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"Et døgn"

Translation:24 hours

3 years ago

29 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Iorua
Iorua
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I love this word.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/turner227
turner227Plus
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We have this distinction in Welsh as well - Dydd/Diwrnod

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/martnoizz

Polish has "doba", so there you go...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yakuul
YakuulPlus
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And jour/journée in French.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Libor
Libor
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Pas vrais

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Isla_Harlow

Any particular reason?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hhintser
hhintser
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Can someone provide context for when you would use en dag vs et døgn?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andershava

"En dag" is used more often when you talk about something that is to happen "one/some day in the future". "Et døgn" is pretty much only used when you want to emphasize that you are talking about a time period of 24 hours. Example 1: "Deigen tar et døgn å heve" - "The dough takes 24 hours to rise" Example 2: "Vi burde dra til stranden en dag" - "We should go to the beach some day"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kokiri85
kokiri85Plus
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Is døgn/dag at all comparable to French journée/jour?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elenaverano
Elenaverano
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Very well explained. Also, for me "dag/døgn" corresponds well with the Ukrainian "denj/doba" (a day/24 hours), it's easy to remember.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yaguarete.Pl

Same in Polish, dzień/day/denj/dag in law meaning is some day like a monday, a post office delieves package on 3 days, does nit mean in what clock's time. Doba/24 hours/doba/døgn means litterally in 24 hours, the count must accept or reject proposal in 24 hours of receipt.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vintovka
vintovka
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О, вау! Теперь, благодаря норвежскому, я знаю, как сутки по-украински. =) Пути duolingo неисповедимы.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elenaverano
Elenaverano
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А ещё по-польски и на нескольких других языках :) Странно, правда, что в английском нет слова "сутки".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/potemik
potemik
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А в русском даже есть выражение "24 часа в сутки" :D

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hhintser
hhintser
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Thank you!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/weerwater
weerwater
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In Dutch et døgn will be translated with: een etmaal.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/7bubble7
7bubble7
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We have this in polish too, "doba".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Megairathewitch
Megairathewitch
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Yes, in Latvian, too - diennakts (which literally means "day-night").

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Highblood

So is this the equivalent of "journée" in French?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/romaincauquil

Je ne pense pas, une journée n'incluant pas la nuit..

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pastel_shoal

Maybe a stupid question, but why use 'et' before døgn?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Megairathewitch
Megairathewitch
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"Et døgn" is a noun, and it needs its article. The same like you would say "a day", "a week", instead of just "day" or "week".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arkhaeaeon
Arkhaeaeon
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Old English used to have this distinction: dæg (day) and dogor (same root as Nor. døgn, a poetic term which didn't survive into modern English, though I'd expect something like 'dower' or 'dour').

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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I tried a diurnal period which, on earth, is 24 hours. and got dinged.

And when I got it again I got dinged for saying a 24 hour even though it has the et attached which we keep getting hammered to mean an indefinite article.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TobyBartels
TobyBartels
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You can't say ‘a 24 hour’ in English, although you can say ‘a 24-hour period’; they might accept that.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TobyBartels
TobyBartels
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They do indeed accept ‘a 24-hour period’.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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And someone doesn't like this and doesn't say why or answer my complaint. :/

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elenaverano
Elenaverano
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Imo, it's similar to a dozen (eggs) ‒ 12 eggs. We don't say a 12 eggs just because of its equivalent "dozen". English doesn't have a direct equivalent of "et døgn", so we use 24 hours instead.

The "diurnal period" one is wrong because its meaning is related to some repeating occurrence, a daily cycle, biological activity during the day. While "et døgn" is a simple everyday word related to calendar. Like, a week is 24*7 hours. A century = 100 years. Et døgn = 24 hours.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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Thank you. It seems that I've been looking at it wrong and didn't know that. Maybe now I can get past this lesson?

2 years ago