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  5. "Han elsker ikke kyllingen."

"Han elsker ikke kyllingen."

Translation:He does not love the chicken.

May 25, 2015

36 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ethan1218

Are intimate man-on-chicken love affairs common in norway?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IzayaOrihara_

Help me. These comments.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/craybasmatt

but why does he not love the chicken !?! </3


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IdaeiAsker

The chicken cheated him with a bear and an elephant...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/witchkiller

Hey man, the Chicken is trying its best ok!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arthur495686

Deer and crab dinner parties, sentient chees, and now a man and chicken love stories... This is getting good


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/racheldugg3

But the chicken loves him. Classic unrequited love


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/olyglotED

So elsker is used quite liberally as we use "love" in English, or does this imply he really doesn't care for his pet chicken?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fveldig
Mod
  • 28

The latter. "Elsker" is a pretty strong word in Norwegian, compared to the English "love".

This sentence means that he doesn't have intense feelings for the chicken.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IceColors

I disagree a bit. Sure, "elsker" is stronger, but we use it for most of the same things as in english. Jeg elsker hunden min doesn't imply that you have romantic feelings for it, just that you really like it. I would have thought that he disliked the chicken if someone said this to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fveldig
Mod
  • 28

you're of course correct. It could of course mean that you have romantic feelings for the dog, but that would be a bit weird.

"Elsker" would mean romantic when said towards humans though, in which case it's stronger than "love". But against object and animals it would have roughly the same meaning.

This sentence doesn't really mean that he dislikes the chicken though, so that may depend on the context. It could also mean that he just doesn't care about the chicken.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Riddari-1

What about familial and platonic love? Do we still use ''elsker'' when we want to say ''I love my child'' for example?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fveldig
Mod
  • 28

I'm not entirely sure about that, but it seems common in some places to use 'elsker' in that case. Many would still use 'er glad i' in those contexts.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LINHARS

Often Norwegians say "Jeg er veldig glad i ......" instead of "Jeg elsker ....

Normally I say: "Jeg er veldig glad i deg." to my sisters, to friends etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/polariisblue

Or possibly it means that he doesn't care for his mother's cooking. At all.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/prettyevil

Does kyllingen mean both the bird and the food? French has separate words, English doesn't, other languages do or don't at their own discretion.

I'm trying to figure out if this can mean both that he doesn't love the (living) chicken and he doesn't love the (cooked) chicken.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

"Kylling" refers to both a live chicken (but not grown hens/roosters), and to the meat of both chickens and grown hens/roosters.

The above sentence could refer to either.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mark484003

If one goes to a restaurant, and doesn't really like the chicken dish, could you use elsker like English "I'm not loving the chicken"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LukaTabo

Poor kyllingen :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/antonoverby

Must have been a nasty breakup


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anubus11

Is this love the equivelent of encantar in spanish meaning to really really like or does it mean romantically/in a family way


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dawtty

Jeg elsker kyllingen


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tom642395

He left her for the spider, I believe.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lorenagay

Love these sentences, where I end up in the comments section, wondering if everyone else is as bamboozled as I am....("Hmmm. So he doesn't LOVE the chicken...does that mean yet another very weird Duo-relationship involving animals and people, or are we talking about how bad someone's cooking is? It could go either way here...")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tudy1311

Sometimes you start choosing the correct words in order and you get more surprised and amused doing it. I always feel like the creators are nudging me with their elbows when I find myself chuckling.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaYt5m

Nikola Tesla liked this


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Boguniu

"So I lit the fire, isn't it good Norwegian Wood?" :P


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tom642395

Han er mauren, og mauren elsker edderkoppen.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cvchaparro

Why would "he hates the chicken" not work here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeffreyolson01

Because apathy is the opposite of love.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Z3lpha

does anyone know a easy way to remember norwegian word order? i keep messing it up


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dark_Beast97

Why when we're talking about relationship, we say "Han elsker deg ikke", but "Han elsker ikke kyllingen" here? Why not "Han elsker kyllingen ikke"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marshall270409

Breaks my heart to hear it.....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MateaGille

Can anyone answer me under this, not chicken related section, if the Norwegian pronouns (meg, deg, ham, henne, det, den; oss, dere, dem) are the same for direct and indirect OBJECT? I posted this question twice (under the right category) but haven't got any response so far. This would pretty help me. Tusen takk

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