"Et døgn"

Translation:24 hours

May 24, 2015

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Iorua

I love this word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/turner227

We have this distinction in Welsh as well - Dydd/Diwrnod


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/martnoizz

Polish has "doba", so there you go...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yakuul

And jour/journée in French.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MartHeerink

And dag (dag) / etmaal (døgn) in Dutch


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Isla_Harlow

Any particular reason?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hhinteser

Can someone provide context for when you would use en dag vs et døgn?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andershava

"En dag" is used more often when you talk about something that is to happen "one/some day in the future". "Et døgn" is pretty much only used when you want to emphasize that you are talking about a time period of 24 hours. Example 1: "Deigen tar et døgn å heve" - "The dough takes 24 hours to rise" Example 2: "Vi burde dra til stranden en dag" - "We should go to the beach some day"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kokiri85

Is døgn/dag at all comparable to French journée/jour?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elenaverano

Very well explained. Also, for me "dag/døgn" corresponds well with the Ukrainian "denj/doba" (a day/24 hours), it's easy to remember.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yaguarete.Pl

Same in Polish, dzień/day/denj/dag in law meaning is some day like a monday, a post office delieves package on 3 days, does nit mean in what clock's time. Doba/24 hours/doba/døgn means litterally in 24 hours, the count must accept or reject proposal in 24 hours of receipt.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vintovka

О, вау! Теперь, благодаря норвежскому, я знаю, как сутки по-украински. =) Пути duolingo неисповедимы.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elenaverano

А ещё по-польски и на нескольких других языках :) Странно, правда, что в английском нет слова "сутки".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/potemik

А в русском даже есть выражение "24 часа в сутки" :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/weerwater

In Dutch et døgn will be translated with: een etmaal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arkhaeaeon

Old English used to have this distinction: dæg (day) and dogor (same root as Nor. døgn, a poetic term which didn't survive into modern English, though I'd expect something like 'dower' or 'dour').


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grauer_Pilger

That reminds me of the German "Dauer".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/7bubble7

We have this in polish too, "doba".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Megairathewitch

Yes, in Latvian, too - diennakts (which literally means "day-night").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NuggetPls

So is this the equivalent of "journée" in French?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/romaincauquil

Je ne pense pas, une journée n'incluant pas la nuit..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pastel_shoal

Maybe a stupid question, but why use 'et' before døgn?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Megairathewitch

"Et døgn" is a noun, and it needs its article. The same like you would say "a day", "a week", instead of just "day" or "week".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bruce-CallMeSoda

Even after reading all the comments, I'm still a little confused. If "et døgn" is "24 hours", then is "en dag" something else? Is "en dag" specifically the period from sunrise to sunset? Is "et døgn" specifically midnight to midnight (a calendar day), or could it be 10:30 to 10:30 the following day? Also, is "et døgn" a period of 24 consecutive hours, or just any 24 hours? Sorry in advance for so many questions.

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