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  5. "Frukt og grønnsaker"

"Frukt og grønnsaker"

Translation:Fruit and vegetables

May 24, 2015

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bronzdragon

My Norwegian room-mate says grønnsaker literally means "green stuff". I think that's neat.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alek_d

Yes, "grønn" means "green" and "sak" means "thing" or "case" (as in "case study", not as "box"). Apparently the phrase "for the sake of" might be from Old Norse.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AutumnWine

I think this could be translated as fruit and (just) greens


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

It's been added now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ilya723583

Should there be an article before the word "frukt"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

"Frukt" and "fruit" are used as mass nouns here, which is why they don't take an article.

If "frukt" were referring to a single fruit, and part of a full sentence as Bronzdragon said, then it would indeed require an article.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ilya723583

Got it. I've never noticed before that the word "fruit" without "s" on the end can also be plural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

We learn something new every day. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bronzdragon

In a real sentence, yes. This is a sentence fragment though, not a full sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/charlesisbozo

How do I tell single "vegetables" from plural?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

singular: vegetable = grønnsak
plural: vegetables = grønnsaker


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marie852846

Some of the old words are very intresting

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