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"Tourists need passports."

Translation:Turister trenger pass.

3 years ago

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/CroverAzureus

Why can I not use 'passer'?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaCigher

Most neutral monosyllabic words in Norwegian keep the same form in the plural as in the singular. Therefore: et land - landet - land - landene. The same goes for passport: et pass - passet - pass - passene

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alphabetjohn
alphabetjohn
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Trenge/behøve: is there a difference?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
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They're interchangeable whenever you're expressing a need for something, similarly to "need" and "require" in English.

In that meaning, "å trenge" is the more common, while "å behøve" comes off as somewhat more formal. A third option is "å ha behov for" (to have a need for/be in need of).

"Å trenge" can also mean to "push" or "press" (often forward, through, or into something). Think along the lines of "pushing through a crowd" rather than "pushing buttons". It's related to the English verb "to thring".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alphabetjohn
alphabetjohn
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Thank you very much for your explanation and for introducing me to the English verb "to thring." It seems rather rare. It is not in my 1-volume Merriam-Webster, though it is in the 3-volume version. In fact, spell-check is highlighting it. I will think of Norwegian verbs from now on when I am trying to make my way through a crowd.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
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Bare hyggelig!

I'll admit it's a very recent addition to my vocabulary as well. Someone asked me about it in another thread, so I had to look it up to see if they were etymologically related. You may already be familiar with the noun "throng", which was mentioned in the same discussion.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alphabetjohn
alphabetjohn
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This conversation has led me through some mental nonsense (if I thring a throng, may I sing a song?) to the German verb "dringen," which must be the cognate of "å trenge." The Swedish cognate, "att tränga," seems to have the meaning of pressing, but not of needing. (I'm getting this from reading a dictionary. I will need to ask my Swedish daughter-in-law to be sure.) In English one speaks of a pressing need. So thank you again. This is the sort of exploration that makes language learning delicious.

1 year ago