"An ngearrann tú an léine?"

Translation:Do you cut the shirt?

3 years ago

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/alibax
alibax
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Ach cén fáth?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Is lú baol é ná eilifintí a ghearradh.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/annamere
annamere
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Could this be in preparation for sewing it together or is it simply destructive?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Either. just cutting

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/annamere
annamere
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thank you!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fiachra691900
Fiachra691900
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Pól just wants to cut his sleeves off so he can show off his gains :')

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/4meerschweinchen
4meerschweinchen
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why is everyone cutting shirts?!?!?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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It’s less dangerous than cutting elephants.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piongain

I'm just wondering about the tone of voice for asking questions. It seems as though her voice didn't have that questioning tone. Does Irish differ from English as far as the tone doesn't indicate question-sentences? I hope you know what I mean. I sometimes have difficulties expressing myself with the written word. I'm actually hoping that, as a by-product, that learning Irish can help with my English grammar.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KittDunne
KittDunne
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The term for what you're asking about is "intonation". Irish has a different intonation to English. Maybe an expert can elaborate.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/An.Cat.Dubh

Too much Guinness here

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GrBrns_

Why Pól? Why?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BelugaBaleine

Would the word gearrann have anything to do with gearr (short)?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

The root of the verb is gearr, which is also the adjective "short". Yes, they are closely related.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OliverCasserley

I just thought that "Do you shorten the shirt" might be acceptable here but seemingly not. Any comments please.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

giorraigh or giortaigh are more specifically "shorten".

Gearr is only indirectly "shorten", because most things are indeed shorter after you cut them.

1 month ago
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