance.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ewgibson

Ahh, that makes sense. Tusen takk!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/babbeloergosum
babbeloergosum
  • 14
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 3

How about "from" as a translation of på in this case?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OsoGegenHest
OsoGegenHest
  • 17
  • 15
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

That sounds very odd. One lives on benefits/salaries etc in English. One lives off [of] the government, one's parents, etc. One lives from day to day.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ondtogviltonsket

Hvor lenge er denne 'fordelen' av dagpenger gyldig, skulle det vare i seks måneder, ett år, eller en ubestemt tidsperiode ?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
Mod
  • 25
  • 24
  • 18
  • 16
  • 16
  • 15
  • 14
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 3
  • 27

It depends on quite a few variables, one of which being your past earnings, but most people would be eligible for a year or more of dagpenger provided that they jump through all the necessary hoops.

You're expected to be actively seeking employment, and to accept any reasonable job offers.

Further reading

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thayrine316230

The translate wouldn't be "lives" instead of "live"?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michal.Polak
Michal.Polak
  • 16
  • 15
  • 13
  • 5
  • 4
  • 2

Definitely not. This sentence is in plural, but "lives" is a singular verb form.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mmabsout

how is "arbeidsledige" definite here?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OsoGegenHest
OsoGegenHest
  • 17
  • 15
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

It isn't. A peculiarity of English is the need to add "the" to generalisations specifically in the case of adjectives used substantively.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mmabsout

oh i see, but in English if you want to generalize you would use the plural form. Maybe in Norwegian you don't have to...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OsoGegenHest
OsoGegenHest
  • 17
  • 15
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

Arbeidsledige is the plural form of the adjective arbeidsledig.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mmabsout

wait can you do that? can an adjective be a subject? and shouldn't it be Arbeidslediger?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OsoGegenHest
OsoGegenHest
  • 17
  • 15
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

Yes, of course. We have an adjective used substantively in this sentence: "The unemployed live on benefits".

In Norwegian, generalisations seem to be made with either the plural indefinite form of the noun with any adjectives that it might have (e.g. Arbeidsledige personer... or Arbeidsledigt folk...) or just the plural form of the adjective (Arbeidsledige...).

In English, generalisations are made with the plural form of the noun with any adjectives that it might have (e.g. "Unemployed people...") or the adjective with "the" in front of it (e.g. "The unemployed...").

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shoikana
shoikana
  • 19
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 2

Would "unemployment compensation" work here too?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kirstm
kirstm
  • 11
  • 8
  • 4

No. It kinds of "make sense" but it's not what's written in the sentence.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ladygagadisco

When do I use "lever" vs "bor"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/seventwelve81
seventwelve81
  • 20
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 5

I'm not a native speaker but from what I understand, "lever" is the process of actually living and "bor" pertains to residing somewhere.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
Mod
  • 25
  • 24
  • 18
  • 16
  • 16
  • 15
  • 14
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 3
  • 27

That's correct. :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/seventwelve81
seventwelve81
  • 20
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 5

Takk for confirming that. =)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shanow22
Shanow22
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

Could I not say 'live by' unemployment benefits.. to say something like, I like by my welfare etc, sounds normal to me

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Huy_Ngo
Huy_Ngo
  • 25
  • 24
  • 15
  • 10
  • 9
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 570

I wish there is a report button "The word(s) in this sentence is way too complicated for my beginning level".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
Mod
  • 25
  • 24
  • 18
  • 16
  • 16
  • 15
  • 14
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 3
  • 27

Ironically, the less Norwegian you know when moving to Norway, the more likely you are to find yourself needing the words "arbeidsledig" and "dagpenger".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michal.Polak
Michal.Polak
  • 16
  • 15
  • 13
  • 5
  • 4
  • 2

"The unemployed live on pogey." - How did you come to "pogey"? Sounds like something they'd say in Canada…

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
Mod
  • 25
  • 24
  • 18
  • 16
  • 16
  • 15
  • 14
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 3
  • 27

You have a problem with that, eh?

It's indeed used in Canada, and a less formal term comparable to the dole. Historically, it was another name for a poorhouse or welfare office.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RebeccaGre443084
RebeccaGre443084
  • 14
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 3

Well, I can't say "I did it" in Norwegian but I sure can say "unemployment benefits!"

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/meliton.NO
meliton.NO
  • 17
  • 15
  • 252

that would be "jeg gjorde det"

now you know both!

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThomasLitt7

Does dagpenger literally translate as "day money"?

4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThomasLitt7

Could you also say "Live off unemployment benefits"?

4 weeks ago