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  5. "Det er mange trær ute."

"Det er mange trær ute."

Translation:There are many trees outside.

May 25, 2015

52 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marinaaawr

Can I just say, this language is absolutely lovely :-) Especially when you have been learning Danish and you switch to learning Norwegian :'''D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WombatSteve

I know this comment is 4 years old, but I still have to ask. What's wrong with danish?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_ginzburg

I guess maybe it is the fact that the pronunciation is somehow trickier in Danish. Norwegian sounds like if you take written Danish and you pronounce it "normally", without all those glottal stops and stuff. I am not saying there is nothing wrong with Danish, btw, I'd love to speak it someday :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/noah641782

Why is trees "trær" and not "treer"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JenniferTauber

It's an irregular noun like man - men, you just have to memorise it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/antonoverby

The Lorax is pleased


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cloakk

I'm a bit confused about "ute" as well, as I thought "utenfor" was outside, but perhaps I haven't been using "utenfor" correctly. Can someone comment on "ute" vs "utenfor?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JenniferTauber

"ute" is an adverb, "utenfor" is a preposition


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HansCronau

I believe ut(e) to mean outside in general, while utenfor seems to apply when being outside of something specific. For example you would say "Jeg er utenfor butikken" when you're outside of a shop, standing in front of it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brulkosaure

exactly the opposite explanation given as in a previous use case.. just feel lost. How would you say "I love to be oustide" then ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eyewhisperer

shouldnt it be "der" instead of "det"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JenniferTauber

"Der" means "there" as in a physical location. When "there" is used as a dummy pronoun (as in this sentence) it should be translated as "det".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tom642395

"Excuse me, Mr. Macbeth, but... Det er mange trær ute."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/profdanielasl

What's the different between tree, treet and trær


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JenniferTauber

tre = tree treet = the tree trær = trees trærne = the trees


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/profdanielasl

thanks so much, that's really helpful!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caroline-G.

It's called a forest.

(#GifGang)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ppottoprin

I like studying norwegian :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Serena0401

Still didn't understand if the right pronounce of "mange" is a kind of "mañe" (like the sound of gn in Italian, for those who know) or it's a kind of "mangHe".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JenniferTauber

It's just a regular 'ng' sound like in 'singer'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshuaChow3

When would det mean it and when would det mean there?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MizuKage7

My subconscious still thinks that mange means eat. Forgot what language it was, Italian?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JonasVH93

French. Manger = to eat


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cgnioti2903

Everytime I see this word I think exactly the same. Imagine I 've been taught french a long time ago, in school. An this is the only word i remember from this language. Well, that says a lot!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nunes89

What is the difference between ut and ute? :3


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Isla_Harlow

The tips you've got here also apply for other adverb-pairs — inn/inne, opp/oppe, ned/nede, hjem/hjemme, hit/her, and dit/der. The first indicates motion, the second refers to stationary things.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/G0108

ut is a direction word and ute means outside


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/silverthornfire

Easy to remember if one is Scottish :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nunes89

I see! Thanks :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luke_5.1991

Think of the E as a paper bag on top of a car. It flies off when the car is in motion. I hope I'm making sense... take a look at our tips and notes for the directions chapter when you are able to. It is explained there in further detail.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luke_5.1991

Bare hyggelig!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stevie_T

Why do we use "det er" here rather than "det finnes"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brijsven

Would det finnes mean something along the lines of there exists/is [...] ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Noway_Norway

Yes. it is therefore weird to use "det finnes mange trær ute"

(it would be a philosophical and odd sentence)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vildand91

It does:) "Det finnes" indicates the existence of something, often physical objects. So "Det finnes trær ute" is also possible. Especially in question form: "Finnes det trær ute?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stevie_T

Thank makes sense. Tak!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brijsven

I'm not certain that that's correct. It was more of a guess/question :/


[deactivated user]

    Why is æ pronounced like in Icelandic ([aj]), and not like ä in Swedish?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JenniferTauber

    I'm not a native Norwegian speaker but the audio sounds okay to me. It should be a [æ] sound like in Swedish.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NSchuder

    Well, i may be wrong, but i learned that "det" means "that" or "it" and "der" means "there". So i think it must be "Der er mange trær ute", mustn't it?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rebster5

    The meaning of there in this sentence isn't to directly differ to a certain place. It is more of a placeholder to make a sentence. I have seen others explain it better though.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Flamentree

    just to confuse me even further why is the translation off from what is written down in the translation, this seems to happen often. I have seen ute and utenfor used in the same context. This happens often. I hear the voice say Hunden and even slowed down it sounds like Hun which adds to the confusion. Maybe my ears cannot hear it but I hear no change to name just only one example. Kind of frustrating and makes me want to skip the hearing portion.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caroline-G.

    I think that was just a mistake, I believe the problem has been fixed.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexandraManaila

    I am a bit confused with "det er" and "der er" which I believe both mean the same thing, there is. Is there any difference between the two forms?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cgnioti2903

    shouldn't it be "de er" instead of "det er". "Det" was supposed to be used for neutral singular nouns and "de" for plural nouns.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rebster5

    It doesn't refer to the trees. It is just a placeholder.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Josipa699179

    What's wrong here?

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